Oral history with Vivian Hall Boston

240477
Date
01/28/1990
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
13
Hurston, Zora Neale

Oral history with Harriett Mosley

240479
Date
01/27/1990
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
16
Hurston, Zora Neale

Oral history with Annie Lue Davis

240478
Date
01/27/1990
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
14-15
Hurston, Zora Neale

Oral history with Mildred Board

240476
Date
01/26/1990
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
12
Hurston, Zora Neale

Oral history with John French

240475
Date
1990-01-02
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
11
Hurston, Zora Neale

Gabriel Brown playing guitar as Rochelle French and Zora Neale Hurston listen- Eatonville, Florida

107444
Date
1935
Collection
Florida Photographic Collection
Image Number
FA0514
Hurston, Zora Neale

Saturday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Narrative Stage) (Tape 10)

239729
Date
1996-05-25
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One audio cassette tape. Stetson Kennedy (introduced by Tina Bucuvalas) discusses the WPA and projects they conducted in Florida recording early songs and stories of the state. He notes that minorities were included in the project and speaks of the contributions of Zora Neale Hurston in collecting early history. He also discusses the 1936 Keys Hurricane and working with Allen Lomax.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C96-70
Hurston, Zora Neale

Zora Neale Hurston's grave site

236551
Date
1987
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Four color slides. Zora Neale Hurston was a major literary figure, known as one of the nation's preeminent African American writers, with such titles as Their Eyes Were Watching God. She was from Eatonville, and had studied anthropology under Franz Boaz. In 1959, after suffering a stroke, Hurston was forced to enter a welfare home where she died in 1960. She was buried in an unmarked grave and her work languished in relative obscurity until 1975, when famed novelist Alice Walker published the article "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston" in Ms. magazine. In the article, Walker recounts her experiences of searching for, finding, and marking Hurston's grave. The Florida Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1987 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalis, Steve Fragos, Merri Belland, and Barbara Seitz as preliminary research for a joint folk art between the Florida Folklife Program and the Florida Museum of History. The field researchers focused on those areas previously overlooked by FFP staff. The research focused on identifying folk artists and locating appropriate exhibit objects.
Type
Still Image
Hurston, Zora Neale

Gabriel Brown & Rochelle French performance for the WPA Federal Writers' Project

296522
Date
1935-06
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Two reel-to-reel tapes. Brown (guitar, vocals) and French (guitar, vocals) perform blues songs. These recordings were made as part of the first Works Progress Administration's (WPA) Federal Writers' Project (FWP) recording expedition in Florida, conducted by Lomax, Hurston, and Barnicle. These recordings are copies of acetate disks housed in the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, numbered AFS 355 through 361, side A. While the full recording is unedited, some of the track selections have been spliced where skipping or dropouts occurred.
Type
sound
Item ID
T86-235a
Item ID
T86-234c
Hurston, Zora Neale

Unidentified young African American girls performance for the WPA Federal Writers' Project

296523
Date
1935-06
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
First part of one reel-to-reel tape. A group of unidentified African American girls perform children's songs unaccompanied. These recordings were made as part of the first Works Progress Administration's (WPA) Federal Writers' Project (FWP) recording expedition in Florida, conducted by Lomax, Hurston, and Barnicle. These recordings are from a copy of an acetate disk housed in the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, numbered AFS 349. While the full recording is unedited, some of the track selections have been spliced where skipping or dropouts occurred.
Type
sound
Item ID
T86-234a
Hurston, Zora Neale

Unidentified Eatonville Methodist church service & musical performance for the WPA Federal Writers' Project

296632
Date
1935-06
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Second part of one reel-to-reel tape. Jones, Marshall, Henry, and Goldie perform religious songs accompanied by unidentified singers. Rev. Haynes and a visiting pastor conduct a religious service for an unidentified Methodist church in Eatonville, Fla. These recordings were made as part of the first Works Progress Administration's (WPA) Federal Writers' Project (FWP) recording expedition in Florida, conducted by Lomax, Hurston, and Barnicle. These recordings are copies of acetate disks housed in the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, numbered AFS 350 through 354. While the full recording is unedited, some of the track selections have been spliced where skipping or dropouts occurred.
Type
sound
Item ID
T86-234b
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA recordings featuring Zora Neale Hurston

238862
Date
1935
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One audio cassette. (Also on C87-24.) Compilation of all of the Zora Neale Hurston-related WPA recordings. The originals are housed at the Library of Congress. She worked for the WPA in 1935 and in 1939. Zora Neale Hurston was a major literary figure, known as one of the nation's preeminent African American writers, with such titles as Their Eyes Were Watching God. She was from Eatonville, and had studied anthropology under Franz Boaz. In 1959, after suffering a stroke, Hurston was forced to enter a welfare home where she died in 1960. She was buried in an unmarked grave and her work languished in relative obscurity until 1975, when famed novelist Alice Walker published the article "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston" in Ms. magazine. For more on Hurston, see the FloridaMemory web page: http://www.floridamemory.com/OnlineClassroom/zora_hurston/
Type
Sound
Item ID
C85-18
Item ID
C87-24*
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Calhoun County (1935 recording expedition)

