Pamphlet advertising Jacksonville and the Florida Union

Pamphlet advertising Jacksonville and the Florida Union

Transcript

Florida
_____________________

[left column]

planted in vegetables will yield a handsom [sic]
revenue, as the vegetables ripen very early and
bring large prices in New York, to which place
they can be safely sent by express. This year
the express charges from this place to New York
on tomatoes was seventy-five cents per bushel,
and the first lots sent forward sold for twenty-
four dollars per bushel. They now bring from
five to six dollars per bushel. Fruits also grow
well and profitably, including oranges, lemons,
peaches, figs, grapes and plums of all descriptions.
Strawberries do well. Any man who
will work can make a good living from his farm
after the first year, and with a better prospect
of growing rich than in any other state.

Immigrants from the north are welcomed by
the people and are not disturbed. Men and
money are wanted to build up the state and develop
its resources. A northern man, as a rule,
is as safe here as at home provided he quietly
attends to his own business and does not seek
occasions to quarrel with his neighbors.

School facilities at present are poor, but
these will improve as the population increases.
Churches are scarce except in towns.

Communications between Jacksonville and the
north is regular and easy. The mails arrive
and depart daily, and a telegraph line will soon
be open for business. From New York to Jacksonville
the usual route is, by steamer (three
times a week) to Savannah-seventy-two hours
average length of voyage, -from Savannah to
Jacksonville by railroad, a ride of sixteen hours,
traveling all night, without sleeping cars; -or
by steamers (three boats connecting with the
N.Y. steamers) a trip of twenty to twenty
four hours, according to state of tide. The fare
from New York to Jacksonville is between forty
and fifty dollars, but through tickets cost only
about thirty-five.

Speculators, not wishing to settle here them

[right column]

selves, but to find profitable investments for their
money can be well accommodated. Good hotels
are wanted at Jacksonville, and other places, to
accommodate the large number of strangers who-
are constantly coming and going, and the hun-
dreds of invalids from the north who flock here
in winter. At present the hotel accommodations
of Florida are insufficient to meet the wants of
tavellers [sic] and visitors. A large first class hotel
at any prominent place would pay a hundred
per cent profit. Large plantations to be cut up
into small farms for settlers would also pay well,
and many other chances for profitable investment
are always at hand.

Climate. The climate of Florida has the
reputation of being one of the finest in the
world, and this reputation is well deserved. -
Persons whose weak lungs are sore throats cannot
bear a harsh winter climate can enjoy exemption
from pain here. The winters are very
mild and pleasant; the summer, though long
and hot, is far preferable to the same season
north, as the air is more pure and bracing, the
heat is tempered by pleasant breezes, and the
nights are generally cool and comfortable. -
There are no unhealthy fogs by day or damp
dews in the evening, and a free out-door life is
enjoyable at any season of the year. The climate
is very healthy at all times. Strangers coming
from the north, -as in all other warm cli-
mates-must, as a rule, submit to some acclimating
sickness, but this is very mild in comparison
to other southern states.

Come! To all sober, industrious and intelligent
men with or without families who desire
comfortable homes in a pleasant climate and
fruitful land we say, -come to Florida!

If further information is desired address the
editor of this paper, but do not forget to enclose
the proper postage stamps for an answer.


1

Florida
_____________________
The Florida Union,
is published every Saturday Morning
at
Jacksonville, Florida.

The "Florida Union" is one of the best weekly papers published
in the south. It contains, in addition to its general intelligence,
very full local news of a character particularly valuable
to persons desirous of obtaining information concerning Florida;
and one or more carefully prepared articles in every number upon
its soil, climate, or productions; its inducements to settlers, and
its advantages as a temporary or permanent residence.

It also contains a reliable meteorological record for each week;
the state of the markets, retail prices of vegetables and provisions,
and all other information of use or value to persons, desirous of
removing to the state.

Politically, the "Union" represents the Republican party of
Florida. It is an earnest advocate of the immediate reconstruction
of the state in accordance with the Congressional policy and the
principles of the National Republican party. It also labors to develope [sic]
the natural resources of the state; to invite a healthy immigration
and to educate and elevate all its people regardless of race or color.

Terms:
Mail subscribers, single copy, One Year $3.00
" " " Six Months 2.00
" " " Three " 1.00
Subscriptions payable strictly in advance.

Sample copies mailed to any address on receipt of 10 cents.
More practical information regarding Florida can be obtained
by subscribing to the "Union" than in any other manner.
Edward M. Cheney
Jacksonville, July 1, 1867 Editor & Publisher.

