A Guide to Researching the Territorial Era

at the State Archives of Florida

Capitole de Tallahassee
The territorial Capitol as sketched by the Comte de Castelnau and painted by Paris A. Bertrand in 1842


Family & Community Life

When Florida passed from Spanish to U.S. control in 1821, it was still mostly an unexplored frontier, with Native Americans making up the majority of the population. Pensacola, St. Augustine and Fernandina were the only towns of any size. Quickly, however, American settlers from other parts of the Southeast began making their way to Florida to take advantage of the newly available land.

The following record series document family and community institutions present in territorial Florida. Collections belonging to families, churches and civic organizations are included.

This guide provides the name and a description of each collection or series, plus its identification number, which is hyperlinked to its record in the Archives Online Catalog. Once inside the catalog record, you can access a list of the volumes, boxes, or folders that make up the collection or series.

Series 28: State Comptroller's Tax Rolls, 1829-1898

The series consists of copies of tax rolls, dated 1829 to 1898, which were prepared annually by county tax assessors and were submitted to the Comptroller, and his predecessor, the Territorial Auditor. These lists provided a basis for collecting taxes authorized by the Legislature.

The kinds of property enumerated and the amount of detail recorded varies greatly from year to year. In 1834, for instance, figures were entered only for the value of land and for the number of slaves between the ages of 15 and 50. By 1861, the information included the number of white males in the household between the ages of 21 and 50; the number of acres of land, its assessed value, and the value of improvements; the type and value of intangible property; the number of slaves and their value; and the number and value of livestock.

The series is incomplete for most counties. In April 2006 volumes were added for Jefferson [1846; 1855; 1857], Taylor [1866], Wakulla [1856; 1861], Walton [1846] and Washington [1845] counties. A microfilm edition of these volumes was also added.

Genealogists and local historians will find this series especially useful for reconstructing households and tracing the fortunes of individual families over time. The tax rolls can also help identify who in a given county had the largest holdings of land and other property. Furthermore, since doctors, lawyers, and owners of saloons, billiard halls and ten-pin alleys were taxed for their occupation, these documents can help identify those individuals in a given community.

Collection M74-5: Records of Saint Michael's Catholic Church in Pensacola, 1811-1956

The first church dedicated to St. Michael was erected on Santa Rosa Island by Tristan de Luna y Aveliana when a colony was established in 1559. Since that time, church and colony have lived under five flags.

Under the Confederacy, the church located at Jefferson and Zarragossa streets was burned by Union soldiers, after allegedly having used it for quartering horses during the Civil War. A new wooden church was erected on East Government at Jefferson Street. Yet another fire caused its destruction during the yellow fever outbreak in 1882. The cornerstone for the present structure was laid at Palafox and Chase streets in 1885 and the church was formally dedicated in 1886. Most of the early records of the church have been lost to fire, plague or storm since its inception.

The collection contains the records of Saint Michael's Catholic Church located at Pensacola from 1811 to 1956. Records of the church include baptisms (1880-1953), baptisms of blacks (1817-1882), marriages (1811-1937), burials (1841-1956) and confirmations (1884-1931).

Collection M74-5: Records of Saint Michael's Catholic Church in Pensacola, 1811-1956

The first church dedicated to St. Michael was erected on Santa Rosa Island by Tristan de Luna y Aveliana when a colony was established in 1559. Since that time, church and colony have lived under five flags.

Under the Confederacy, the church located at Jefferson and Zarragossa streets was burned by Union soldiers, after allegedly having used it for quartering horses during the Civil War. A new wooden church was erected on East Government at Jefferson Street. Yet another fire caused its destruction during the yellow fever outbreak in 1882. The cornerstone for the present structure was laid at Palafox and Chase streets in 1885 and the church was formally dedicated in 1886. Most of the early records of the church have been lost to fire, plague or storm since its inception.

The collection contains the records of Saint Michael's Catholic Church located at Pensacola from 1811 to 1956. Records of the church include baptisms (1880-1953), baptisms of blacks (1817-1882), marriages (1811-1937), burials (1841-1956) and confirmations (1884-1931).

