Florida Voter ERA pamphlet

Florida Voter ERA pamphlet

Transcript

State Program

1977-1979

The following items were adopted by the Convention of the League of Women Voters of Florida on June 9, 1977:

I. CONSTITUTION

Action in support of state and national positions in relation to the Florida Constitution. Review and update in accordance with changing needs.

II. EDUCATION

Action in support of state and national positions in relation to education in Florida.

III. ELECTION LAWS

Action in support of state and national positions in relation to election laws in Florida; re-examine the election code with emphasis on the primary system and campaign finance.

IV. Justice

Action on present positions in the administration of justice and juvenile justice areas; continued study of the juvenile justice system in Florida from the time of arrest through detention, adjudication and alternative methods of disposition with attention to prevention.

V. TAXES

Action in support of state and national positions relating to Florida's taxes; review and update in accord with changing needs.

You may refer to Study and Action 1975-1977 (LWVF, Pub. #365, now 50 cents) for further information and background on these items.

Newly elected...

The follwowing were elected as officers and directors of the League of Women Voters of Florida at its convention on June 9, 1977. They have agreed to be responsible for the portfoliios listed below:

Lois Harrison, Lakeland, President

Eileen Belcher, Clearwater, V.P., Education Fund

Mary Anne Sherman, Gainesville, V.P., Program Action and E.R.A.

Dorothy Fulton, Miami, V.P., Organization

Florence Neidig, Orlando, Secretary

Lois Hoffmann, Indialantic, Treasuer

Marilyn Crotty, Maitland, Citizen Participation in Government

Shirley Hayes, Boca Raton, Public Relations and Membership

Lolly Kempton, Jupiter, National Resources

Karen Minerva, Tallahassee, Constitutional Revision

Deanye Overman, Gainesville, Justice

Pat Richardson, St. Petersburg, Florida Voter and Publications

Carol Rist, Ft. Lauderdale, Land Use

e.r.a. won't go away, e.r.a. won't go away

E.R.A. Committee

The LWVF E.R.A. Committee includes: Mary Anne Sherman, V.P., Chairperson; Lois Harrison, Pres.l Judy Blankenship, Polly Doughty, Jean Martin, Sherry Newman, Deannie Picciottie and Elise Webb.

Florida Voter

Newly Appointed

Fran Boudolf has served on the state board as chair for Environmental Quality and is presently Energy Chair. She has been president of the LWV of Okaloosa County. She is president of the Okaloosa County Pollution Control and Water Resource Advisory Board.

Fran's husband, Henry, is an engineer. The Boudolf's have two daughters and a grandson.

Ruth Ann Bramson is immediate past president of the LWV of Hillsborough Co. She has taught American history and social studies in public schools in Iowa., Mo., N.Y. and Hiratsuka, Japan. She is presently working for a master's degree in political science at the U. of S. Fla. She will serve the LWVF as Government Chair (national).

Ruth Anne's Husband, Bob, is a radiologist. The Bramsons have three children: Matt 8, Brian 7, and Elizabeth 5.

Arnetta Brown has belonged to Leagues in Minnesota, Nebraska, and Florida. She was president of LWV of St. Petersburg for 3 years. She has served on the state board for 6 years-- the last 2 as Land Use and Housing Chair. She will now serve as LWVF Tax and Urban Crisis Chair. Arnetta has been a member of the Governor's Task Force on Houseing and of the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council Citizen Advisory Committee.

Arnetta received her M.D. from University of Minnesota with a speciality in pediatrics. Her husband, Schuyler, is a physician. The Browns have five children and four grandchildren.

Roxanna (Roxy) Dear has served as office manager for the LWVF for the past two years. She is a member of the LWV of Metro. Dade Co. and has served as unit leader and membership director. She will be Finance and Organization Chair for LWVF.

Roxy attended Stetson Univ. and is now enrolled at Fla. Intenational Univ. She is a panelist for the Panel of American Women.

Roxy and her husband, Tyrrel, (who is an Episcopal parish priest), have to children: Virginia 14 and Breck 12.