2

Florida
_____________________

[right column - advertisements]

Florida Land Agency
L.F. Dewey & Co.,
Real Estate Brokers.
office on Bay Street,
Jacksonville, Fla.
References:
Jacksonville,
J.S. Sammis, Esq C.B., Wilder, Esq.
N.E. Emigrant Aid Co., Boston, Mass.
Our facilities for negotiating sales of Florida Lands are
unsurpassed.
Special attention given to the management of Estates
of non-residents.
City property bought, sold and rented.
A circular, giving full instructions to those wishing to
place their property on the market, will be sent on receipt
of a stamp to prepay postage.
Information as to Plantations or other real estate in
Florida will be furnished on application, either personally
or by letter.
________________________________________________
Florida Land Agency!
1.
80 acre farm!
One mile from Jacksonville, 40 cleared, well adapted to
the cultivation of garden vegetables and small fruits. -
House 16x30, 50 fruit trees - Pear and Peach; also a large
number of young Orange trees. Price 2,000.

2.
A Fine Place
on the St. John's 4 miles from Jacksonville, contains 40
acres, 12 cleared; new House with 4 rooms; several
hundred grape vines are growing on the place - Concords,
Delewares [sic] and other small fruits in abundance. Price
$2,500.

3.
A 50 Acre Place,
adjoining the former, 3 acres cleared. The place is
finely watered by a running stream. The land is chiefly
hammock and admirably adapted to the cultivation of
fruit. Price $800.

4.
A Tract of Land,
on the Florida Railroad, near Fernandina, containing
about 6,000 acres uncleared - Pine and Hammock. Price
$20,000. Apply to

L.F. Dewey, & Co.,
Real Estate Brokers
Jacksonville, Fla.

[right column - advertisements]

Florida Agency
of the
New England
Emigrant Aid Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Principal Office:
49 Tremont Street, Boston Massachusetts.
T.B. Forbush, Secretary.

Florida Agency:
Ocean Street, (over the Post-Office), Jacksonville, Fla.,
Edward M. Cheney, Agent.

Proprietors of Lands,
in Florida, in large or small parcels, wishing to find purchasers
or settlers for the same can apply at this office
personally or by letter.
Persons residing out of the State who may desire information
or advice as to the purchase, sale or settlement
of lands in Florida, with a view to emigrating to this
State or for the purpose of investing capital safety, and
profitably, can apply to the Company in Boston, or
Address
Edward M. Cheney,
Jacksonville, Fla.
All letters requiring an answer must enclose the proper stamps.
_______________________________________________________

Freedman's
Savings Bank!

The National Freedman's Savings and
Trust Company

Chartered by Congress.
Principal Office, Washington, D.C.

The Bank in Jacksonville,
Fla., is located on Bay Street, where
Deposits will be received and Drafts paid.
Interest allowed on all sums of Five Dollars and upwards:
but deposits of One Dollar are received.
Bank Hours, 10 A. M. to 1 P.M.
N.C. Dennett
May 18, '67 - Cashier

3

Florida _____________________ [left column] From the "Florida Union." To all Whom it May concern. We have before us a pile of letters, from all parts of the Union, some addressed to ourselves, and some to other residents of this city, asking for information concerning Florida. The range covered by these questions is very extensive and proper answers to them all would fill a large volume. We will however, endeavor to condense into as small a space as possible the substance of the information required. Jacksonville is situated on the north bank of the St. John's River, about twenty-five miles from its mouth. The streets are wide, regularly laid out and line 1 with shade trees, chiefly with evergreen oaks, interspersed with the China trees and Magnolia's, while the yards and gardens contain orange, lemon and fig trees alternately filled with blossoms or fruit. The location is pleasant and healthy, though quite level and sandy. The population, including the immediate vicinity on both sides of the river is somewhere in the neighborhood of three or four thousand, at least half of whom are freedmen. The chief business of the place centres in the lumber trade, though this at present is very dull, -half a dozen or more steam saw mills being situated on the river front in or near the city. Mercantile business is confined to supplying the immediate wants of the city; traders up the river and plantations in the back country. Prices as a rule are higher that at the north. Board at the hotels three dollars a day or from twelve to fifteen dollars per week. Rents high, owing to the scarcity of houses to accomodate [sic] the rapidly increasing population. A weekly meteorological record, giving the extremes of heat and cold and the mean temperature for each week, together with the state of the weather, -reliable market reports for lumber and the retail prices of vegetables, fruits and provisions; -a church directory for the city &c, [right column] &c, will all be found in another column of this paper. Lawyers and Doctors, can come here but with a poor prospect of lucrative business. The wants of the people are more than supplied in both these professions. There is however no Homeopathic physician in the place and such an one, if able in his profession, experienced and well recommended might make a fair start. Mechanics, can generally find profitable employment. Millwrights, get $5 per day but work in this trade is uncertain. Good carpenters find steady work at three dollars per day, masons also get three dollars per day, but, as most of the buildings here are of wood without cellars, the amount of work is limited. Fair board for mechanics can be obtained at from six to ten dollars per week. Any class of mechanics, if industrious, can do well here. Laborers, receive from ten to fifteen dollars a month, with board, or twenty-five to thirty dollars without. The laborers at present are all colored and work chiefly on the plantations. Provisions. - Meat and fish are good and cheap. Beef as it runs averaging about eight to twelve cents per pound. Vegetables about the same as at the north, -and plenty. Fruits and berries the same. Milk is scarce, as few cows are kept for the purpose, and condensed milk is generally used by families. Land can be purchased in any quantity and at almost any price. Improved lands, -taking improved and waste lands together as the plantations run - are worth an average of ten dollars an acre. Wild lands uncleared can be bought at from fifty cents to five dollars an acre according to quality and location. Farming is easy and profitable. The soil is light and sandy, and an excellent manure is found in abundance in every swamp. A small farm of twenty-five to a hundred acres

