A Guide to Researching the Territorial Era

at the State Archives of Florida

Capitole de Tallahassee
The territorial Capitol as sketched by the Comte de Castelnau and painted by Paris A. Bertrand in 1842


Government & Politics

Florida's territorial government consisted of a governor, secretary and judges appointed by the President of the United States, as well as a legislative council. The members of the legislative council were appointed by the President until 1826, when Congress amended Florida's government to permit the citizens to elect their own legislators. Local officials were either appointed by the governor or elected by the citizens.

The records in this section originated in all three branches of the territorial government, plus additional entities created to facilitate Florida's transition to statehood.

This guide provides the name and a description of each collection or series, plus its identification number, which is hyperlinked to its record in the Archives Online Catalog. Once inside the catalog record, you can access a list of the volumes, boxes or folders that make up the collection or series.

Series 21: Election Returns by County, 1824-1926

This series contains the surviving returns from elections held in Florida between 1824 and 1926, which were originally sent to the Secretary of State in Tallahassee for recording. The offices at stake in these elections included various county offices, the Governor, state legislators, U.S. Congressional representatives, presidential electors, state constitutional convention delegates and other state officials.

The documents also include a variety of supporting records, such as poll books, amnesty oaths from the post-Civil War era, notices of elections, commissions, instructions to election inspectors, blank oath forms for attesting a voter's citizenship and in some cases original ballots. These are not exhaustive, but collectively they offer a good portrait of the electoral process in Florida over a long period of time.

Series 24: Letterbooks of the Secretary of the Territory & Secretary of State, 1830-1865, 1889-1905, 1922-1926

The series contains the outgoing correspondence of the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Territory from 1830-1865 and 1889-1905. A major gap exists in the series from 1866-1888. Housed in bound volumes, the correspondence documents the various duties of the Secretary of State and provides an understanding of the internal working of the state and of the historical events of the time. In addition to the secretaries' correspondence are proclamations of the Governor (especially those from Governor John Milton, who served from 1861 to 1865) and some official correspondence of the assistant Secretaries of State. The Secretaries' incoming correspondence is located in Series 1325.

Series 32: Territorial and State Governors' Letterbooks, 1836-1909

This series contains the official outgoing correspondence, in bound letterpress volumes, of Florida's territorial and state governors from 1836-1909. The records reflect the official, constitutional and political duties of the Office of Governor. The series includes the correspondence of Governors Richard Keith Call (1835-1840, 1841-1844); Robert Raymond Reid (1840-1841); John Branch (1844-1845); William D. Moseley (1845-1849); Thomas Brown (1849-1853); James E. Broome (1853-1857); John Milton (1861-1865); A. K. Allison (1865); Ossian B. Hart (1873-1874); M. L. Stearns (1874-1877); George F. Drew (1877-1881); William D. Bloxham (1881-1885, 1897-1901); Edward A. Perry (1885-1889); Francis P. Fleming (1889-1893); Henry L. Mitchell (1893-1897); William S. Jennings (1901-1905); Napoleon B. Broward (1905-1909); and Albert W. Gilchrist (1909-1913).

Series 49: Case Files of the Florida Supreme Court, 1825-2013

See the Supreme Court Records collection on Florida Memory to view selected case files from this series.

The series contains the closed case files of the Supreme Court of Florida in which an opinion was issued, including Florida Bar cases. The series also contains a limited number of case files from the Supreme Court's predecessor, the Territorial Court of Appeals.

Series 73: Territorial Court of Appeals Case Files, 1825-1846

See the Supreme Court Records collection on Florida Memory to view selected case files from this series.

The series contains the Florida Territorial Court of Appeals case files from 1825 to 1846. The case files include the records which were presented to the court at the time of appeal and the decisions rendered in the case. Some cases were not heard by the court. There are also a number of cases which were heard by the court for which no documentation exists in the collection.

The following abbreviations are found in the title of the cases: adm. (administrator), adms. (administrators), dec. (deceased), et al. (and others), ex. (executor), and exs. (executors). An asterisk (*) indicates that, according to the Court of Appeals minutes, the case was not heard by the court.

Series 74: Gubernatorial Appointment Nominations for County Offices, 1824-1873

This series contains the gubernatorial appointment nominations for county office from 1824 to 1873 maintained by the Legislature. The records document nominations made by the Governor to the Legislature for county office. Also included are the Legislature's confirmation of nominations purposed by Governors Richard Keith Call and John Branch.