Deannie Picciotti has served as Education Chair on local League Boards in both York Co, PA and S. Palm Beach Co. Fla. She has prepared state guides on education funding for LWVF. She has been involved in many non-League education activities: Ad Hoc committee for Education Legislation for Palm Beach Co. Schools, Textbook Selection Committee for Co. and she tutors in reading at a parochial school.

Deannie's husband, Gene, is a marketing engineer. The Picciottis have three children: Daniella 9, William 8 and Andrea 5.

July/August 1977


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florida voter

E.R.A. won't go away

inside:

E.R.A. 2, 6, 10, 12

From Your Lobbyist 4

Legislation Summary 5

State Program 6

New Directiors 7

Convention Highlights 8

LWV Scarf 9

Constitution Revision 11

New Publications 11

From Your New President 12

JULY- AUGUST 1977 LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF FLORIDA


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E.R.A.

by Mary Ann Sherman

What is E.R.A.?

E.R.A., the Equal Rights Amendment, is the propsoed 27th amendment ot the United States Constitution. The complete wording of the amendment is:

Sec. 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Sec. 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

Sec. 3. This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.

What will E.R.A. do?

The E.R.A. provides that women and men have equal rights under the law. This does not mean that women and men are the same but that the law cannot treat them differently solely because of their sex. E.R.A. applies to government action, but not to private action or relationships. Throughout our history, state and federal legislators have passed laws that specify different roles for men and women-- roles based on stereotypes of what men and women should be doing. E.R.A. will prevent government action that creates and futhers legal stereotypes. E.R.A. will prevent goverment action that creates and futhers legal stereotypes. E.R.A. will not prevent government action based on legitimate needs and functions of individuals.

Why aren't present laws enough?

No United States Supreme Court majority has ever support a general application of the 14th amendment to sex-based discrimination. As a practical matter, for women to ba assured redress under the 14th amdnement for sex discrimination, the court would have to establish sex a "suspect classification" in the same way that racial and religious discrimination are considered. Now an idnividual challenging a sex-discriminatory law has the burden of proof to show that a law is an improper discrimination; making sex a suspect classification would shift the burden of proof to the government which wanted to uphold the law or practice. In fact, in the Fronteiero decision of May, 1973, several members of the court blocked the full application of the 14th amendment to women on the grounds that the E.R.A., which would have the same effect, was before the states for ratification!

In fact, if the 14th amendment has been applied to women's rights, there would have been no need for passage of the 19th amendment, giving women the right to vote.

Why not eliminate sex discrimination by changing the statues?

The great advantage of E.R.A. over a piecemeal statuaroty approach are clear:

1. The E.R.A. would be a well-known remedy. Women who don't spen full time poring over federal legislation may not be able to tell the boss that some practice is illegal under the Executive Order 11246 (chances are the boss hasn't heard of it either). Knowing of one comprehensive remedy will enable women to invoke rights they may not have but do not know about.

2. The E.R.A. would provide a permanent remedy. Passage of individual laws barring sex discrimination takes years of careful nurturing, coalition building, money, time and energy. Each individual law is subject to compromise and bargaining, to political whims and trends. The E.R.A. would provide a legal impetus for reform, independent of political mobilization.

3. E.R.A. woudl reach areas that statues do not. Much of the sex discrimination that people enouncter is the result of government-permitted practices and unwritten policies, rather than the result of sex-discriminatory laws. For example, a failure to give the same vocational training or educational opportunities to women in prisons as given to men in common practice. The E.R.A. would provide a firm legal basis for challenging that discrimination.

4. E.R.A. provides continuning protection. Individual laws may be easily repealed or amended, often with little public awarness. Only a constitutional amendment provides future protection, insuring that government will not be allowed to reinsitute old forms of discrimination.

In short, the argument for piecemeal measures is a delaying tactic. They create the illusion that stronger, more comprehensive measures are unnecessary.

How will the E.R.A. become law?

Thirty-five states have ratified the E.R.A. Approval by 3 more states before March 22, 1979, will bring the total to 38-- the three fourths required to amend the constitution. States will then have two years to review and revise their laws, regulations and practices-- ample time to bring them into compliance before the E.R.A. takes effect.

How will E.R.A. affect states' rights?