238001
Date
1935
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. (A audio cassette of Zora Neale Hurston's performances can be found on S 1576, C87-24; and an unnumbered tape in box 41.) These recordings were from the 1935 expedition by Lomax, Hurston, and Barnicle in Calhoun County. This was the first of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Conrwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-237
Hurston, Zora Neale

Interview with Stetson Kennedy

238740
Date
1981-09-22
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Three reel to reel recordings. In the interview, Kennedy discusses Stanley Papio; the WPA and the Federal Writers Project; working with anthropologist/writer Zora Neale Hurston; Carita Doggett Corse; collecting folklife during the 1930s; painter Mario Sanchez; his many books; infiltrating the KKK; work with labor unions; and the reprinting of the Folk Songs of Florida by Alton Morris, and Kennedy's Palmetto Country. Stetson Kennedy was one of the earliest folklorists working in Florida. Born in 1916, the Jacksonville native began collecting Northeast Florida folk sayings as a teenager. After a stint at the University of Florida, Kennedy joined the Florida WPA Writers Project in 1937 to administer the folklore, oral history, and ethnic studies section. Among the workers he supervised was novelist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. Soon thereafter he published Palmetto Country, an exploration of Florida folklife edited by Erskine Caldwell. His papers from the WPA are housed within the Florida Folklife Collection. Although he remained a lifelong folklife supporter, in the 1940s and 1950s, Kennedy also worked to end Jim Crow laws and helped exposed the Ku Klux Klan with several publications. The recipient of many awards, including the Florida Folk Heritage Award and the NAACP Freedom Award, he was also the subject of Library of Congress' folklorist Peggy Bulger's dissertation. Among his books are Southern Exposure, The Klan Unmasked, and South Florida Folklife, co-authored with Bulger and Tina Bucuvalas. Bulger wrote her dissertation on Kennedy. Copied onto C81-71, C81-72 & C81-73.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T81-101
Item ID
T81-100
Item ID
T81-116
Hurston, Zora Neale

Storytellers at the 1994 Florida Folk Festival (Storytelling Auditorium) (Saturday)

239562
Date
1994-05-28
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Six audio cassette recordings. Storytellers spoke between 10:00am and 2pm at the Storytelling Auditorium. The coordinator was Peggy Smith. (The Storytelling Tent area, coordinated by Nancy Case, and featuring some of the same storytellers, was not recorded.) Larkin, of Atlanta, spoke twice; the first time to fill in for the two absent storytellers: John Johnson and Margie Baldwin. Cappa, (of Williamsport, PA), Roy (of Fort Myers), and Rivers (of Ybor City) were audience members participating in the Cousin Thelma Story Swap. Harshbarger, of Tallahassee, used finger puppets in her presentation. Smith and Seaman were from Jacksonville. Louis resided in Miami.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C94-34
Item ID
C94-35
Item ID
C94-36
Item ID
C94-37
Item ID
C94-38
Item ID
C94-39
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Jacksonville (1939 recording expedition: Herbert Halpert)

238024
Date
1939-06-18
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. (These recordings appear at the end of the reel. The rest of the reel is another WPA expedition.)All of Zora Neale Hurston's Florida recordings can be found on C87-24, including those on this reel. These recordings were created by folklorist Halpert -- originally of New York City, and later a pioneer in the field, in June 1939. This was part of a larger nine-state fieldwork tour of the South between 12 March and 30 June 1939. He created a total of twelve 12-inch acetate records in Florida. On this recording, Halpert was assisted by Stetson Kennedy in Jacksonville. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-243
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Eatonville and Belle Glade (1935 recording expedition)

237999
Date
1935
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-235
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Belle Glade (1935 recording expedition)

238000
Date
1935
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-236
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Calhoun County and Raiford (the 1935, and the 1936-1937 recording expeditions)

238002
Date
1935
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. (Copied onto audio cassette C87-23; and an unnumbered tape in Box 41, in S 1576) These recordings were from the 1935 expedition by Lomax, Hurston, and Barnicle in Calhoun County, and John Lomax's 1936 expedition at the Florida State Prison in Raiford. These were the first of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-256
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Jacksonville (1939 recording expedition: Herbert Halpert)

238022
Date
1939-06-18
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by folklorist Halpert -- originally of New York City, and later a pioneer in the field, in June 1939. This was part of a larger nine-state fieldwork tour of the South between 12 March and 30 June 1939. He created a total of twelve 12-inch acetate records in Florida. On this recording, Halpert was assisted by Stetson Kennedy. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-244
Hurston, Zora Neale

WPA field recordings in Jacksonville and Ybor City (1939 recording expedition: Herbert Halpert)

238023
Date
1939-06-18
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. (These recordings appear at the start of the reel. The rest of the reel is another WPA expedition.) All of Zora Neale Hurston's Florida recordings can be found on C87-24, including those on this reel. These recordings were created by folklorist Halpert -- originally of New York City, and later a pioneer in the field, in June 1939. This was part of a larger nine-state fieldwork tour of the South between 12 March and 30 June 1939. He created a total of twelve 12-inch acetate records in Florida. On this recording, Halpert was assisted by Stetson Kennedy in Jacksonville. In Ybor City, he recorded Cuban drummer Bermudez. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-245
Hurston, Zora Neale