Genealogists and local historians may find this series particularly useful, as some of the governor's nominees to county positions may have been rejected by the Legislature, in which case a record of their nomination will not occur in other places.

Researchers looking to determine whether or when a particular individual actually held a county or state office should consult Series 259: Lists of Territorial, State and County Officers, 1827-1923, 1960.

Series 177: Territorial Governors' Correspondence, 1820-1845

This series contains the extant incoming correspondence of the governors of Florida during the territorial period. There is no documentation from Andrew Jackson's term of office (1821-1822). The majority of the series is correspondence to Territorial Governor William Pope DuVal. His correspondence concerns such issues as military administration, Indian affairs (including the relocation of a Miccosukee tribe), slaves and free blacks, elections, appointments and recommendations, and the Legislative Council. The governors following DuVal are represented by single folders of mixed correspondence.

Series 222: Acts of the Territorial and State Legislatures, 1822-

Note: The print editions of the Acts and Resolutions of the Territorial Legislature are available online through the State Library of Florida.

This series contains the original acts, resolutions and memorials of the Territorial Legislature (1822-1844) and the State Legislature since 1845. The acts were filed with the Secretary of the Territory prior to 1845 and then with Secretary of State after statehood according to Chapter 15.07 F.S. The acts from 1822 to 1918 are all handwritten, while those since 1919 are typed. The series is separated into two subunits, hence the oddity in numbering. The years 1822-1918 are contained in oversized boxes and volumes which did not originally have numbers; from 1919 to the present the acts are contained in numbered volumes.

Series 259: Lists of Territorial, State and County Officers, 1827-1923, 1960

The series contains a conglomeration of lists of officers of the territory, state and counties compiled at various times, perhaps for the use of the Secretary of the Territory and Secretary of State's office. Most volumes contain the same basic information, i.e. the office title, the name of the person elected or appointed to office and the beginning date of the term of office. The bulk of the collection dates from 1827 to 1908.

The first five volumes contain officers of the territorial period at all levels. The first three of these five contain militia officers as well as civil officers. Volume 4 may be an index but its referent is unidentified. Volume 5 is a list county officers (c.1842). Volume 6 contains examples of the seals embossed by various officers at both state and county levels (c.1868). Volume 7 lists state officers (c.1868). Volume 8 lists County Peace Justices (1881-1885). Volumes 9 through 12 list county officers from 1891-1897 (and an undated volume). Volume 13 is a list of officers (c.1905). Volume 14 may be an index without an identified referent and is dated 1908. Volume 15 is a list of officers dated 1923. Volumes 16 through 30 contain lists of officers from 1845 through 1876 that were compiled at a later date. Volume 31 is a list of names that includes some state officers (c.1960s).

Series 415: Journals of the Florida Senate

Note: The Journals of the Territorial Senate are available online through the Florida Senate Archive.

Florida's Legislative Council was unicameral from the establishment of the territorial government through 1838. On July 7, 1838, President Martin Van Buren signed an act reorganizing Florida's legislature to include both a Senate and a House of Representatives.

This series contains the original hand-written journals of the Territorial and State Senate from 1839 to 1911. Most of the information can also be found in the published journals of the Senate.

Series 416: Journals of the Florida House of Representatives, 1837-1905

Note: The Journals of the Territorial House of Representatives are available online from the State Library of Florida.

Florida's Legislative Council was unicameral from the establishment of the territorial government through 1838. On July 7, 1838, President Martin Van Buren signed an act reorganizing Florida's legislature to include both a Senate and a House of Representatives.

This series contains the original hand-written journals of the Territorial and State House of Representatives from 1837 to 1905. Most of the information is also found in the published journals of the House.

The Journal of the Proceedings of the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida (House of Representatives only) is available online through the State Library of Florida. It is also available in print.

Series 486: Returns of Florida's Statehood Election, 1845

Note: The 1845 Statehood Election Returns are available online through Florida Memory.

The 1845 statehood election was held on May 26, 1845, two months after the proclamation of statehood. This was the first election that was held after Florida was admitted to the Union. Those who were allowed to vote were all free white males over the age of twenty-one, citizens of the United States, residents of Florida and were enrolled in the militia or were exempt by law from military duty. Two copies of the returns were made; one which was sent to the Committee of the Constitutional Convention and the other to the Secretary of the Territory.