Section 2 of E.R.A. (see first paragraph of this article) does not take away states' rights. Whenever the constitution is amended, the states also have the right to act and enforce the amendment in state courts! Almost identical language appears in the 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 23rd, 24th, and 26th amendments to the consitution.

How did the LWV decide to support E.R.A.?

In May of 1972, only weeks after congressional passage of the E.R.A., delegates to the League's national convention overhwelmingly approved equal rights for all, regardless of sex, as part of the human resources position. At the same convention, delegates voted to support the Equal Rights Amendment as one of the major ways to take action in support of the HR position. The adoption of support for the E.R.A. was not a decision of the national board but was a decision of the League's ultimate diecision making body-- the convention-- to which every local League in the nation-- no matter how small-- has an opportunity to send representatives. Prior to that convention, LWVUS board had taken no position on passage of E.R.A. in congress; the convention action was a result of grass roots insistence from local Leagues around the nation.

Any questions on E.R.A?

Since E.R.A. will continue to be a top priotiy of the League of Women Voters of Florida, some space in every Florida Voter will be allocated to answer questions from members and the public about E.R>A. Send your questions to the LWV of Florida, 1035-S South Florida Av., Lakeland 33803. As many questions as possible (those of broadest concern) will be answered in the Florida Voter; others will be responded to through memoranda to local Leagues.


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From your lobbyist

Mary Anne Sherman

The LWVF legislative presence in Tallahassee for the 1977 session began in November, 1976, with LWV observers at interim committee meetings. Mid-March, lobbysit Mary Anne Sherman, LWVF vice president, moved to Tallahassee full time. Rep. Helen Gordon Davis, former state board member, loaned the lWV the use of her apartment until the League office/apartment was available two weeks later. The LWV suite consisted of a modest one-bedroom apartment in the basement of a building within walking distance of the Capitol-- all uphill.

Each week a different state board member and oen or two local League lobbying in terms joined Mary Anne in the apartment to carry on LWV activities for the week. A "Legislative Update" was sent to each local League president and legislative action chairperson by the lobbying team on an approximately weekly basis.

League priorities were supported and other areas of LWV concern were acted on as time permitted. Two major innovations in the LWVF legislative program this year were the lobbying internships for local League members and the appropriations priority area.

--and the $5 per diem lobbyist enjoyed the work tremendously!

Thank you to all the local Leagues which responded with action on the fee schedule for Title XX child care centers. The governor decided on June 13 to approve the LWV- recommended schedule with a maximum charge of $12 a week for a child of a "working poor" family, down from the current fee maximum of $30! Unfortunately the legislature did not increase the amount of money that could be used to expand child care services; League members may wish to monitor the demand for Title XX child care in their counties to see if LWVF should lobby for additional funds for child care next year.

Many thanks to the people who came to Tallahassee as lobbyists during the 1977 session:

Betty Metcalf, Shirly Hayes, Ametta Brown, Florence Neidig, Marilyn Crotty, Lolly Kempton, Pat Richardson and Fran Boudolf-- all from the state board. Also Wilma Felder (Metro-Dad), Karen Minerva and Katie Nichols (Tallahassee), and Jeanne Crampton (Clearwater).

Our invaluable interns included Roxy Dear (Metro-Dade), Teddie Jo Ryan (Clay), Kay Larche and Carolyn Huckshorn (South Palm Bech), Cynthia Brubaker and Sara Howze (South Brevard) and Mary Ann Ely (Broward).

Thanks also for special help by Mary Byrkit and Marilyn Daly (Clearwater), and Paula Ellingrud (South Brevard) for their time during legislative seminars and for volunteer slave labor for E.R.A. by Elise Webb, Judy Blankenship and Sheila Andrews of Alachua Co./ Gainesville.

We also really appreciate the help from those members who helped furnish our apartment/office including Joanne Booth, Eleanore Moore and Ora Kromhout of Tallahassee and Ametta Bornw of St. Petersburg. The loan of those necessities and "extras" were really helpful.

