Jackson County Library Program: Agriculture

238295
Date
1983-07-21
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Two audio cassettes. Recording of a program for the Jackson County Library on family agriculture and turpentining for the "Pursuits and Pastimes" series. The program, led by Doris Dyen, consists of discussions on basketry; growing herbs and spices; hunting for snakes; folk games; and cultural differences amongst ethnic groups. Includes talks by Fred Williams and Lloyd McMullian. On tape C83-124, McMullian discusses hog farming; preparing and curing hogs; President Hoover and life during the Great Depression; African Americans and voting; company stores; and ways to farm and uses for turpentine.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C83-123
Item ID
C83-124
Great Depression

Folklife Subject: Works Progress Administration

274025
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Type
interactive resource
, public works, Great Depression

Folklife People: Zora Neale Hurston

274009
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Zora Neale Hurston was an African-American novelist whose rich literary work has inspired generations of readers. Despite her reputation as a writer, there exists another side to Hurston's career. In 1938 and 1939, during the Great Depression, Hurston worked as a folklorist and contributor to the Florida division of the Federal Writers' Project (FWP), part of the Works Progress Administration. Through her work with the FWP, Hurston captured stories, songs, traditions and histories from African-Americans in small communities across Florida, whose stories often failed to make it into the histories of that time period.
Type
interactive resource
the Great Depression, Hurston

Folklife People: Washboard Bill Cooke

274005
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
William "Washboard Bill" Cooke was born in Dupont, Florida, on July 4, 1905. He was known as a percussionist, as well as a captivating storyteller rooted in the minstrel tradition. During Cooke's childhood, his mother operated a juke joint in Dupont. The young Cooke would secretly stay up past his bedtime listening to the music. These experiences influenced his rhythmic style. In 1916, Mrs. Cooke closed her juke joint, and sent her children to live on their grandfather's farm in Sanford, Florida. During the Great Depression, Cooke grew weary of his life on the farm, and decided to leave home. For 10 years, he led the life of a hobo, traveling by train all over the East Coast and generally spending his winters in West Palm Beach. Between 1947 and 1963, he performed with the West Palm Beach Washboard Band. They played in venues everywhere from the streets, to the estates of the Rockefellers and Kennedys. In 1956, he recorded Washboard Country Band with Sonny Terry, and folk legend, Pete Seeger.
Type
interactive resource
/collections/folklife/people/?id=washboard_bill

Interview with Ida Sessions

238286
Date
1983-05-05
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One audio cassette. Sessions, a quilter, was born in Winston County, Alabama, and was eighty-two years old at the time of the interview. In the interview, she discusses coming to Winter Garden, Florida, in the 1920s; learning to quilt from her mother; the tools and methods used in quilting; and quilting patterns such as "rail fence", "trip around the world", "butterfly," "girl with umbrella" and others. In addition, she describes growing up on a farm and planting crops by signs and omens.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C83-106
Great Depression

Forest Oakes demonstrating broom making at the 1988 Florida Folk Festival - White Springs, Florida

110591
Date
1988
Collection
Florida Photographic Collection
Image Number
FA4701
Folklife collection

Forest Oakes demonstrating broom making at the 1988 Florida Folk Festival - White Springs, Florida

110592
Date
1988
Collection
Florida Photographic Collection
Image Number
FA4702
Folklife collection

Storytellers at the 1997 Florida Folk Festival (Storytelling Tent) (Saturday)

239843
Date
1997-05-24
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
14 audio cassette recordings. Storytellers spoke between 10:00am and 5pm at the Storytelling Tent. (The Storytelling Auditorium area, which featured some of the same storytellers, was not recorded.) Bruce served as the emcee. Several of the storytellers also sang songs.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C97-112
Item ID
C97-113
Item ID
C97-114
Item ID
C97-115
Item ID
C97-116
Item ID
C97-117
Item ID
C97-118
Item ID
C97-119
Item ID
C97-120
Item ID
C97-121
Item ID
C97-122
Item ID
C97-123
Item ID
C97-124
Item ID
C97-125
Great Depression

Saturday program at the 1997 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Narrative Stage) (Tape 4)

