CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 4

180812
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, August 23, 1858, Richard K. Call, Lake Jackson, to Ellen Call Long, Tallahassee, 1 p., brief note regarding local weather conditions and family matters.
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 4

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 1

180834
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, _____ 17, 1858, ''A.M.C.,'' Paris, to ''My Dear Friend,''regarding his visit to Scotland, where he saw ''this thing called a handsome [sketch accompanies the text], in which the driver sits behind in a small place and drives over the top of the handsome (one horse). It is not called a handsome because it really is so handsome, but it has simply taken the name of the inventor, who is not so good looking.'' Also mentions London and his impressions of Paris.
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 1

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 2

180835
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, July 5, 1858, Dr. John Jenkins, Hamilton, Canada, to Richard K. Call, 3 pp., thanking him for his ''kind and benevolent treatment to my Daughter. . .'' and asking ''what will be your price, as low as you can grant it to a Father'' for the freedom of Mary, Jenkins' daughter and Call's slave: ''Through the mysterious darkness that threw a veil between myself and children for many years -- Thanks be to the Great Father. It has pleased God of late to shed Light upon my path and open the way to hear from them, and also give a lenient heart to the owners of Martha to place her in my power to obtain her, for which they have my sincere thanks, and I feel anxious learn from your own pen, your mind and your price, if you will be so kind as to give me an answer.''
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 2

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 3

180836
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, August 5, 1858, John Jenkins, Hamilton, Canada, to Richard K. Call, 3 pp.: ''It is with the deepest emotions of gratitude Sir I acknowledge the receipt of your letter, giving your consent to let me have my Daughter Mary [and for] the moderation of your price. . . Please let me know by letter when you are ready and what day she will leave Tallahassee. . . Please give my respects to Mary, tell her, her friends are awaiting her arrival with great anxiety, thinking it almost an impossibility that the two Sisters should ever again be reunited on Earth.''
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 3

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 7

180852
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Draft of Letter, November 1, 1860, Richard K. Call, Lake Jackson, to Mr. Hart (editor, Tallahassee Sentinel newspaper), 12 pp., explicating at length his unionist, pro-slavery views in response to ''your remarks on the speech delivered by me . . . on the 29th. . . I did not advocate resistance to the inauguration of Mr. Lincoln. . . a measure which, if adopted, must precipitate our country in to civil war. . . for which the South is . . . unprepared. . . If Mr. Lincoln should be elected, it will not be by a majority of the American people. It will be the result of fortuitous circumstances . . . from the unhappy division of the Nation in to four contending parties, of which his may chance to be the most numerous. And although I shall regard him as a usurper . . . I hold the peace and safety of the country too dear, and the preservation of our glorious union too sacred, to place it in jeopardy, by one rash and precipitate action . . . the principles of popular government, and the cause of civil and religious liberty throughout the world, all depend on the result of our deliberation, our decision and our action. . . If the conservative elements will all combine, if the three defeated factions will all unite in the holy cause of their country, if they will cease . . . to make war on each other, and unite in opposition to the Black Republican Administration it will be powerless. . . the principle of any southern man is favorable to the institution of African Slavery. . . the Black Republican party [has] perverted our Declaration of Independence, they have willfully . . . misinterpreted our Constitution. They have applied the Declaration of Independence to the African race; they have sought to make the Constitution . . . yield to their false theory. . . while the Constitution . . . recognizes our property in African slaves. . . they assert through the principles of the Declaration of Independence that our slaves are born free, that they are equals. . . Can any one doubt this design in this perversion of the Declaration of Independence, which was intended by our fathers to apply only to the white man, to our own Anglo Saxon race? . . . I am for trying every honorable expedient to save the Union. . . but in the mean time I am for making every preparation for war. War in the field if it must be, war at the Ballot Boxes. . . manifest our firm determination to maintain our Constitutional government in all its purity or perish with it. . . I would suspend all social and commercial intercourse between Florida and the North during the Administration of Mr. Lincoln. . . Let the people of Florida will it, and it can be done. And if they do not will it, let them cease to complain of the tribute they pay to the North. . . the institution of African Slavery has become the great agency of civilization . . . it is feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, and administering to the wants and necessities of the whole civilized world. . . it is sending commerce and civilization to barbarous tribes and . . . carrying Christianity into heathen lands. . .''
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 7