The letters, telegrams, and telephone calls from local Leagues to their delegations on LWV priorities were also essential to the LWV legislative program. The fulltime lobbyist also wishes to express her deep gratitude to pat Richardson for the homemade cookies she sent to Tallahassee mid-session.

Volume XXVi

JULY-AUGUST 1977

NUMBER 3

Published bi-monthly by the League of Women Voters of Florida and the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Fund. Lois C. Harrison, President; Pat Richardson, Editor. Second Class Postage paid at office of publication, 1912 Bonita Way S., St. Petersburg, FL 33712. Subscription fee $1.50 per year; 25 cents per copy.

Address all inquiries to CIRCULATION OFFICE: LWVF, 1035-S South Florida Av., Lakeland, FL 33803

POSTMASTER: Please send FORM 3579 to LWVF, 1035-S South Florida Avenue, Lakeland, FL 33803

FLORIDA VOTER

Legislation Summary

This chart is a summary of bills and items in the budget of the State of Florida that were priorities for the League of Women Voters of Florida during the 1977 legislative sessions. Bill numbers are indicated where relevant. In some cases there was more than one bill on the same topic and in other cases the bills were introduced in the regular and both special sessions: those bills are identified in the chart by subject matter rather than by number.

STAR = LWV win.

TOPIC

#1 Priority E.R.A.

CONTENT

Equal Rights Amendment

LWV

pro

FINAL STATUS

Defeated in Senate 19-21; will continue as LWV top priority

TOPIC

#2 Priority Appropriations Act

CONTENT

A. Child care licensing implementation (LWV STAR) (FINAL STATUS: 22 positions fundedl not previously funded)

B. Child care: Increase in Title XX for expansion into new counties (FINAL STATUS: No increase funded: current level)

C. Increase in AFDC payments for 79% of unmet need (current) to 85% (FINAL STATUS: Increase to 83% aprpoved. Need calculated on '60 figures. Needs more work.)

D. Air quality control program increase (FINAL STATUS: No increase funded)

E. Drinking water quality increase (FINAL STATUS: No increase funded)

F. Migrant labor programs coordination (LWV STAR) (FINAL STATUS: $206, 164 FUNDING *Last year $152,000)

G. Compensatory education (LWV STAR) (FINAL STATUS: $10 million funding)

#3 Priority Election Laws

SB 563, HB 2144: Omnibus bill containing 30-day closing provision (Pro LMV STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed, signed by governor)

HB 1516 Registration at the polls (Pro) (Final Status: Died in committee; waiting on congress)

HB 1955 Voter education pamphlet (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in committee; possible 1978 action)

HB 1955 Voter Education pamphlet (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died incommitte; possible 1978 action)

SB 298 Nonpartisan election of supervisor of elections (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Passed senate committee; house companion died in house committee)

#4 Priority Tax Structure

HB 864 Tax Study Commission (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in committee)

HB 208, SB 33 Circuit breaker (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in committee)

Phosphate severance tax increase (pro STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Increase from 5% to 10% passed)

Elimination of sales tax rebate (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in committee)

Liquor tax based on value rather than fixed quanitity (pro) (Died on senate floor)

#5 Priority Energy Conservation

HB 453, SB 321 Thermal efficiency standards (pro STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed)

HB 492, SB 341 Lighting efficiency standards (pro STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed)

HB 578, SB 428 State purchasing policy (pro STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed)

HB 868, SB 453 State energy policy (pro STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed)

HB 1102, SB 841 Mass transit (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in committee in both houses)

OTHER: Juvenile Justice

HB 2158 Committee bill rewrite of Ch. 39 (pro/con) (FINAL STATUS: Died on house calendar. Contained automatic waiver opposed by LWV.)

SB 911 Committee bill rewrite of Ch. 39 (pro/con) (FINAL STATUS: Died in senate committee. As above.)

HB 88 Original bill removed confidentiality of records for juveniles (con STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed house as CS for HB 88; died on senate calendar. Confidentiality of records restored in committee version.

HB 849 Community Arbitration Program (pro STAR) Passed.

Human Rights

SB 1165, HB 2061 Human Rights Bill (pro STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed. Fla. fair empl. practices law.)