239904
Date
1997-05-24
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One audio cassette recordings. Sax Kari (a.k.a. "Candied Yams") is interviewed by Brent Tozzer. He discusses his childhood in New Orleans and the blues and jazz influences on his life (such as Benny Goodman and Charlie Christian). He speaks about learning music (specifically piano from Fats Waller) and early groups in which he played. He also discusses the various terms used for African-Americans and their changes over time as well as growing up during the Depression and his first job with the WPA.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C97-74
Great Depression

Interview with sugar cane farmer Ruth Wedgworth

236915
Date
1987-10-05
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Two audio cassettes. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Type
Sound
Great Depression

Interview with blues singer/pianist Ida Goodson

238864
Date
1981-11-26
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Three reel to reels. A second interview with singer and pianist Ida Goodson (the first can be found on T82-1 through T82-4). Born and raised in Pensacola, she toured and recorded with various blues and jazz bands in the late 1920s and 1930s, and later worked for a lumber company for 35 years, while still playing the nightclubs. She converted to Christianity in 1960 and began playing gospel music. In the interview, she discusses and demonstrates various music styles (jazz, blues, gospel, ragtime); learning songs; her first blues song (One Finger Blues); performers she knew and played with (Duke Ellington, Charlie Segar, Jimmy Cox, Helen Jackson, Mack Thomas); difference between blues and gospel; and gospel quartets in Pensacola in the 1920s. Copied onto audiocassettes C83-10, C83-11, and C83-12.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T82-12
Item ID
T82-13
Item ID
T82-14
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife/folklife

Interview with Fred Williams

238285
Date
1983-04-16
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Two audio cassettes. C83-104: Williams, born in Sneads, Florida, in 1923, discusses being raised in a rural farming family in Jackson County, Florida; joining the Army and using his disabled veterans' pension to start his own farm; the character of his family; life during the "Hoover Days" of the Depression; the Wesleyan Church creating a sense of civic community; farming under President Roosevelt's government policies; serving in the military and being injured in Europe during World War Two; being disabled; family sayings; and sacred harp singing in northern Alabama. In addition, he also talks about hog killing, smoking meat, mule plowing and other routines on the farm. C83-105: Williams talks about making homemade brooms; giving homemade brooms and bonnets to the elderly; the proliferation of modern technology; physical and mental challenges involved in farming; attending church revivals and going fishing in the summertime; training mules; and serenadings, weddings, and cane grindings. In addition, he remarks upon black quartet singing, his marriage, his political career and political outlook, and his religious views, including his outlook on the bible, Israel, and his favorable regard for Jews.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C83-104
Item ID
C83-105
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife/folklife

Interview with fiddle player Richard Seaman

235323
Date
1988-08-10
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One audio cassette. Seaman, an old-time fiddle player who grew up in Kissimmee, playing at square dances. He moved to Jacksonville in 1922, and spent his life working for the railroads. He discusses learning how to play the fiddle; playing for square dances; earning a living through music in the Depression; memorizing tunes; working for the railroads; dance tunes; beaters; local musicians; dance traditions in North Florida; German music in area; fiddle contests; playing in Jacksonville; and various tall tales. For an example of his playing (with Jack Piccalo), see S 1618, box 5, tape 7. For images of Seaman, see S 1577, v.54. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Duval County was a joint venture between the Duval County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was started in 1984 by folklorist David Taylor with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, and in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist which included visits by local folk artists. Taylor ran it until 1986. In 1988, Gregory Hansen re-initiated it with minor changes.
Type
Sound
Item ID
Tape 6
Great Depression

Interview with Lloyd Earl McMullian, Sr.

238284
Date
1983-04-16
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Two audio cassettes. C83-102: Macmillan discussed how Two Egg, Florida, and Paramour, Florida, were named; his birth in Grand Ridge, Florida, in 1910; his and his father's work in turpentining; getting into the farming business after the turpentining industry's decline; farming with mules and, later, with tractors in the 1930s; raising peanuts, soy beans, and corn; his son's work in cattle farming; blacksmithing; canning and preserving food; and magic and omens in farming. He also tell stories about voting Republican due to promises of racial equality and talks about "Hoover Days" and the Depression; old farming sayings and practices; and making moonshine from cane skimmings. C83-103: McMullian discusses visiting the Florida Folk Festival; collecting antique engines as a hobby; the turpentining process; tally calls and tally boards; "raking" trees; enjoying his work in the turpentine industry; bank loans; and trains and business transportation. In addition, he tells a story about the first toilet he ever saw and talks about losing crops in droughts and from nematodes; his father's employment in a large farm; fiddle and piano music and dances; Sacred Harp music; African-Americans; square dancing and clogging; serenades, housewarmings, and quilting parties; and farming in cold weather.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C83-102
Item ID
C83-103
Great Depression