4

Florida
_____________________

[left column]

planted in vegetables will yield a handsom [sic]
revenue, as the vegetables ripen very early and
bring large prices in New York, to which place
they can be safely sent by express. This year
the express charges from this place to New York
on tomatoes was seventy-five cents per bushel,
and the first lots sent forward sold for twenty-
four dollars per bushel. They now bring from
five to six dollars per bushel. Fruits also grow
well and profitably, including oranges, lemons,
peaches, figs, grapes and plums of all descriptions.
Strawberries do well. Any man who
will work can make a good living from his farm
after the first year, and with a better prospect
of growing rich than in any other state.

Immigrants from the north are welcomed by
the people and are not disturbed. Men and
money are wanted to build up the state and develop
its resources. A northern man, as a rule,
is as safe here as at home provided he quietly
attends to his own business and does not seek
occasions to quarrel with his neighbors.

School facilities at present are poor, but
these will improve as the population increases.
Churches are scarce except in towns.

Communications between Jacksonville and the
north is regular and easy. The mails arrive
and depart daily, and a telegraph line will soon
be open for business. From New York to Jacksonville
the usual route is, by steamer (three
times a week) to Savannah-seventy-two hours
average length of voyage, -from Savannah to
Jacksonville by railroad, a ride of sixteen hours,
traveling all night, without sleeping cars; -or
by steamers (three boats connecting with the
N.Y. steamers) a trip of twenty to twenty
four hours, according to state of tide. The fare
from New York to Jacksonville is between forty
and fifty dollars, but through tickets cost only
about thirty-five.

Speculators, not wishing to settle here them

[right column]

selves, but to find profitable investments for their
money can be well accommodated. Good hotels
are wanted at Jacksonville, and other places, to
accommodate the large number of strangers who-
are constantly coming and going, and the hun-
dreds of invalids from the north who flock here
in winter. At present the hotel accommodations
of Florida are insufficient to meet the wants of
tavellers [sic] and visitors. A large first class hotel
at any prominent place would pay a hundred
per cent profit. Large plantations to be cut up
into small farms for settlers would also pay well,
and many other chances for profitable investment
are always at hand.

Climate. The climate of Florida has the
reputation of being one of the finest in the
world, and this reputation is well deserved. -
Persons whose weak lungs are sore throats cannot
bear a harsh winter climate can enjoy exemption
from pain here. The winters are very
mild and pleasant; the summer, though long
and hot, is far preferable to the same season
north, as the air is more pure and bracing, the
heat is tempered by pleasant breezes, and the
nights are generally cool and comfortable. -
There are no unhealthy fogs by day or damp
dews in the evening, and a free out-door life is
enjoyable at any season of the year. The climate
is very healthy at all times. Strangers coming
from the north, -as in all other warm cli-
mates-must, as a rule, submit to some acclimating
sickness, but this is very mild in comparison
to other southern states.

Come! To all sober, industrious and intelligent
men with or without families who desire
comfortable homes in a pleasant climate and
fruitful land we say, -come to Florida!

If further information is desired address the
editor of this paper, but do not forget to enclose
the proper postage stamps for an answer.

Source

State Library of Florida: Florida Collection, BR0025

Description

Advertisement describing the services of the Florida Land Agency, including a list of lands available for sale.