Constitution Revision

HJR 1998 Legis. veto over Constitution Revision Commission report (con STAR) (FINAL STATUS: Passed housel died in senate committee)

Farmworkers

HB 2275 Strengthening of enforcement powers of Debt. Community Affairs (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died on house calendar)

HB 2277 Housing (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died on house calendar)

Envir. Qual./ Land Use

Cross Florida Barge Canal; abolish the Canal Authority and estab. pmt. to counties for loss (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in all sessions)

Mandatory refunds on disposable bottles (pro) (FINAL STATUS: Died in committee)

 

 

 

 


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State Program

1977-1979

The following items were adopted by the Convention of the League of Women Voters of Florida on June 9, 1977:

I. CONSTITUTION

Action in support of state and national positions in relation to the Florida Constitution. Review and update in accordance with changing needs.

II. EDUCATION

Action in support of state and national positions in relation to education in Florida.

III. ELECTION LAWS

Action in support of state and national positions in relation to election laws in Florida; re-examine the election code with emphasis on the primary system and campaign finance.

IV. Justice

Action on present positions in the administration of justice and juvenile justice areas; continued study of the juvenile justice system in Florida from the time of arrest through detention, adjudication and alternative methods of disposition with attention to prevention.

V. TAXES

Action in support of state and national positions relating to Florida's taxes; review and update in accord with changing needs.

You may refer to Study and Action 1975-1977 (LWVF, Pub. #365, now 50 cents) for further information and background on these items.

Newly elected...

The follwowing were elected as officers and directors of the League of Women Voters of Florida at its convention on June 9, 1977. They have agreed to be responsible for the portfoliios listed below:

Lois Harrison, Lakeland, President

Eileen Belcher, Clearwater, V.P., Education Fund

Mary Anne Sherman, Gainesville, V.P., Program Action and E.R.A.

Dorothy Fulton, Miami, V.P., Organization

Florence Neidig, Orlando, Secretary

Lois Hoffmann, Indialantic, Treasuer

Marilyn Crotty, Maitland, Citizen Participation in Government

Shirley Hayes, Boca Raton, Public Relations and Membership

Lolly Kempton, Jupiter, National Resources

Karen Minerva, Tallahassee, Constitutional Revision

Deanye Overman, Gainesville, Justice

Pat Richardson, St. Petersburg, Florida Voter and Publications

Carol Rist, Ft. Lauderdale, Land Use

e.r.a. won't go away, e.r.a. won't go away

E.R.A. Committee

The LWVF E.R.A. Committee includes: Mary Anne Sherman, V.P., Chairperson; Lois Harrison, Pres.l Judy Blankenship, Polly Doughty, Jean Martin, Sherry Newman, Deannie Picciottie and Elise Webb.

Florida Voter

Newly Appointed

Fran Boudolf has served on the state board as chair for Environmental Quality and is presently Energy Chair. She has been president of the LWV of Okaloosa County. She is president of the Okaloosa County Pollution Control and Water Resource Advisory Board.

Fran's husband, Henry, is an engineer. The Boudolf's have two daughters and a grandson.

Ruth Ann Bramson is immediate past president of the LWV of Hillsborough Co. She has taught American history and social studies in public schools in Iowa., Mo., N.Y. and Hiratsuka, Japan. She is presently working for a master's degree in political science at the U. of S. Fla. She will serve the LWVF as Government Chair (national).

Ruth Anne's Husband, Bob, is a radiologist. The Bramsons have three children: Matt 8, Brian 7, and Elizabeth 5.

Arnetta Brown has belonged to Leagues in Minnesota, Nebraska, and Florida. She was president of LWV of St. Petersburg for 3 years. She has served on the state board for 6 years-- the last 2 as Land Use and Housing Chair. She will now serve as LWVF Tax and Urban Crisis Chair. Arnetta has been a member of the Governor's Task Force on Houseing and of the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council Citizen Advisory Committee.

Arnetta received her M.D. from University of Minnesota with a speciality in pediatrics. Her husband, Schuyler, is a physician. The Browns have five children and four grandchildren.