Collection M74-23: Records of the Trinity United Methodist Church in Tallahassee, 1836-1954

Trinity Church was established in 1824 as the first Methodist Episcopal Church in Tallahassee and one of the first in Florida. A year later, the first church building, a plain wooden structure, was erected on the corner of Bronough and Park streets. The church moved in 1827 to the corner of Duval and Park streets, where a brick structure with a slave gallery and church bell was built. Itinerant clergy served the church until 1828, when Rev. Josiah Freeman became the first permanent pastor. The church is now officially the Trinity United Methodist Church and is in the same location, although a new church was built in 1964.

The collection contains the records of the Trinity United Methodist Church located in Tallahassee which include registers of membership (1836-1837, 1856-1877, 1899-1954), deaths (1876), marriages (1899-1954), baptisms (1899-1954) and pastors (1897-1950). Also included is a church history entitled "Some Highlights of the History of Trinity Methodist Church, Tallahassee, Florida" by Frank D. Moor and genealogical information of the Stuart family contained in a family Bible, which belonged to Mrs. P. O. DeMilly (Daisy Stuart).

Collection M75-78: Cotten Family Papers, 1840-1925

The collection contains the papers of the Cotten Family of Leon County, Florida from 1840 to 1925. Items include receipts for the sale of cotton, a receipt for the sale of a slave, a quitclaim deed of Elizabeth C. Cotten, an annual return of Frederick Cotten as testamentary guardian to the estate of John W. Cotten, and a plat of land owned by J. Markhill. Also part of the collection are some cancelled checks of Helen M. Edwards of Monticello.

Collection M75-86: Randolph Family Papers, 1820-1978

The Randolph family moved from Virginia to Florida in 1829 and settled in Tallahassee. They became active in its civic and social life here. Thomas Eston Randolph and Jane Cary Randolph had eight children. Randolph was appointed U.S. Marshal for the Middle Florida district in 1831. His son, Dr. James Randolph, served in the legislative delegation from Leon County in 1845; became a surgeon in the provisional army of the Confederacy; and was mayor of Tallahassee in 1876. In 1881, Dr. Randolph was appointed superintendent and physician in charge of the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee. With his father, he co-founded St. John's Episcopal Church. The Randolph daughters conducted the first girl's school in Tallahassee.

The collection contains papers of the Randolph family of Leon County, Florida. The correspondence includes four letters from William Eston Randolph to his family, 1814 to 1816, while traveling to Baltimore and Amsterdam, Holland; correspondence to Mrs. Thomas Eston Randolph of Albemarle, Va. from family members, 1823 to 1836; seven letters from Thomas Easton and William Duval Randolph, 1861 to 1862, to their family while serving in Pensacola during the Civil War.

An 1835 account book records the travels and business of Thomas Eston Randolph, U.S. Marshal for the District of Middle Florida. There is also a transcript of a diary account by Dr. Arthur Moray Randolph describing his journey to Virginia from Florida to tend his dying son in a Civil War hospital. Several pencil drawings, hand-colored sketches, poems and essays attest creative and artistic ability in the family. There are also is genealogical materials, including two family trees, two compiled genealogies and several newspaper obituaries.

Collection M82-3: Royal Arch Masons, Chapter 32 Meeting Minutes, 1828-1861

The Florida Royal Arch Masons Chapter No. 32 was organized in Tallahassee in 1827 under the jurisdiction of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the State of Virginia. It is a fraternal association of Masons holding advanced masonic degrees. Applicants must be a Master Mason in good standing in a freemason's lodge. It later became affiliated with the Most Excellent Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the State of Florida. The fraternal brotherhood of masons instructs members in moral truths; provides scholarships for learning; and does charitable works.

The collection comprises the minutes of the Royal Arch Masons, Chapter 32, located in Tallahassee. Contained in the minutes are membership lists, by-laws and regulations, annual returns and mark master's marks.

Collection M84-3: Kingsley Beatty Gibbs Journal, 1810-1860

Kingsley Beatty Gibbs was the son of George and Isabelle (Kingsley) Gibbs, and nephew of Zephaniah Kingsley, extensive planter of Fort George Island. On the death of his uncle, Gibbs inherited the plantation on Fort George Island, his uncle's schooner, "North Carolina," and his uncle's books.

The collection contains a journal of Kingsley Beatty Gibbs that was written in 1858 from his notes. Gibbs wrote monthly journal entries describing plantation life at Fort George Island and the political atmosphere of the time. His reminiscences cover the period from January, 1840 to June, 1843.