Interview with blues singer/pianist Ida Goodson

238863
Date
1981-11-03
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Four reel to reels. Interview with singer and pianist Ida Goodson. Born and raised in Pensacola, she toured and recorded with various blues and jazz bands in the late 1920s and 1930s, and later worked for a lumber company for 35 years, while still playing the nightclubs. She converted to Christianity in 1960 and began playing gospel music. In the interview, she discusses her family; her sisters experiences in the music business; learning to play piano; her first song; blues, Dixieland, and jazz music in the 1920s and 1930s; touring Alabama and Georgia in the 1930s; Florida nightclubs; her marriage in 1927; her children's involvement in music; growing up in the Baptist Church and her religious reawakening in the 1960s; recording in New Orleans; games she played as a child; and May Day and Mardi Gras celebrations in Pensacola. Copied onto audiocassettes C83-1, C83-2, C83-3, and C83-4.
Type
Sound
Item ID
T82-4
Item ID
T82-3
Item ID
T82-1
Item ID
T82-2
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife/folklife

Interview with shrimpers Robert Lannon and Jean Vangoidstnoven (aka Capt. Van)

238896
Date
1984-07-22
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
One audio cassette. Robert Lannon discusses the Fernandina shrimping industry in its early days (1930s?); differences between prices for shrimp then and now; shrimp becoming more of a commercial product for export to other cities in the US such as New York and the importance of Italian (Italian-American?) shrimpers in this process; difficulties in the shrimping business during the Great Depression; his belief that Fernandina Beach was the first area where commercial shrimping took place; best times and places to catch shrimp; effects of pollution on the Fernandina shrimping industry. Capt. Van discusses the technicalities of shrimping at length, including: state laws governing nets; where one can fish; live bait fishing; different licenses needed for shrimping; bio-catch; the cost of operating a shrimping business; cost of shrimp; and other such topics. He also speaks about his own preferences in shrimping and nets, the Organized Fishermen of Florida (OFF), his personal history, and the way he operates his own shrimping business. Interviews conducted during fieldwork for video documentary on Florida shrimping called Fishing All My Days, and was made by the Florida Folklife Program, and the University of Florida (WUFT-TV). A transcript of the interview can be found in S 1579, box 1, folder: C86-99 through C86-149.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C86-148
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife/folklife

Washboard Bill Cooke story: A Hobo's Birthday

236883
Date
1988-01-02
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Two audio cassettes. Cooke telling a story of travelling on trains on his birthday during the Great Depression. Born in Dupont, just south of St. Augustine, on 4 July. His mother ran a jook joint, where he was first exposed to music and dance. He hoboed, played street music, worked for railways, and played at nightclubs in South Florida. In 1956, he made a recording with Pete Seeger and Sonny Terry called Washboard Country Band. In 1992, he won the Florida Folk Heritage Award. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Type
Sound
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife/folklife

Interview with cypress furniture maker Robert James Rudd

236656
Date
1986-09-14
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Three audio cassettes. A former construction worker who was born in Boynton Beach, Rudd built wicker furniture from cypress. Originally the cypress was local, but as development increased, he began acquiring the wood areas north of him. Few power tools were used to make the furniture. In the interview he discusses his father's furniture making career; types of furniture made; tools used; selling furniture; growing during the Depression in South Florida; Cedar Key; the loss of timber sources; the Florida East Coast railway; his career in the US Navy; frog and alligator hunting; snakes; and furniture made from grapevine. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Type
Sound
Great Depression