Roxanna (Roxy) Dear has served as office manager for the LWVF for the past two years. She is a member of the LWV of Metro. Dade Co. and has served as unit leader and membership director. She will be Finance and Organization Chair for LWVF.

Roxy attended Stetson Univ. and is now enrolled at Fla. Intenational Univ. She is a panelist for the Panel of American Women.

Roxy and her husband, Tyrrel, (who is an Episcopal parish priest), have to children: Virginia 14 and Breck 12.

Deannie Picciotti has served as Education Chair on local League Boards in both York Co, PA and S. Palm Beach Co. Fla. She has prepared state guides on education funding for LWVF. She has been involved in many non-League education activities: Ad Hoc committee for Education Legislation for Palm Beach Co. Schools, Textbook Selection Committee for Co. and she tutors in reading at a parochial school.

Deannie's husband, Gene, is a marketing engineer. The Picciottis have three children: Daniella 9, William 8 and Andrea 5.

July/August 1977


5

Highlights of the convention

1977 LWVF CONVENTION

by Lucile Churchill

June 7-9, 1977 Tampa, Florida

The convention started well-- every delegate received copies of the eagerly awaited booklets: Our Florida Government and Constitution Revision 1977-1978. All the 26 local Leagues and 2 provisionals were represented.

After the convention was called to order by President Betty Metcalf and welcomed by Irene Silver, President of the LWV of Hillsborough County, each League responded to the roll call by recounting a success story from the year just completed. The voters service projects were impressive: candidate fairs, voter guides, debates, election coverage and registration help. Other local projects included everything from library and recreation studies to booklets and even a movie on local government. LWV of Clearwater asked to be last in reporting and left everyone laughing at their satiric song "Stop E.R.A."

The state treasurer's report was a pleasant change from the grim situation at council last spring. All Leagues have paid their pledges, there is more than twice as much money in the bank and the proposed budget could be accepted with only minimal adjustment.

There were several changes in the bylaws, but the only crucial one provides for local League delegates to set per member payments to the LWVF budget beginning next year. This will place the state support on the same basis as national PMP.

Following presentation of the recommended state program, there was a spirited request for consideration of an item to study the problems of farm works and develop viable solutions. The delegates voted to consider this item.

Vice President Mary Anne Sherman reported on the regular session of the Florida Legislature and urged support of funding measures for Aid to Dependent Children, child care licensing and compensatory education during the special session.

Vice President Lois Harrison described the ambitions national program to provide substantial financial support for E.R.A. It is essential that Florida approve the amendment in the next year and a half.

The convention theme THE YEAR OF THE CONSTITUTION was featured at the banquet. Chesterfield, Smith, Chairman of the Constitution Revision Commission of 1966 pointed out one of the drawbacks of the present constitution which had been carried over the Constitution of 1885 by reading the speech he delievered to the commission almost twelve years ago. It dealth eloquently with the need for an appointed cabinet. The banquet was enhanced by the presence of many honored guests from the Tampa Bay area: long time League leaders who now hold office in the state capitol, county courthouse and city hall.

Caucuses far into the night kept up the tradition that League conventions schedule time for everything but sleep.

Wednesday brought President Metcalf's report of two eyars of accomplishment: everything from support of the amendment ot provide merit selection of judges to the senatorial debates and education fund conferences. The members greeted the president's remarks with a standing ovation and the board presented her with a silver bowl whcih was promptly established as a receptablef or E.R.A. contributions.

The report from the LWVF Education Fund featured accounts of the five converences arranged last year.

As the delegates sat down to lunch, they were surprised and amused by an all-scarf style show. Pat Richardson had used LWV scarves to produce everyting from an evening dress to a bikini. these unique outfits were modeled by state board members to an accompaniment of clever couplets written and read by Fran Boudolf.

After this hilarious interlude, the delegates listened to an instructive talk on Florida taxes by Dr. Milton Redmanof Florida Atlantic University.

Workshops on everything from energy to education were offered during the afternoon.

The final day brough adoption of the budget and recommended program. It was decided to pursue the farm workers study under the national Human Resources item.

The delegates voted to raise $40,000 for the E.R.A. campaign and it was announced that close to $3,000 had been given or pledged during the convention!

