Interview with jazz and blues saxophone player John Boller

238251
Date
1981-12-01
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Boller talks about his background and his knowledge of the jazz and blues music tradition in Pensacola; his start as a musician; jam sessions at the Savoy club in Pensacola; the Royal Club in Pensacola; playing a variety of musical styles in his band; the first jazz piece he played, "Long, Long Ago," and his favorite jazz pieces; making a living as a professional musician; having Hal Andrews as a high school teacher; and his father's interest in music. Copied onto audiocassette C83-49. 
Type
Sound
Item ID
T83-151
Horn music

Interview with jazz and blues drummer Clyde Andrews

238252
Date
1981-12-02
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. Andrews, son of musician Harold Andrews and a Pensacola native, discusses his interest in music as a child; the similarities between various styles of music; playing progressive jazz, rock and roll, swing and other music styles; learning to read music; his favorite jazz styles and his opinions on other types of music; the public's interest in jazz music; improvisation; drumming; Charles Marby, a drummer; and playing brass instruments. The cassette is damaged and does not play well. Copied onto audiocassette C83-50.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T83-150
Horn music

WPA field recordings in Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

238031
Date
1940-01-23
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording Rolle plays with his band on several Bahamian folk songs. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-247
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/Collections/folklife/folklife

WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)

238032
Date
1940-01
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording Rolle plays with his band on several Bahamian folk songs in Key West; White telling stories and songs; and the 85 year old Barnwell, who grew up on a plantation in Nassau County. She tells stories of her 'mammies,' and sings songs from her childhood. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T86-248
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/Collections/folklife/folklife

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