Collection M84-16: Richard Keith Call Correspondence, 1820-1860

The third and fifth territorial governor of Florida, Richard Keith Call came to Florida in 1814 as a soldier with General Andrew Jackson. Serving as personal aide to Jackson, Call helped set up Florida's territorial government at Pensacola in 1821. The next year, he started a law practice there. Successively, he was a member of the Legislative Council, delegate to Congress, receiver of the West Florida land office, brigadier general of the West Florida militia and territorial governor. Commanding the troops in the Seminole war while governor, Call routed the Indians in the second and third battles of Wahoo Swamp. He was removed as governor because of controversy with Federal authorities over help for Florida in the Indian conflict. When Florida became a state in 1845, Call ran for governor but was defeated.

The collection contains letters written to or relating to General Call. Included is a January 20, 1820, letter from General Edmund P. Gaines to Edmund Doyle, an Indian trader on the Apalachicola River. Gaines asks Doyle to communicate to the chiefs of the "Seminoles" and the Red Stick Creeks the desire of the United States Government to negotiate a treaty. Also included is a December 1826 letter from Andrew Jackson to Richard Keith Call dealing primarily with Call's disagreement with Colonel Joseph White and the settlement of Call's father-in-law's will. Jackson notes his feelings toward Call. The third letter is from Edward Everett to Richard Keith Call, dated December 31, 1860. Everett, a noted Massachusetts orator, thanks the General for sending him copies of Call's recent pro-union, anti-secession pamphlet, "An Address to the People of Florida from General Richard Keith Call." Everett comments on the secession crisis and his belief that General Winfield Scott should be given temporary dictatorial powers to prevent civil war.

Collection M84-17: Records of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Ridgely Lodge No. 9 (Marianna), 1836-1866

The Independent Order of Odd Fellows was formed in 1819 as a fraternity of men and provided relief for member's widows, orphans, the sick and distressed. Rituals resembled those of the masons, including secret passwords, signs and voting by ball ballot. Local units were called "lodges;" regional units, "Grand Lodge;" and the national body, "Sovereign Grand Lodge."

The collection contains the records of the Ridgely Lodge No. 9 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in Marianna, Florida. The records include annual returns, certificates of membership, minutes, publications, resolutions and treasurer's receipts.

Collection M84-22: David Levy Yulee Letters, 1844

A native of St. Thomas in the West Indies, David Levy (Yulee) served as a delegate from the Territory of Florida to the United States Congress from 1841 to 1845. In 1845, he became one of the first two United States Senators from the State of Florida. He was the first Jewish person to hold that office. However, prior to holding office, he petitioned the Florida Assembly for permission to legally change his name to David Levy Yulee; so he took his seat in the Senate as David L. Yulee.

The collection contains letters sent to David Levy (Yulee) in 1844, while he was representing the Territory of Florida in the United State Congress. The letters are replies to his request for information on how the acquisition of school lands was handled and financed in their state. The correspondents are Isaac E. Crary of Michigan; Cyrus Edwards of Illinois; Phillip Lindsley of Tennessee; and A. G. Brown of Mississippi.

Collection M86-41: Records of Pisgah United Methodist Church (Leon County), 1830-1956

Pisgah United Methodist Church, located eleven miles northeast of Tallahassee in Leon County, Florida, is recognized as one of the oldest Methodist churches in Florida. Missionaries from the South Carolina Methodist Episcopal Conference first held services in the area in the 1820s. The Pisgah mission was organized in 1830 as a Methodist Episcopal Church in the Leon Circuit of the Georgia Conference.

The collection contains a microfilm copy of the registers of members of the Pisgah United Methodist Church and of the quarterly conference records of the Leon Circuit. The registers of members, 1830 to 1956, contain information on church membership, baptisms, and marriages. Of special note in Volume 1 is a list of preachers who served the church from 1830 to 1923. The quarterly conference records of the Leon Circuit contain minutes of the quarterly meetings and reports on the membership, Sunday School programs, finances and other activities of the member churches.

A related collection, M91-12, contains a microfilm copy of earlier records of the Leon Circuit quarterly conferences from 1863 to 1882.