A message was sent from the convention to the Hon. Sandy D'Alemberte, Chairman of the 1977 Constitutional Revision Commission urging the citizens of Florida to demand a unicameral legislature to eliminate expensive stalemates in the legislature.

Continued on page 10

League of Women Voters Scarf

THE SCARF THAT'S EXCLUSIVELY OURS!

A versatile 21" square of silken-lush polyester.

A super-fine weave that drapes and knots superbly

The LWV motif is repeated in red and navy and white

Hand washable, no ironing

Designed just for us and for you by J. Marsh of the Creative Workshop in Boca Raton.

NEW!

Order yours now!

This scarf is not available in any store-- you can only order it from the League of Women Voters of Florida or from your local League.

This special scarf retails for $6; however Leagues may order 12 or more at $5 each (or 4 dozen or more at $4.75) as a fund raising project. Florida residents please add 4% sales tax. Postage is pre-paid.

Order from: LWV Scard, 1912 Bonita Way S., St. Petersburg, FL 33712


6

Highlights of the Convention Continued from page 9

The new LWVF officers and directors were elected and cheered by the delegates as the gavel was passed to President Lois Harrison as a tribute presented to her by LWV of Polk County.

The delegates packed up what was left of their displays and merchandise and headed back home loaded with information, literature, ideas, buttons, scarves, bags and responsibilities.

e.r.a. won't go away e.r.a. won't go away

era fund

YES, I WANT TO HELP! HERE'S MY CONTRIBUTION TO THE E.R.A. FUND

Here is my check for $_______ for the E.R.A. fund.

Name

Address

City, State, Zip

Send your check to your local League or League of Women Voters -- E.R>A.

1035-S South Florida Av., Lakeland, 33803

Get your E.R.A. T-shirt today!

The Alachua/Gainesville Leage is selling T-shirts with profits going to the E.R.A. fund drive.

Two styles are available:

A. White scoop neck shirt with "E.R.A. Won't Go Away" in green. Women's sizes small, medium and large

B. Casual ringer white shirt with slogan on the front and excerpts from the amendment on the back. Men's sizes small, medium and large.

Prices for each shirt: $5.25 including tax and postage.

Send prepaid orders to

E.R.A. T-shirts, 1802 NW 11th Road, Gainesville, FL 32605

Be sure to state men's and/or women's size.

Please send me the following T-shirt(s); I want to wear my committment to E.R.A.:

Quantity

Sex

Size

Name

Address

City/State/Zip

Enclosed is my check for $

which is %5.25 per shirt.

Send right away!

Constitutional Revision by Karen Minerva

The 1977 Convention of the League of Women Voters of Florida voted to reveiw and update "Florida Constitution"

Concurrence is an on-going process. When each of us is joined the League of Women Voters, we also concurred with positions already held by our local, state and national organizations. We accepted the validity of the consensus process: study, discussion, debate, consensus. We trust that the same amount of work has gone into the researching of a position as we would expect to do ourselves.

Those who were members in 1968 will recall that the League supported the 1968 revision even though we felt it had serious shortcomins. However, further revision seemed unlikely-- given political conditions at that time. Also, we were pelased that initiative was a part of the proposed revision (although it did need its own revision later.) Since 1968, we have been active in the reivion of the judicial article (limited merit selection and retention,) and financial disclosure (Sunshine.)

Summer reading for those preparing for fall concurrent should include the following basis texts:

Constitution Revision, 1977-78, LWVF Pub. #522, June 1977, 50 cents.

Our Florida Government, LWVFEF Pub. #700, June 1977, $1.

Study and Action, 1975-77, LWVF Pub. #365, June 1976, not $1, now 50 cents.

new publications

CONSTITUTION REVISION-- 1977-1978,

LWVF, Pub. #522, 19 pp., 50 cents.

This LWVF action publication outlines some League thinking about useful reforms which could be made in Florida's constitution and questions which merit consideration. Includes the major areas in which League has held positions for over tne years. Liberally quoted in the July 10, 1977 issue of the St. Petersburg Times. For every citizen concerned about the government of Florida and the document which is its backbone.

