117 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Geographic Term is exactly "Tarpon Springs (Fla.)"
Fannie and George Kouliamos making Greek bread

Fannie and George Kouliamos making Greek bread

Date
1988-08
Description
Four color slides. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Greek Dancers of Tarpon Springs at the 1980 Florida Folk Festival

Greek Dancers of Tarpon Springs at the 1980 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1980-05
Description
One black and white print.
Collection
Greek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Greek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Date
1989-06-24
Description
Nineteen color slides. Greek embroidery displayed. Brief biographies of the embroiderers (some pictured) can be found in the folder. The festival was held June 24-25, 1989 to celebrate Tarpon Springs heritage of sponge diving, a practice that dated back to the 1890s. By 1905, when 500 Greek immigrants answered an ad to be sponge divers, the town acquired a distinctive Greek flavor, as the Greek Americans thrived in the sponge industry. At one point, Florida provided 95% of the nation's sponges. Although today over fishing and synthetic materials have undercut the sponge diving industry, the tradition lives on in Greek families, and through tourism.
Collection
Greek life in Tarpon Springs

Greek life in Tarpon Springs

Date
1988-06-17
Description
Sixteen color slides.
Collection
Greek sponge divers

Greek sponge divers

Date
1988-06-16
Description
Twelve color slides. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Images from the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Images from the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Date
1989-06-24
Description
61 color slides. Images of musicans (many are dark), sponge diving helmet makers Toth and Lerios, crafts, and various speakers. The festival was held June 24-25, 1989 to celebrate Tarpon Springs heritage of sponge diving, a practice that dated back to the 1890s. By 1905, when 500 Greek immigrants answered an ad to be sponge divers, the town acquired a distinctive Greek flavor, as the Greek Americans thrived in the sponge industry. At one point, Florida provided 95% of the nation's sponges. Although today over fishing and synthetic materials have undercut the sponge diving industry, the tradition lives on in Greek families, and through tourism.
Collection
Images of the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Images of the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Date
1989-06-24
Description
One proof sheet with 36 black and white images (plus negatives). Images of sponge diving, sponge processing Greek cooking, Greek craft booths, and Tsimouris making a Tsabouna, a Greek bagpipe. The festival was held June 24-25, 1989 to celebrate Tarpon Springs heritage of sponge diving, a practice that dated back to the 1890s. By 1905, when 500 Greek immigrants answered an ad to be sponge divers, the town acquired a distinctive Greek flavor, as the Greek Americans thrived in the sponge industry. At one point, Florida provided 95% of the nation's sponges. Although today over fishing and synthetic materials have undercut the sponge diving industry, the tradition lives on in Greek families, and through tourism.
Collection
Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas Kavouklis

Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas Kavouklis

Date
1995-01
Description
35 color slides. Kavoukis was funded to learn from Tsimouris six tunes on the tsabauna, as well as how to make the instrument. The tsabouna was a traditional Greek bagpipe made out of a goat's skin. For more information, see S 1644, box 12, folder 4. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller, and then Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas Kavouklis

Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas Kavouklis

Date
1995-06-09
Description
Two proof sheets with 72 black and white images (plus negatives). Kavoukis was funded to learn from Tsimouris six tunes on the tsabauna, as well as how to make the instrument. The tsabouna was a traditional Greek bagpipe made out of a goat's skin. For more information, see S 1644, box 12, folder 4. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller, and then Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas Kavouklis

Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas Kavouklis

Date
1995-06-09
Description
30 color slides. Kavoukis was funded to learn from Tsimouris six tunes on the tsabauna, as well as how to make the instrument. The tsabouna was a traditional Greek bagpipe made out of a goat's skin. For more information, see S 1644, box 12, folder 4. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller, and then Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Fannie and George Kouliamos making Greek breadFannie and George Kouliamos making Greek breadStill ImageFieldwork
Cookery, Greek
Greek Americans
Cooking and dining
Kitchens
Bread
Cooks
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Greek Dancers of Tarpon Springs at the 1980 Florida Folk FestivalGreek Dancers of Tarpon Springs at the 1980 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageFolk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Greek Americans
Arts, Greek
Dance
Folk dance
Children
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Greek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalGreek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalStill ImageEmbroiderers
Needleworkers
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Folk festivals
Special events
Demonstrations
Embroidery
Needlework
Design
Material culture
Decorative arts
Craft
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Greek life in Tarpon SpringsGreek life in Tarpon SpringsStill ImageFieldwork
Boats
Docks
Greek Americans
Bakery
Bread
Community culture
Community enterprise
Streets
Maritime life
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Greek sponge diversGreek sponge diversStill ImageSponge divers
Fieldwork
Boats
Greek Americans
Occupational groups
Docks
Sponge fisheries
Sponges
Fisheries
Transportation
Waterways
Fishers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Images from the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalImages from the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalStill ImageMusicians
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Folk festivals
Special events
Demonstrations
Musical instruments
Hides and skins
Bouzouki
Helmets
Craft
Sponge divers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Images of the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalImages of the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalStill ImageArts, Greek
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Musical instrument maker
Sponge divers
Occupational groups
Sponge fisheries
Sponges
Folk festivals
Special events
Food preparation
Cooks
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas KavouklisImages of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas KavouklisStill ImageMusical instrument maker
Fieldwork
Apprentices
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Bagpipes
Musical instruments
Instrument manufacture
Bagpipers
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas KavouklisImages of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas KavouklisStill ImageMusical instrument maker
Fieldwork
Apprentices
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Bagpipes
Musical instruments
Music performance
Performing arts
Bagpipers
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Images of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas KavouklisImages of tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris with his apprentice Nikitas KavouklisStill ImageMusical instrument maker
Fieldwork
Apprentices
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Bagpipes
Musical instruments
Music performance
Performing arts
Bagpipers
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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