The series contains the original returns from the May 26, 1845, statehood election. The returns contain the name of each voter, the county in which they voted and the precinct in which the election was held. Included in the returns are a few militia rolls which were used to identify voters.

Series 491: Reports by Clerks of the Superior Courts regarding Monies Collected, 1830-1831

The series contains reports sent to the Office of the Auditor of Public Accounts from the Clerks of the Superior Courts in the Territory of Florida from 1830 to 1831. The records list the monies collected by the Courts for the apprehension of criminals and the punishment of crimes and misdemeanors. Information includes the name of the criminal, the charge and the cost of the fine.

None of the counties' reports cover more than a year or two, but the documents offer an instructive perspective of how fines were used (haphazardly) to punish criminal activity. Of particular note are fines of only $0.01 in some cases for relatively serious offenses like assault and battery.

Series 535: Minutes of the 1838 Florida Constitutional Convention, 1838-1839

With the possibility of being admitted to statehood, an Act was passed by the Territorial Council in 1838, approved by Governor Richard Keith Call, calling for the election of delegates in October of 1838, to a convention to be held at St. Joseph, West Florida. The delegates were to draft a constitution and bill of rights for the Territory of Florida.

The Constitutional Convention convened on December 3, 1838, with Robert Raymond Reid presiding as president and Joshua Knowles secretary. The work of the Convention was carried out by eighteen committees, whose members were familiar with that particular area of government. The process was a relatively simple one, since they used the constitutions of several other southern states as models. Only on the subject of banking did much debate take place. The Convention adjourned sine die on January 9, 1839.

The series contains a handwritten copy of minutes of the Constitutional Convention of 1838 from December 3 to December 26, 1838. The last page stops in the middle of a sentence. It appears that this copy of the minutes was never completed. The minutes from December 27, 1838, to January 9, 1839, when the convention adjourned, are not included in this copy. The location of the original minutes, if still extant, is not known. The minutes reflect the debate on stringent banking rules and the pro-slavery sentiments of the delegates, most of whom were planters and lawyers.

Series 559: Comptroller's Office Daybooks, 1831-1880

The series consists of the daybooks containing the daily financial transactions of the Comptroller's Office and the Territorial Auditor of Public Accounts from 1831 to 1880. The information provided includes the date of the transaction, the assigned account number and name, and the amount debited or credited. Money received by the state was recorded in a specific fund, such as general revenue, license tax, sinking fund, school fund, fines or auction tax.

This series may be helpful for local historians or genealogists looking for evidence of a particular individual's participation in a specific court case. A number of individuals show up in these records as recipients of payments for serving as state witnesses, guards for jails, performing summonses and other duties.

Series 582: Letterbooks of the Office of the Auditor of Public Accounts, 1832-1845

The series contains outgoing correspondence which documents the daily activities of the Territorial Auditor of Public Accounts from 1832 to 1845. The series includes letters to county auctioneers, tax assessors and collectors, clerks of court, judges and sheriffs.

The majority of this correspondence is between the Auditors and various county officials, imploring them to levy and remit the taxes for their counties and file the appropriate returns. This appears to have been one of the biggest challenges for the Comptroller's office in these early years. One letter remarks, for example, that for the entire year of 1832, only one county in western Florida paid any taxes into the territorial coffers at all.

Series 583: Warrants Issued by the Auditor of Public Accounts, 1824-1845

This series contains the warrants of the Territorial Auditor of Public Accounts from 1824 to 1845 directing the Treasurer to pay the amount specified on the warrants with monies drawn from stated funds. The funds included salaries, costs of arrests and expenses for criminal prosecutions. There is not a complete set of warrants for any year in this series. Related materials, territorial vouchers, are located in Series 584.

Genealogists may find this series useful for confirming an ancestor's involvement in a particular court case as a witness, attorney, or other agent of the state.

Series 584: Vouchers Received by the Auditor of Public Accounts, 1823-1846

This series contains vouchers sent to the Territorial Auditor of Public Accounts by sheriffs, judges and clerks of court from 1823 to 1846 to receive payment for work done. The Territorial Auditor would examine the voucher and then issue a warrant instructing the Treasurer to pay the amount specified on the warrant. There is not a complete set of vouchers for any year. Related materials, territorial warrants, are located in Series 583.