This book was written by Charlotte Hubbard of Dunedin, former LWVF Consitution Revision Chair, member of the Constitution Revision Commission and former member of the state Ethics Commission.

OUR FLORIDA GOVERNMENT LWVF Ed Fund, Pub. #700, 34 PP., $1

A three-in-one fact book that replaces Florida Government, What Price Florida Government, and Education in Florida. Only 34 pages long, this bright yellow and orange book by Arnetta Brown contains succinct chapters on the consitution, the three branches of government, taxes, elections, local government, property taxes and the Commission on Ethics-- with easy to read charts and graphs. An "every citizen" book which you'll want for yourself and as gifts to friends.

Order through your local League or send your check for $1.50 25 cents handling and postage to: League of Women Voters of Florida, 1035-S South Florida Avenue, Lakeland, FL 33803.


7

Dear Leaguers,

The office is in full swing in Lakeland, and Barbara Andrews, our new Executive Assitant here, will be answering most of your phone calls. The state board met after convention and plans are in gear for a full League year. We're betting on the future of the Equal Rights Amendment (E.R.A.) and we itend to be winners. The national League has launched its fundraising efforts to raise up to $1.5 million for E.R.A. campaigns in key unratified states. We in Florida are one of the four targeted areas. Already over $825,000 have been received in pledges from Leagues throughout the U.S. Your delegates to convention pledged $40,000 for Florida's share.

A state E.R.A. committee has been appointed and all Leagues will be receiving material on fund raising, educational materials and action tools. A good start would be for Leagues to hold units on the background material. Mary Anne Sherman, Action Vice President, will be directing the campaign. I hope that many members of the League will be active in the 1978 legislative campaigns.

While E.R.A. remains the top priority, the Constitutional Revision Commission has been selected. I am honored to serve along with another Leaguer, Jan Platt, Tampa Council woman who was honored at Convention as one of the many League leaders who have entered the political arena. Former state board member Charlotte Hubbard has also been named as an alternate. Every member should order our two new publications Constitution Revision (50cents), and our Florida Government ($1) from your local League publications chair or from the state office in Lakeland.

Our five state program items combined with our national studies present an enormous taks. But League has always risen to a tough challenge and our reprutation of 57 years demands that we continue to work as hard as ever.

From the enthusiasm and dedication shown by the delegates at convention, I know that we will all make the necessary sacrifices so that two years from now the next convention will have the enjoyment of celebrating our fantastic successes!

Sincerely

Lois Harrison

POSTMASTER: Send form 3579 to:

League of Women Voters of Florida

1035-S South Florida Avenue

Lakeland, FL 33803 813/682-1636

[Picture of] Lois c. Harrison

President

League of Women Voters of Florida

Source

State Archives of Florida: Series S79, Box 1, Folder 37

Description

A July-August 1977 pamphlet explaining the purpose of the Equal Rights Amendment; a message from lobbyist Mary Anne Sherman; the state program 1977-1979; and highlights from the 1977 convention. Members listed include Fran Boudolf, Ruth Ann Bramson, Arnetta Brown, Roxanna Dear, Deannie Picciotti, Judy Blankenship, Polly Doughty, Jean Martin, Sherry Newman, and Elise Webb.

Date

1977

Creator

League of Women Voters of Florida

Contributors

Harrison, Lois

Sherman, Mary Anne

Churchill, Lucile

Format

Pamphlets

Coverage

Modern Florida (1950-1990)

General Note

Passed by Congress in 1972, the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) proposed that "equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex." Though 35 states had ratified the ERA by the extended 1982 deadline, it still needed the support of a three-fourths majority, or 38 states, to amend the U.S. Constitution. In Florida, the amendment was introduced or voted on in every legislative session from 1972 until 1982. Though it passed the Florida House of Representatives on several occasions, it never passed the Senate. With the deadline fast approaching, Florida was one of four states to hold a special legislative session to decide on the fate of the ERA in the summer of 1982. While it passed the House (60-58), it again failed in the Senate with a 22-16 vote against ratification. It did not pass any of the other three state legislatures in special session that summer, and the ERA was defeated as a constitutional amendment.