4 items found
Keywords: "Secession" (All words), Collection ID is exactly "6"
Sorted by Title
CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 3

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 3

Date
Description
Letter, February 15, 1861, E. R. Lea, Philadelphia, to ''My dear Friend [Ellen Call Long?], 8 pp.: ''I am glad you have such good accounts from Richard in whose welfare I feel much interested, as well as in dear little Nonie too. . . I grieve sincerely for you, and those who think like you, that the Gulf states have not acted wisely in thus rushing into Secession. . . I hope something may yet occur to prevent civil war. . . you will scarcely be surprised to hear that northern men cannot easily sit down and fold their hands, while the best and most prosperous government the world has ever seen is being torn to pieces. . . The mass of the people [have] no desire to exact improper concessions from the South. . . If by Black Republicans you mean Abolitionists, do understand that they as a party are small and without any influence. The Republican Party, ''par excellence,'' is composed of Old Whigs, moderate Democrats, and Americans and . . . have no intention, as they have no power, to interfere with slavery where it now exists. . . I think there is no feeling of animosity here towards any of the seceded states but South Carolina. . . Kiss Nonie for me, and give my respects to your Father, whose pamphlet I read with great interest. . .''
Collection
CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 8

CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 8

Date
Description
Letter, March 19, 1862, Richard K. Call, Lake Jackson, to Thomas J. Perkins, 2 pp., responding to a conversation ''in which my loyalty to the south was called in question. . . In the hope of inducing my accuser or accusers to meet me face to face, with his false and malicious accusations [I] request you will do me the . . . favour to shew this letter, to each of [them] . . . although I opposed secession, with all I desired the command of the Troops engaged in the defence of Florida. And though I have not obtained that command . . . My very willingness to take command and risk life and fortune . . . must give the lie to all who accuse me of disloyalty to the South . . .'' [Multiple tears and holes: text lost]
Collection
CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 3 Folder: 24 Item: 1

CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 3 Folder: 24 Item: 1

Date
Description
Jane Brevard Darby scrapbook: News clipping, 1861, 1 p., entitled ''The Secession of Florida,'' regarding passage of the Ordinance of Secession.
Collection
CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 5 Folder: 6 Item: 5

CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 5 Folder: 6 Item: 5

Date
Description
Letter, February 12, 1861, Richard K. Call, Lake Jackson, to John S. Littell, Germantown, Pennsylvania, 31 pp., lamenting the destruction of the Union, placing the blame on ''the angry controversy arising on the institution of African slavery,'' and providing a lengthy apology for slavery and secession: ''The institution of slavery, then, demands the earnest attention and the unprejudiced consideration of every American citizen . . . [n]ot as an abstract question of right or wrong, not as a blessing or a curse, but as an existing reality, for good or evil, thrown upon us by inheritance . . . for which no man of the present day is in any manner the least responsible. It should be considered as it is, an institution interwoven and inseparably connected with our social and political system . . . and a national institution, created by the American people and protected by the Constitution of the United States. . . Portugal, in 1503, sent from her possessions on the coast of Africa the first African slaves to America . . . Here was an animal, in the form of man, possessing the greatest physical power, and the greatest capacity for labor and endurance, without one principle of his nature, one faculty of mind or feeling of heart, without spirit or pride of character, to enable him to regard slavery as a degradation. A wild barbarian, to be tamed and civilized by the discipline of slavery. . . This race, so distinctly marked by nature with inferiority, physical, moral, and mental, as forever to forbid amalgamation, and keep it distinct from our own, has become a great class of laboring, civilized people, domesticated with the white race, and dependent on the discipline of that race for the preservation of the civilization it has acquired. . . The North and South can never live in peace together except on terms of perfect social and political equality, therefore a separation, with war, and all its attendant calamities, will be far better than a discontented unity, with the confinement of slavery to its present limits. . . rather than bear this insult, and endure this calamity, I prefer that the last Southern man should fall, on the last battle-field of the terrible war, in which we may soon be engaged. . .'' Includes Littell's reply to Call dated March 4, 1861, informing Call that the letter was at the printer's.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 3CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 3/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/callbrevard.jpg
CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 8CALL FAMILY PAPERS - Box: 1 Folder: 7 Item: 8/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/callbrevard.jpg
CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 3 Folder: 24 Item: 1CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 3 Folder: 24 Item: 1/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/callbrevard.jpg
CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 5 Folder: 6 Item: 5CALL FAMILY PAPERS (continued) - Box: 5 Folder: 6 Item: 5/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/callbrevard.jpg