Interview with Donnie Gader

238519
Date
1984-10-24
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Four audio cassettes. C84-118: Audio is quiet on interviewer at the start. Donnie Gader recollects songs from her childhood and how she learned them, including: "Rosewood Casket"; "Lilac Trees"; "I'm a Little Curly Head" (rhyme); lullabyes; "The Shoemakers"; "Good Morning, Merry Sunshine"; songs about Jessie James; "Pollywollydoodle"; "Southern Lullabye"; discusses racial words in songs; songs learned from black community: "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"; hymns: "Amazing Grace"; "Rock of Ages"; song about a circus bear; learning songs from school teachers; "The Raggedy Man" (poem); and others. C84-119: Donnie Gader talks about home butchering; home remedies such as cornmeal gruel, pot liquor, fevergrass, Jerusalem oat root, dog fennels, and others; the local doctor; planting by the signs; farm living and crafts; games; talks about her journal; Christmas songs such as "Up on the Housetop"; "Jolly Old St. Nicholas"; Christmas tree traditions; making kites with flour and water for glue; her father and working with him at the gristmill; changes in fashion when she was young; life during the Great Depression and afterwards; various jobs she held in a sewing factory and packaging/locker plant. C84-120: Donnie Gader begins by discussing her family history; talks about the cotton gin, gristmill, and shingle mill her family ran; milking cows and making butter; butchering and the community aspect of it; peanut boiling and the community aspect of it; learning music by ear; discusses her second husband's French/Minorcan heritage; datil peppers. C84-121: Donnie Gader discusses and sings songs such as "Frankie and Johnnie"; "After the Ball"; "Down at the Old Garden Gate"; "The Old Rusty Mill" [?]; singing in the cottonfields; racism in cotton picking; song about a bole weevil; talks about her father and family history [sounds as if she reads from her journal at times]; father's talents as a musician; sings songs he sang: "Love Lifted Me"; "What A Friend We Have in Jesus"; community "sings"; foods.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C84-118
Item ID
C84-119
Item ID
C84-120
Item ID
C84-121
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife/folklife

Storytellers at the 1994 Florida Folk Festival (Storytelling Auditorium) (Saturday)

239562
Date
1994-05-28
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
Six audio cassette recordings. Storytellers spoke between 10:00am and 2pm at the Storytelling Auditorium. The coordinator was Peggy Smith. (The Storytelling Tent area, coordinated by Nancy Case, and featuring some of the same storytellers, was not recorded.) Larkin, of Atlanta, spoke twice; the first time to fill in for the two absent storytellers: John Johnson and Margie Baldwin. Cappa, (of Williamsport, PA), Roy (of Fort Myers), and Rivers (of Ybor City) were audience members participating in the Cousin Thelma Story Swap. Harshbarger, of Tallahassee, used finger puppets in her presentation. Smith and Seaman were from Jacksonville. Louis resided in Miami.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C94-34
Item ID
C94-35
Item ID
C94-36
Item ID
C94-37
Item ID
C94-38
Item ID
C94-39
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/memory/collections/folklife

Storytellers at the 1997 Florida Folk Festival (Storytelling Tent) (Sunday)

239844
Date
1997-05-25
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
15 audio cassette recordings. Storytellers spoke between 10:00am and 5pm at the Storytelling Tent. (The Storytelling Auditorium area, which featured some of the same storytellers, was not recorded.) Newsom, Moye, and Henricks served as the emcees. Several of the storytellers also sang songs.
Type
Sound
Item ID
C97-126
Item ID
C97-127
Item ID
C97-128
Item ID
C97-129
Item ID
C97-130
Item ID
C97-131
Item ID
C97-132
Item ID
C97-133
Item ID
C97-134
Item ID
C97-135
Item ID
C97-136
Item ID
C97-137
Item ID
C97-138
Item ID
C97-139
Item ID
C97-140
Great Depression