Collection M88-22: Records of Trinity Church of Apalachicola, 1836-1956

Trinity Church was organized as an Episcopal Church in 1835 by Rev. Fitch W. Taylor, from the Diocese of Maryland, who was visiting Florida. In 1837, the Legislative Council passed an Act to incorporate the Episcopal Church in the City of Apalachicola (No. 53, 11 Feb. 1837). The Act provided for the election of two wardens and seven vestrymen, who with the Rector, were empowered to enact laws and regulations for the Church. A white pine building was completed in 1839. On February 15, 1841, the Rt. Rev. James H. Otey, Bishop of Tennessee, administered the rite of confirmation and consecrated Trinity Church.

This collection contains a microfilm copy of church registers, 1836 to 1956, of the Trinity Church located in Apalachicola in Franklin County, Florida. The registers contain records of baptisms, confirmations, marriages and funerals. The microfilm also contains church membership lists and some correspondence.

Collection M88-48: Thomas Holme Hagner Letters, 1830-1848

Thomas Holme Hagner was a successful lawyer and a prominent member of Tallahassee society, having connections with the Eppes, Call, Randolph, Randall, Wirt and DuVal families. Thomas Hagner is believed to have been the first owner and occupant of what is now known as the Knott House. He died there in 1848 at the age of 30 of a lingering liver ailment.

This collection contains typescripts of letters written by Thomas H. Hagner from Tallahassee to his family in Washington, D.C. A few were posted from other North Florida locations, as well as other locations in the Eastern United States. It also includes typescripts of a few letters by his uncle, Thomas Randall, who was a Supreme Court Judge for the Territory of Florida, and a single letter from John G. Gamble, Thomas Hagner's father-in-law, to Peter Hagner, written upon the occasion of Thomas Hagner's death.

The letters are mostly concerned with Hagner's family and professional activities as a lawyers in the Middle District of Florida. While somewhat lacking in local description, the letters do contain information on judicial operations, legal cases, transportation, health, the military and agriculture during the 1830s and 1840s.

Collection M89-32: Daniel H. Wiggins Diaries, 1816-1834, 1838-1841, 1862

Daniel H. Wiggins was born March 14, 1795 in Greenport, Long Island. He came to Florida in 1838, from Annapolis, Maryland, leaving behind his wife and children. He travelled in the company of his friend, Thomas Randall, a former Marylander who moved to Florida in 1827. Upon arriving in Florida, Wiggins stayed with the Randalls at their plantation "Belmont" located in Jefferson County. Wiggins, a millwright, plied his trade in Jefferson and Leon County. Like many other Americans, Wiggins and Judge Randall embarked on a journey to California during the famous 1849 gold rush. However, Wiggins died on board a coastwise steamer and was laid to rest near Umpqua City, Oregon.

The diaries chronicle the life of Daniel H. Wiggins from 1816-1834, while living and working in Baltimore and Annapolis; and from 1838-1841, when he journeyed to Florida to establish himself in trade.

The diaries from 1838 to 1841 commence with Wiggins' trip to Florida by steamer. Once in Florida, Wiggins is prolific in detail about his life in and around Leon, Jefferson and Gadsden counties. He relates information about Indian disturbances in and around Jefferson and Leon counties during the 2nd Seminole War. He describes his travels, the people he encounters, and his observations about the growing territory. His interest in machinery is apparent as he provides details and sketches of various agricultural equipment.

The collection also contains an 1862 letterbook of Mary L. Wiggins (relationship unknown) while attending the Female College Institute in Annapolis, Maryland.

Collection M92-1: Papers of the Call and Brevard Families, 1788-1925

Note: The Call-Brevard Family Papers have been digitized and are available on Florida Memory.

Richard Keith Call (1790-1862) was territorial governor of Florida from 1835 to 1840 and again from 1841-1844. Call was the son of William Call and Helen Meade Walker Call and the nephew of Richard Call, who served with distinction in the Revolutionary War. Call's own military service began in 1813 in the Creek War, where he met General Andrew Jackson and subsequently served as Jackson's aide de camp, beginning a lifelong friendship. He visited Florida with Jackson in 1814 and again in 1821 when Jackson established the new American territorial government there. He practiced law in Pensacola and later served as a member of the Legislative Council, delegate to Congress, receiver of the West Florida land office, brigadier general of the West Florida Militia, and territorial governor.

