"Scrapbook" by American Friends Service Committee, April 1960

"Scrapbook" by American Friends Service Committee, April 1960

Transcript

SCRAPBOOK
AMERICAN FRIENDS SERVICE COMMITTEE - MIDDLE ATLANTIC REGION
20 SOUTH 12TH STREET, PHILADELPHIA 7, PENNSYLVANIA
HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM - - - DICK HILER, DIRECTOR
VOLUME FIFTEEN, NUMBER 7
Subscription Rate $1 per year
April 1960
[NON-VIOLENT] RESISTANCE - A PLACE TO TAKE HOLD
For many years, concerned young people, both Negro and white, have regretted the racial inequalities that exist in our nation, but have felt that there was little an individual could do to correct them. That day is past. The Negro youth in the South have found a place to take hold.
The 'Sit-In' is not new. The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) has been using it for many years to integrate lunch counters and restaurants. Never before, however, has this non-violent direct action technique caught the imagination of so many people within our country. Thousands of Negro students are risking jail, physical assault, expulsion from school, and additional pressures and abuses in order to protest the injustices of the society in which they live. Some white students have joined the protests in the South, and across the nation, high school and college youth have engaged in orderly sympathy demonstrations, fundraising campaigns, the dispatching of messages to support to Southern students who have been arrested or expelled and statements of protest to chain stores, Southern governors, congressmen, city and school officials. On April 2, pickets marched in front of a majority of the 3,000 F. W. Woolworth stores throughout the nation in protest against the chain's segregated lunch counters in the South.
There is a place for you to take hold, if you are willing to join in this struggle for human rights. Find out what is being done in your own community by CORE, the National Student Association, NAACP, and other groups. Watch the New York Times for reports on what is happening in other cities. Organize your own demonstration or picket. Raise money for the United States National Student Association, Southern Scholarship and Defense Fund. (Send contributions to Paul DuBrull, c/o the fund, 3457 Chesnut Street, Philadelphia 4, Pa.) Circulate additional copies of April SPECTRUM and stimulate all the discussion you can on the subject. Write to encourage students in the South (names and schools involved in the N.Y. Times and other good newspapers) and to the national chains which permit segregated facilities. (Three suggestions below.) Let us know if you want more ideas or information. Not all the struggles for freedom are in South Africa, Hungary, Cuba or Bongo Bongo Land. We're in the middle of this one whether we live in the North or the South. Let's go with it!
R. C. Kirkwood, President
F. W. Woolworth
233 Broadway
New York, New York
Louis C. Lustenberger, President
W. T. Grant
1441 Broadway
New York, New York
Harry B. Cunningham, President
S. Kresge
370 Lexington Avenue
New York, New York

Source

State Archives of Florida: Collection N2015-1, Box 01, Folder 9

Description

"Scrapbook" newsletter, Volume 15, Number 7, on the topics of picketing, forms of civil disobedience and civil defense tactics. The envelope indicates that the newsletter was sent from Richard Hiler to Patricia Stephens.