Genealogists may find this series useful for confirming an ancestor's involvement in a particular court case as a witness, attorney or other agent of the state.

Series 876: Territorial Legislative Council Records (Unicameral Period), 1822-1838

This series contains the Territorial Legislative Council unicameral period records from 1822 to 1838. The records are spotty and incomplete in their documentation of the activities of the Council. A complete account of the business of a session can be found in the official published journals and contemporary newspaper accounts. The files include bills, records of the proceedings, depositions, special reports, petitions, memorials and vouchers. Undated materials have been filed at the end of the series.

The petitions in this series are particularly useful for documenting the growth of various parts of the territory. A number of these petitions requested permission to operate ferries, extend mail routes or build public roads.

Series 877: Territorial Legislative Council Records (Bicameral Period), 1839-1845

This series contains the Territorial Legislative Council bicameral period records from 1839 to 1845. The records are spotty and incomplete in their documentation of the activities of the Council. A complete account of the business of a session can be found in the official published journals and contemporary newspaper accounts. The files include bills, records of the proceedings, petitions, depositions, special reports, memorials and vouchers.

The petitions in this series are particularly useful for documenting the growth of various parts of the territory. A number of these petitions requested permission to operate ferries, extend mail routes or build public roads.

Series 976: Records of the Special Agents Charged with Securing the Florida Archives, 1799-1836

In 1819, the U.S. Secretary of State John Quincy Adams and the Spanish Minister Luis de Onis reached an agreement by which Spain gave the United States title to East and West Florida. The Adams-Onis Treaty, finally ratified by both nations in 1821, dealt with territorial disputes and with the counter property claims of citizens of both countries. The United States paid over $4,000,000 to Americans who proved claims against Spain.

The United States also sought to recover the archives and documents which related directly to the property and the sovereignty of Florida. These records were to be used to verify land claims and legal matters. In 1821, the United States sent agents to Cuba in order to secure the records. The agents had partial success in being able to reproduce some of the documents.

Included in this collection are correspondence, journals and reports, dated 1799-1836, of the agents sent to Cuba to retrieve the Florida archives. Those represented in the materials include President Andrew Jackson, Secretary of State John Forsyth, Consuls William Shaler and Nicholas P. Trist, and agents Richard K. Call, Richard Cleveland, Jeremy Robinson and William Wirt. The collection also contains records relating to the cession of the Floridas and the Adams-Onis Treaty.

Series 985: Territorial Court of Appeals Minutes, 1825-1845

The series contains a microfilm copy of the minutes of the Territorial Court of Appeals from 1825 to 1845 for the Territory of Florida. It documents the proceedings and actions taken by the Court. The original documents are held by the Florida Supreme Court Library in Tallahassee.

Series 1109: Letters Received by the U.S. Office of Indian Affairs relating to the Florida Superintendency, 1824-1853

In Florida, the Territorial Governor served as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs as well as Commander-in-chief of the militia of the Territory. In this respect, the Governor was in nominal control of Indian agencies, and although the men who officered these agencies were appointed from Washington, they reported to him as well as to their superiors in the Federal Government and were subject as well to his instructions under certain conditions.

This microfilm publication contains incoming correspondence of the Office of Indian Affairs relating mainly to the Florida Superintendency from 1824 to 1853. The correspondence is subdivided into three major areas: 1) Florida Superintendency, 2) Superintendent of Seminole Emigration and 3) Reserves.

The incoming correspondence of the Florida Superintendency (1824-1850) contains letters written mainly to the Secretary of War or the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from Florida Governors, Indian agents, United States military personnel and private citizens. The series contains a tremendous amount of correspondence from Governor William P. DuVal, while correspondence from other Florida Governors is scarce. The correspondence deals generally with Indian attacks, activities during the 2nd Seminole War and the negotiations and eventual removal of the Seminoles to West. Of particular interest is a Census of Indians taken in May of 1833 by various Indian agents at the direction of the Federal Government.

The incoming correspondence from the Superintendent of Seminole Emigration (1828-1853) specifically deals with the efforts of the Federal government to remove the Seminole Indians from Florida to Fort Gibson in the Arkansas territory. Correspondees include Wiley Thompson, Daniel Boyd, Archibald Smith, Jr, J. J. Abercrombie and Major General Thomas Jesup. Of particular interest is an 1849 journal kept by Lieutenant John G. Reynolds of the United States Marine Corps chronicling the journey of a group of Seminoles from Fort Moultrie, South Carolina to Fort Gibson.