Richard Keith Call married Mary Kirkman (d. 1836) of Nashville, whose parents were enemies of Jackson and bitterly resisted the marriage. The Calls had two daughters, Ellen and Mary. Ellen Call married attorney Medicus Long, and together they had two surviving children, Richard Call Long and Eleanora K. Long ("Nonie"). Three other children died young: Mary Louisa ("Mina") at age 8; Ellen Douglass at age 20 months; and son Hugh. Ellen Call Long was active in many civic organizations and activities, including Civil War and Confederate memorial efforts and the Women's Committee of the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia.

Mary Call married Theodore Washington Brevard, Jr., son of Judge Theodorus W. Brevard and Caroline E. Mays Brevard, and grandson of Alexander Brevard. Several children of T. W. Brevard and Mary Call Brevard figure prominently in the Brevard Family Papers, including Caroline Mays Brevard ("Carrie"), Richard Call Brevard ("Call"), Jane Brevard ("Jennie"), Alice Brevard, and Ephraim Brevard ("Ephy" or "Eppy"). Jane Brevard, later Jane Brevard Darby, was the mother of Mary Call Darby Collins, wife of Thomas LeRoy Collins, Governor of Florida from 1955-1961.

This collection contains correspondence, writings and other papers of Richard Keith Call and his family, 1788 to 1916, and Theodore Washington Brevard and Mary Call Brevard and their family, 1820-ca. 1920s. Included are personal and business correspondence; financial records; land records; commissions; speeches; manuscript poems, articles, books, and other writings; newspaper clippings; and scrapbooks documenting the personal and public lives of members of the Call and Brevard families. Together, the Call and Brevard Family Papers offer highly significant and unique documentation of Florida's territorial, early statehood, and Civil War history, the development of early Tallahassee, issues and attitudes concerning slavery and race, and the effects of the Civil War on the lives of planters of the Old South.

Collection M93-1: Thomas Fitch Papers, 1818-1836

Note: The Call-Brevard Family Papers have been digitized and are available on Florida Memory.

Thomas Fitch was a lawyer, plantation owner, and slaveholder in South Georgia and East Florida in the early 1800s. He lived in St. Augustine when Florida was ceded to the United States and was appointed to be the first Judge of the new territorial government in that city. However, a yellow fever epidemic came to St. Augustine in 1821, and within days of his appointment as Judge, Thomas Fitch, his wife and children died of the yellow fever.

This collection contains correspondence, invoices, agreements and contracts related to the business and legal activities of Thomas Fitch in South Georgia and East Florida from 1818 until his death in 1821. It also includes papers, dated 1822 to 1836, related to the settlement of his estate, which include an inventory of personal estate, valuation of slaves and record of sale of household effects.

Collection M97-24: Miscellaneous Newspaper Clippings and Letters, 1771-1862

This collection consists of photostatic copies of a variety of letters, newspaper clippings, and a resolution. The letters were written by various settlers and immigrants in Pensacola and Tallahassee, ranging from 1771 to 1848. The topics cover many of the issues facing Floridians during this time frame, including territorial issues of American relations with the Spanish in Pensacola, problems with Indians in Florida and Georgia, the primitive living conditions in Tallahassee, cost of slaves and problems with farming and growing cotton in Leon County. The personal recollections of the early settlers are probably the more interesting parts of this collection and would be of interest to historians studying early Florida history.

Other material of interest in this collection are copies of various newspaper clippings from a number of national newspapers, ranging from 1817 to 1862. Topics include the occupation of Florida by General Andrew Jackson, Indian attacks in Florida and Georgia, and Civil War action at Santa Rosa Island near Pensacola. In addition, there is a resolution from 1835 by the citizens of Shell Point, condemning interference by northern abolitionists in the affairs of the South.

Collection N2005-9: Blackshear, Pittman, White, Dickens and Drew Family Papers, 1700s-1970s

This collection is made up of correspondence, personal papers, business papers, photographs and other miscellaneous materials of the Blackshear, Pittman, White, Dickens and Drew Families of Jackson County, Florida and Laurens County, Georgia.

The collection provides unique documentation of business and family life in northwest Florida and southwest Georgia from the antebellum era through the mid-20th century.

Organized into multiple subseries:

Subseries 1: Correspondence, 1809 to 1970s. This series consists of personal correspondence, legal correspondence, and other related papers of the Blackshear, Pittman, White, Dickens Drew and related families. The personal letters discuss a wide range of topics including family relations, genealogy, weather, health, food, travel, education and school, opinions about the Civil War and family members military service.