Recording of the In the Nick of Time Conference on Florida Folklife and the WPA

239145
Date
1989-02-04
Collection
Florida Folklife Collection
Description
"Eleven audio cassettes. Recording of a conference regarding the value of the WPA (and the Florida Writer's Project) to Florida Folklife. The fieldwork conducted by the WPA from 1935 through 1943 can be found at the Library of Congress, as well as duplicates in S 1576. (Use this database to locate them.) C89-1: Stetson Kennedy discusses the WPA in Florida; "apartheid" [segregation] in Florida; Florida at the time of the Depression; his introduction to folklore; various stories on various places in Florida; race and gender in the WPA in Florida. (Dale Olson features as emcee throughout series) C89-2: Stetson Kennedy continues his talk with a discussion of methodology, Zora Neale Hurston, and how the NEH and NEA have a different formula than the WPA. Alan Jabbour plays music and discusses his background as a native Floridian from Miami. Sources for Florida folk materials are discussed and music is played ("The Sloop John B" is specifically named). C89-3: Alan Jabbour continues discussing songs of various ethnic origins, such as Slovakian, Minorcan, and Greek. Ann Banks discusses her background as a Florida native and tells stories. She also discusses re-issued stories from the FWP, such as Benjamin Botkin and his emphasis on literary realism; WPA writers as pioneers. C89-4: Anne Banks continues with stories. Alan Lomax discusses the background of what had been said previously; the "century of the common man"; various people involved with the WPA including FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt; archives and records; Woody Guthrie and his song, "Going Where the Climate Suits My Clothes"; WPA writers and John Lomax's involvement in beginning of the Slave Narrative Collection; difficulties and risks in gathering folklore; importance of folklore to the public sector. C89-5: Alan Lomax continues discussing fieldwork with African Americans; Zora Neale Hurston (he also performs one of the songs she collected); Stetson Kennedy and his work with the program; the dangers of fieldwork; importance of oldest documents; living in the black community; African instruments; songs he collected (particularly blues). C89-6: Gary Mormino speaks on aspects of the WPA relating to African Americans. He specifically discusses Stetson Kennedy; the Ex-Slave Club of Miami; WPA bill of 1935; Florida's part in the project; African American writing unit; Sterling Brown; slave narratives collected between 1936 and 1938 and Florida's slave narratives; non-published interviews; poor whites; faith in the African American church; social fabric of plantation-community life; learning to read; retaining African customs; African American community life in interviews; differences between Georgia and Alabama as seen in narratives and American history. C89-7: Ron Foreman continues with the discussion on African Americans and the WPA, focusing on the role of the African American writers unit in Florida; emerging Florida materials; Clara White Mission; the three field workers studying African Americans in Florida in 1937; Zora Neale Hurston's importance to the project. Barbara Speisman continues the discussion with references to her own background and stories about Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. C89-8: Barbara Speisman continues with a comparison of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. David Kaufelt discusses the WPA Guide as a resource for writers and its different contents. He focuses on the Florida historical novel; the tour section; African Americans in the Guide; "The Golden Wedding"; winter season; sports and recreation; the Guide as providing a skeleton of Florida history; failings of the Guide including economic and racist fears; anti-Semitism and the lack of reference to Jews in the Guide; the mechanics of putting together the Guide; the Guide as a "very good resource for Florida." C89-9: Peggy Bulger discusses the establishment of the FWP; the search for useable past and bicentennial celebration; American Folklife Preservation Act; establishment of the Florida Folklife Programs and the FWP. Ann Banks discusses ethnic hatred and strength; history of and comparison between the Florida Folklife Program and the FWP; field materials of the Florida Folklife Program; state pride through folklife material; works of the Florida Folklife Program; new ideas of the FWP; New Deal's policy; similarities of work today; cultural conservation and folklife work; products that meet needs of folk culture and government sponsored agency; FWP materials; comparison of FWP and Florida Folklife Program benefits; problems of the New Deal folklorists and those of today. C89-10: Ormond Loomis reads excerpts from the collection entitled "Cracker"; responds to the condition of materials; collection of the WPA at the Florida Folklife Program. A question and answer session brings comments on various subjects from Alan Lomax, Ann Banks, Peggy Bulger, Cheryl Cannon, and Ormond Loomis. Topics include exploitation by the middle class and the spirit of natural folklore; feeding back into the communities; trends; the NEA; the State of Florida and folklore; the good of White Springs. C89-11: Question and answer session continues with comments from Stetson Kennedy, Alan Lomax, Peggy Bulger, Catherine Sugrue, Dale Olson, Alan Jabbour and Ron Foreman. Topics include materials in curriculum; money as a concern for folklorists; the Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs; preservation; schools."
Type
Sound
Item ID
C89-1
Item ID
C89-2
Item ID
C89-3
Item ID
C89-4
Item ID
C89-5
Item ID
C89-6
Item ID
C89-7
Item ID
C89-8
Item ID
C89-9
Item ID
C89-10
Item ID
C89-11
Great Depression

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