Welcome to the Wakulla Springs State park Cherokee sink unit

Welcome to the Wakulla Springs State park Cherokee sink unit

Transcript

RULES

No alcoholic beverages

Pets must be on a leash

No ground fires

No climbing trees or attaching ropes, cables, etc.

No glass containers in or adjacent to sinkhole

No overnight camping or parking

15 miles per hour speed limit on entrance road

Motorized vehicles allowed only on designated roads

Park in designated area

Hikin and non-motorized  bikes allowed on service roads

Open 8 a.m. to sunset 365 days a year

FACILITIES

Handicap accessible Porto-Let restroom.

Picnic tables

Barbeque grills

Trash cans

Hiking Trails


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WELCOME

to the

Wakulla Springs

State Park

CHEROKEE SINK

UNIT

This property is part of the Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park. Total acreage of the park is 6,000 acres with approximately 1,900 acres in the Cherokee Sink unit.

Cherokee Sink has a long history of local use as a swimming area. The Sink is quite large and has steep limestone walls on several sides. Its water depth is approximately 70 feet.

Recreational activities include swimming, picknicking, hiking, and SCUBA diving. All divers using SCUBA gear must register at the Ranger Station prior to entering Cherokee Sink.

(This brochure was revised January 24, 2005)


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Directions to Cherokee Sink

A: At exit of Wakulla Springs State Park, turn left onto State Road 267 and drive 0.1 miles.

B: At caution light at intersection of State Road 267 and County 61, turn left (south) onto County Road 61, then drive 1.2 miles south.

C: Turn right on unpaved park road on right and drive south 1.2 miles.

D: Turn right into parking lot of Cherokee Sink

[Map Depiction]

Legend

Arrows -> Route to Cherokee Sink

________ Paved Road

----- Unpaved road

Circle = Road Number


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INFORMATION

Cherokee Sink is a natural geologic formation called a sinkhole lake. it was formed by the slow erosion of limestone rock over thousands of years. As rainfall seeps through soil, it absorbs carbond dioxide and reacts with decaying vegetation, creating slightly acid groundwater. As this groundwater flows through cracks in the limestone, it dissolves the rock and creates cavities. Cherokee Sink was formed when the land above a rock cavity collapsed.

The Casseaux Cemetery on the south side of the sink is a 1800's family cemetery. It was established in 1850. By the late 1970's, it was completely destroyed by vandals. Grave markers were throen in the sink, and the surrounding brick wall was dismantled and stolen.

Descendants of the Causseaux family and the Florida Park Service are actively pursuing funding and seeking information to restore the site.

For additional information, please call Wakulla Springs State Park at 850/224-5950.


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RULES

No alcoholic beverages

Pets must be on a leash

No ground fires

No climbing trees or attaching ropes, cables, etc.

No glass containers in or adjacent to sinkhole

No overnight camping or parking

15 miles per hour speed limit on entrance road

Motorized vehicles allowed only on designated roads

Park in designated area

Hikin and non-motorized  bikes allowed on service roads

Open 8 a.m. to sunset 365 days a year

FACILITIES

Handicap accessible Porto-Let restroom.

Picnic tables

Barbeque grills

Trash cans

Hiking Trails

Source

State Library Of Florida: Ephemera Collection, Wakulla

Description

Brochure providing information of the the Wakulla Springs State Park's Cherokee Sink Unit and directions to the sink