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 8

180854
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, November 5, 1860, Richard Call Long to his mother Ellen Call Long, 3 pp., regarding progress in his lessons: ''I suppose that you will have received my report . . . so that I need hardly tell you any thing more concerning my lessons. . . we had a list of Prepositions to recite and I was the only boy who was able to recite them . . . pleas give my love to Grandfather and sister Mary and the baby and Mr. Brevard and all the servants. . .''
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 8

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 9

180857
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, December 22, 1860, Richard K. Call, Lake Jackson, to Mr. Hart (editor, Tallahassee Sentinel newspaper), printed as a 1-page broadside: ''. . . never at any time, or on any occasion within the last ten years, have I seen so much unanimity, so much enthusiasm, in the support of the glorious American Union, as on this day, appointed for its destruction by political leaders. . . There are no men in your State, sir, who will resent an insult, or avenge a wrong to Florida, with more . . . spirit and pride than they. There are none who will resist the Black Republicans with more firmness and energy -- none who will take up arms sooner -- none who will fight more bravely, under the stars and the stripes of the Union; but they will not be led like slaves -- they will not be lead, or driven, into revolution, rebellion and treason against their country . . . I doubt not, sir, that [their voice] is the voice of nine-tenths of the working men of Florida. . . They will never yield any constitutional guarantee of African slavery -- but they will ''submit'' to the law while it is constitutional, and they will maintain the Union while it is constitutional . . .'' Following this is a postscript dated December 23 in which Call announces a ''Glorious anniversary of a glorious night, Jackson's first victory on the banks of the Mississippi. The 8th day of January 1861 will be celebrated at the Lake Jackson Church. . . a day of thanksgiving to God -- a day of honor and gratitude to the memory of the great Chief. A Portrait of General Jackson taken 35 years ago will be displaed under a banner bearing a Star for every State of the Union, which has not ''"ified'' the Fugitive Slave law and denied the Supreme jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of the United States. . .'' [Copies also in Box 3, File Folder 23, and Box 5, File Folder 6, Item 4]
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 9

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 5

180839
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, May 17, 1860, Mary Jane Higgins, Hamilton, to ''Dear Husband'' (apparently a slave of Richard Call at Lake Jackson), 2 pp.: ''I received a letter from Master some time since in which he informs me that you are well. . . I hope you will still look up to god as your supporter and your friend and I try to do the same and. . . altho' separated in person I trust we will be present in spirit. You will give my love to Master and to miss Ellen and miss Mary. I dare say Master is lonesome since his house has become so quiet but I am certain he has one Friend who will cheer him . . . give my love to all my acquaintances and friends . . . My Father and mother sister Martha and brother Jefferson join me in love to Master and you. I hope to hear from you soon and beleive me to be your faithful and devoted wife . . . P.S. I have sent along with this a few lines from my own pen of my first writing as I thought it would please Master and you to see I am trying to learn something.''
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 5

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 6

180843
Collection
Call and Brevard Family Papers
Description
Letter, July 12, 1860, Richard K. Call, Tallahassee, to his grandson Richard Call Long, encouraging him in his studies: ''If you continue to apply your energies you cannot fail to learn. Your hand-writing is greatly improved, and your spelling and diction are both very good, but still both may be made more perfect by practice. . . I am desirous that you should become a good Latin and French schollar, Greek too is desirable, but above all I am anxious that you should understand the sciences and specially mathamatics. . . Learn all you can, and spend as little idle time as possible. Time is more valuable than money, knowledge better than power. . . I suppose you would like to hear something about home. The Lake is falling, but yet not low enough to cross. . . I left home this morning and took breakfast with your sister and Mr. Brevard. . . Cotton is smaller than usual, but it has yet four months to grow . . . Your poney is in fine plight, and much stouter than you ever saw him, and your dogs are all in good condition. . .'' [Bottom half of last page missing: text lost]
: 1 Folder: 6 Item: 6

Narrow Your Results

Collection

Call and Brevard Family Papers
[X]

Tip: If you would like to find catalog records which include either of two terms, you can separate those terms with the uppercase word OR.

Example: Miami OR Dade