Subseries 2: Business Correspondence, 1822 to 1970s. This series consists of business correspondence and includes letters, receipts, promissory notes, bills of exchange, bills of lading, invoices, ledgers and account statements. The business correspondence includes details of the cotton and slave trade along the Apalachicola, Chipola and Chattahoochee Rivers, as well as banking transactions in middle and west Florida. Much of the correspondence documents the mercantile, farming, cotton, and business interest of Thomas M. White, a wealthy businessman, banker, politician and landowner in Jackson County. Also of interest are letters and documents pertaining to unpaid debts, land ownership, financial problems and running for political office.

Subseries 3: Frog Level Plantation Correspondence, 1850 to 1876. This series consists of letters between various family members of the Blackshear family at Frog Level Plantation in Laurens County, Georgia. Included are letters between Edward J. Blackshear, Mary Jane Pittman Blackshear (E.J. Blackshear's wife), Martha Pittman (Mary Jane Pittman's mother), Mary Blackshear (E.J. and Mary Jane's daughter) and other family members.

Subseries 4: Genealogical Materials, 1700s to 1950s. This series consists of genealogical materials of the families contained in the collection. This includes the major families as well as related families. Among the families discussed are the Blackshear, Bryan, Bugg, Dickens, Drew, Milton, Pittman, Smith and White families. There are several genealogy charts of interest which help to detail the various family lineages.

Subseries 5: Photographs, 1850s to 1950s. This series consists of photographs from two albums. The photographs are of the Blackshear, Dickens, Estes, Pittman White and related families. While some of the photographs were labeled, many of the photographs are unidentified.

Subseries 6: Miscellaneous Materials, 1820s to 1970s. This series includes newspapers, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, poems, sewing patterns, speeches, reports, land records, plat maps, church newsletters, a family bible, the book "Marse Ned: the Story of an Old Southern Family" and related materials, and John D. Pittman's autograph book from the University of Virginia.

The autograph book is of special interest. Dated 1861, the autograph book contains illustrations from the university campus, a brief history of the university, lists of professors and benefactors, illustrations of professors, and entries addressed to John D. Pittman by fellow students. All of the entries were written in April 1861, only a few days after the beginning of the Civil War. The entries by fellow students express their friendship for Pittman and, in many cases, comment on the unfolding war. A photocopy of the student entries from the autograph book as well as a typewritten transcript of the entries are included in this series. Due to the fragile condition of the autograph book, research access to the book is restricted to the photocopy and transcript.

Collection N2007-1: Pope Family Papers

This collection consists of a small number of documents of the Pope Family of Sneads, Florida, including an 1820 slave bill of sale; land grant to William S. Pope dated May 15, 1829; copy of a letter dated May 3, 1833, addressed to "Judge Pope" from "Colonel Blunt, Chief of Apalachicola Band of Indians," asking for Pope's assistance "as our agent" in retrieving money and goods stolen from him in an attack on his house; Confederate 20-dollar bill, 1864; title search documentation/abstract of title for "T.H. Pope and wife Ruby H." for a mortgage on 150 acres of Jackson County land, 1918; pencil-drawn map of the Pope Lake area (undated, but U.S. Highway 90 and County Road 269 through Chattahoochee are shown); and handwritten genealogy notes, 20th century.

Collection N2013-5: Richard Keith Call Papers

Note: These documents were digitized in 2013 as part of a partnership with the Florida Historical Society in Cocoa Beach, which owns the original records. The Richard Keith Call Papers are available on Florida Memory on the Collections page.

Richard Keith Call was the third and fifth territorial governor of Florida. He came to Florida in 1814 as a soldier with General Andrew Jackson. Serving as personal aide to Jackson, Call helped set up Florida's territorial government at Pensacola in 1821. The next year, he started a law practice there. Successively, he was a member of the Legislative Council; Delegate to Congress; Receiver of the West Florida Land Office; Brigadier General of the West Florida Militia; and Territorial Governor.

This collection contains official and personal correspondence and other papers regarding Florida history collected by Richard Keith Call and Ellen Call Long; and a Journal of Richard Keith Call comprised of family papers possibly assembled and transcribed by Ellen Call Long, accompanied by her narrative history.


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