The incoming correspondence of the Reserves (1839-1847) mainly contains papers relating to administrative matters of military personnel.

Series 1240: Territorial Legislative Council Journal, 1831-1836

Note: The print edition of the Journal of the Territorial Legislative Council is available online from the State Library of Florida.

This series consists of a journal containing the proceedings of the Territorial Legislative Council from 1831 to 1836. The journal includes transcriptions of floor debates, motions, petitions, resolutions, proposed bills and other business conducted by the unicameral body. This is the only known existing original journal of the Council.

The Journal of the Proceedings of the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida is available online through the State Library of Florida. It is also available in print.

Series 1317: Constitution for the State of Florida, 1838

Note: Florida's original 1838 state constitution has been digitized in its entirety and is available on Florida Memory.

The series consists of a handwritten copy of the 1838 Constitution or "Form of Government for the People of Florida," signed by Convention President, Robert Raymond Reid, and Convention Secretary, Joshua Knowles. The original Constitution, signed by all the delegates, has never been found. Considered "a secretary's copy," this document is the only known copy of the 1838 Constitution.

Series 1325: Incoming Correspondence of the Secretary of the Territory and Secretary of State, 1831-1917

The series contains the incoming correspondence of the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Territory from 1831 to 1917. Correspondence in this series touches on numerous aspects of the responsibilities of the Secretary of State. Much of the correspondence is routine in nature, reflecting the secretary's statutory functions. The correspondence focuses on commissions, oaths and bonds of local officials, local election returns, the issuance of election certificates, recommendations for the appointment of officials, and publications and reports. Included in this series is the official correspondence of James Westcott, James Archer, Augustus Maxwell, Charles W. Downing, Fred Villepigue, Benjamin Allen, George Alden, Jonathan C. Gibbs, Samuel McLin, William Bloxham, F.W. Rankin, John Crawford and H. Clay Crawford.

Series 2153: Compiled Territorial and Early Statehood Records, 1821-1878

The subject matter of the government documents contained in this collection covers many topics of importance to Florida's territorial and early statehood legislatures and governors. Included in the correspondence, petitions and legislative records (acts, resolutions and committee reports) are items pertaining to Florida's boundary, banking, slavery, the status of free blacks in Florida, Indian affairs, state militia concerns, the war with Mexico, railroads, gambling, agriculture, party politics, secession and the Civil War.

This series contains correspondence; petitions; legislative acts; and resolutions and committee reports of the secretaries of state, the territorial and state governors, the general assembly, citizens of Florida and officials of other states from 1821 to 1878. The collection has been organized into nine subseries maintaining the original order of the items in the collection.

Subseries 1: Banking and the Florida/Georgia Boundary Dispute, 1833 to 1858 (39 items). This series includes correspondence, petitions and reports. There are numerous letters of interest between the governors of Florida and the governors of Georgia regarding the Florida-Georgia boundary dispute. Also of interest are letters and legislative documents on banking in Florida during the territorial period and early statehood.

Subseries 2: Infrastructure Issues: Railroads, Ferries, Lighthouses, Post Offices and Public Lands, 1825 to 1862 (59 items). This series includes correspondence, resolutions, petitions, memorials and reports. The majority of items in this collection deal with infrastructure issues in Florida; primarily railroads, lighthouses, mail routes and waterways. Other correspondence of note deals with Florida's participation in the first World Fair in 1851.

Subseries 3: Florida Militia and Circuit Court Cases, 1825 to 1861 (104 items). This series includes correspondence, affidavits, copies of bills and laws, petitions and resolutions. Among the militia items of interest are an Annual Militia Return for the Territory of Florida (1831), a "Confidential" report on the defense of Florida (1846) and a letter to Governor Moseley on how to defend Florida (1846). Other items of note are the correspondence from other states acknowledging or requesting copies of Florida Laws or Reports.

Subseries 4: Florida Boundaries, Banking, Abolition and Agriculture, 1826 to 1858 (22 items). This series includes correspondence, memorials, petitions and resolutions. Agricultural items of interest include letters discussing the study of diseases affecting orange trees and the raising of Brahmin cattle. Other items discuss banking in Florida and the surveying of the Florida-Alabama boundary in 1846.