Recording of the In the Nick of Time Conference on Florida Folklife and the WPA

239145
Date
1989-02-04
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
"Eleven audio cassettes. Recording of a conference regarding the value of the WPA (and the Florida Writer's Project) to Florida Folklife. The fieldwork conducted by the WPA from 1935 through 1943 can be found at the Library of Congress, as well as duplicates in S 1576. (Use this database to locate them.) C89-1: Stetson Kennedy discusses the WPA in Florida; "apartheid" [segregation] in Florida; Florida at the time of the Depression; his introduction to folklore; various stories on various places in Florida; race and gender in the WPA in Florida. (Dale Olson features as emcee throughout series) C89-2: Stetson Kennedy continues his talk with a discussion of methodology, Zora Neale Hurston, and how the NEH and NEA have a different formula than the WPA. Alan Jabbour plays music and discusses his background as a native Floridian from Miami. Sources for Florida folk materials are discussed and music is played ("The Sloop John B" is specifically named). C89-3: Alan Jabbour continues discussing songs of various ethnic origins, such as Slovakian, Minorcan, and Greek. Ann Banks discusses her background as a Florida native and tells stories. She also discusses re-issued stories from the FWP, such as Benjamin Botkin and his emphasis on literary realism; WPA writers as pioneers. C89-4: Anne Banks continues with stories. Alan Lomax discusses the background of what had been said previously; the "century of the common man"; various people involved with the WPA including FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt; archives and records; Woody Guthrie and his song, "Going Where the Climate Suits My Clothes"; WPA writers and John Lomax's involvement in beginning of the Slave Narrative Collection; difficulties and risks in gathering folklore; importance of folklore to the public sector. C89-5: Alan Lomax continues discussing fieldwork with African Americans; Zora Neale Hurston (he also performs one of the songs she collected); Stetson Kennedy and his work with the program; the dangers of fieldwork; importance of oldest documents; living in the black community; African instruments; songs he collected (particularly blues). C89-6: Gary Mormino speaks on aspects of the WPA relating to African Americans. He specifically discusses Stetson Kennedy; the Ex-Slave Club of Miami; WPA bill of 1935; Florida's part in the project; African American writing unit; Sterling Brown; slave narratives collected between 1936 and 1938 and Florida's slave narratives; non-published interviews; poor whites; faith in the African American church; social fabric of plantation-community life; learning to read; retaining African customs; African American community life in interviews; differences between Georgia and Alabama as seen in narratives and American history. C89-7: Ron Foreman continues with the discussion on African Americans and the WPA, focusing on the role of the African American writers unit in Florida; emerging Florida materials; Clara White Mission; the three field workers studying African Americans in Florida in 1937; Zora Neale Hurston's importance to the project. Barbara Speisman continues the discussion with references to her own background and stories about Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. C89-8: Barbara Speisman continues with a comparison of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. David Kaufelt discusses the WPA Guide as a resource for writers and its different contents. He focuses on the Florida historical novel; the tour section; African Americans in the Guide; "The Golden Wedding"; winter season; sports and recreation; the Guide as providing a skeleton of Florida history; failings of the Guide including economic and racist fears; anti-Semitism and the lack of reference to Jews in the Guide; the mechanics of putting together the Guide; the Guide as a "very good resource for Florida." C89-9: Peggy Bulger discusses the establishment of the FWP; the search for useable past and bicentennial celebration; American Folklife Preservation Act; establishment of the Florida Folklife Programs and the FWP. Ann Banks discusses ethnic hatred and strength; history of and comparison between the Florida Folklife Program and the FWP; field materials of the Florida Folklife Program; state pride through folklife material; works of the Florida Folklife Program; new ideas of the FWP; New Deal's policy; similarities of work today; cultural conservation and folklife work; products that meet needs of folk culture and government sponsored agency; FWP materials; comparison of FWP and Florida Folklife Program benefits; problems of the New Deal folklorists and those of today. C89-10: Ormond Loomis reads excerpts from the collection entitled "Cracker"; responds to the condition of materials; collection of the WPA at the Florida Folklife Program. A question and answer session brings comments on various subjects from Alan Lomax, Ann Banks, Peggy Bulger, Cheryl Cannon, and Ormond Loomis. Topics include exploitation by the middle class and the spirit of natural folklore; feeding back into the communities; trends; the NEA; the State of Florida and folklore; the good of White Springs. C89-11: Question and answer session continues with comments from Stetson Kennedy, Alan Lomax, Peggy Bulger, Catherine Sugrue, Dale Olson, Alan Jabbour and Ron Foreman. Topics include materials in curriculum; money as a concern for folklorists; the Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs; preservation; schools."
Type
Sound
Item ID
C89-1
Item ID
C89-2
Item ID
C89-3
Item ID
C89-4
Item ID
C89-5
Item ID
C89-6
Item ID
C89-7
Item ID
C89-8
Item ID
C89-9
Item ID
C89-10
Item ID
C89-11
Hurston, Zora Neale

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