Subseries 5: Education, Divorce and Railroads, 1845 to 1858 (39 items). This series includes correspondence, copies of bills and petitions. Education items of interest include petitions to the legislature regarding the future location of the East and West Florida seminaries and the use of public lands for schools. In addition, there are resolutions and bills concerning the construction of railroads from 1848 to 1857 and petitions for divorces from 1844 to 1845.

Subseries 6: Military and Florida Volunteers 1840s, 1823 to 1860 (88 items). This series includes correspondence, petitions and reports. Military items of interest include correspondence with the Federal Government establishing fortifications at Key West and Dry Tortugas and items concerning the defense of Florida. Other letters of significance deal with arming the Florida volunteers.

Subseries 7: Florida Railroads, Secession and Taxes, 1838 to 1876 (72 items). This series includes correspondence, copies of acts and bills, petitions, resolutions and reports.

Subseries 8: Negro and Slave Rights, 1824 to 1878, (96 items). This series includes correspondence, petitions, memorials and copies of bills.

Subseries 9: Railroads, Indian Raids, Militia, Health and Fisheries, 1826 to 1858 (115 items). This series includes correspondence, memorials, petitions, resolutions and reports.

Series 2661: Florida State Hospital Mortician Ledgers and Cemetery Records, 1835-1932

The collection consists of copies of mortician ledgers and cemetery records compiled in the operation of the Florida State Hospital. The copies were used in producing a report, "Preservation Assessment of Cemeteries at the Florida State Hospital, Chattahoochee, Florida." The report contains the Mortician Ledgers from 1909 to 1932.

These ledgers record the names of the deceased, the dates and where the deaths occurred (some were furloughed patients away from the hospital) and how the remains were disposed of. That is, some were buried on the grounds of the hospital while others were sent to various locations around the state for burial. The Cemetery Records begin in 1835 and run to 1931. These records note the sections and grave numbers of the named individuals buried on the hospital grounds. Several of the copies are difficult to read. Some copies are marked up with notations from the report compilers which aided in their production of the report.

Collection M81-22: Act Admitting Florida and Iowa to the United States, 1845

The Act Admitting Florida and Iowa to Statehood has been digitized in its entirety and is available on Florida Memory.

The collection consists of an Act for the admission of the states of Iowa and Florida into the Union, approved on March 3, 1845 by the second session of the 28th Congress. At the end of the document is indicated "March 5th, 1845. A true copy from the roll in this department."

Collection M82-1: Richard Keith Call Correspondence, 1791-1794, 1825-1849

Note: In addition to this collection, the State Archives also holds digital copies of a second Richard Keith Call collection owned by the Florida Historical Society in Cocoa Beach, which are available through Florida Memory.

Richard Keith Call was the third and fifth territorial governor of Florida. He came to Florida in 1814 as a soldier with General Andrew Jackson. Serving as personal aide to Jackson, Call helped set up Florida's territorial government at Pensacola in 1821. The next year, he started a law practice there. Successively, he was a member of the Legislative Council; Delegate to Congress; Receiver of the West Florida Land Office; Brigadier General of the West Florida Militia; and Territorial Governor.

This collection contains correspondence, 1825-1849, of Richard Keith Call. The letters discuss the determination of land ownership; disposition of the territorial archives; the First and Second Seminole Wars, including the Battles of Withlacoochee, Fort Drane, and Wahoo Swamp; and political matters.

Call's correspondents include: Secretary of State Martin Van Buren; Attorney General William Wirt; Jacob Houseman and Charles Home of Indian Key; Colonel William Bailey; William Pope DuVal; R.C. Allen; and William Reynolds.

Other correspondence includes: translated copies of letters, 1791 to 1794, to the Captain General of Cuba, Don Luis de las Casas, from the governor of East Florida, Juan Quesada; a partial letter, 1831, probably to President Andrew Jackson; a letter from Duncan L. Clinch to R. Jones; a letter from B.K. Pierce to J.P. Crane; and the deposition of John Whitehead before the United States consul at Havana in 1830. It includes duplicate letters sent by Call and Thomas Brown to Thomas Ewing discussing political parties in 1849. Finally, it includes Call's acceptance in 1845 of the nomination as candidate for governor of Florida.


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