8 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Geographic Term is exactly "Lake Park (Fla.)"
Sorted by Title
Atsuko Lefcounte teaching her apprentices about ikebana

Atsuko Lefcounte teaching her apprentices about ikebana

Date
1988-03-14
Description
One audio cassette. Master folk artist Lefcourte took on two apprentices in 1988, Levanthal and McGlamory. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan, where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Date
1988-03
Description
Four proof sheets with 98 black and white images (plus negatives). Master folk artist Lefcourte took on two apprentices in 1988: Levanthal and McGlamory. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan, where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Date
1988-03
Description
Forty-six color slides. Master folk artist Lefcourte took on two apprentices in 1988: Levanthal and McGlamory. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan, where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Former principal and local historian Spencer Pompey discussing Black History month

Former principal and local historian Spencer Pompey discussing Black History month

Date
1988-02-11
Description
Eleven color slides. Pompey, a native FLoridian from Live Oak, was a local historian and retired school principal. He was also invovled in local politics. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Spencer Pompey presentation for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Spencer Pompey presentation for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Date
1988-02-11
Description
Two audio cassettes. Pompey, a former principal and local historian from Live Oak, discusses Black History month.
Collection
Verbal traditions by students at Lake Park Elementary School for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Verbal traditions by students at Lake Park Elementary School for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Date
1988-02-05
Description
One audio cassette. Students of Mrs. Williams class.
Collection
Verbal traditions by students at Lake Park Elementary School for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Verbal traditions by students at Lake Park Elementary School for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Date
1988-02-05
Description
One audio cassette. Students of Mrs. Hogkins class.
Collection
William (Washboard Bill) Cooke talking to students in Lake Park

William (Washboard Bill) Cooke talking to students in Lake Park

Date
1988-02-04
Description
Four color slides. Cooke, born July 4 1905 near St. Augustine, spent much of his life performing: in jook joints, on the street, on trains, and later in some of the top clubs of South Florida. In these images, he talks with elementary students about his career and music. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1640_20_tape20Atsuko Lefcounte teaching her apprentices about ikebanaSoundArtisans
Flower arrangers
Apprentices
Arts, Japanese
Flower arrangement, Japanese
Flowers
Japanese Americans
Asian American arts
Asians
Oral communication
Oral performance
Lecturers
Sound recordings
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaAtsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaStill ImageArtisans
Flower arrangers
Apprentices
Flowers
Arts, Asian
Asian American arts
Asian Americans
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Material culture
Plants
Decorative arts
Decoration and ornament
Teaching of folklore
Flower arrangement, Japanese
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaAtsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaStill ImageArtisans
Flower arrangers
Apprentices
Flowers
Arts, Asian
Asian American arts
Asian Americans
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Material culture
Plants
Decorative arts
Decoration and ornament
Teaching of folklore
Flower arrangement, Japanese
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Former principal and local historian Spencer Pompey discussing Black History monthFormer principal and local historian Spencer Pompey discussing Black History monthStill ImageHistorian
Fieldwork
Classrooms
Education
Teaching of folklore
Elementary schools
Schools
Students
Children
Florida history
Local history
Historians
African Americans
School principals
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1685_06_tape33Spencer Pompey presentation for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education ProjectSoundLocal history
Field recordings
Education
Elementary schools
Students
Children
Florida history
African Americans
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1685_06_tape02Verbal traditions by students at Lake Park Elementary School for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education ProjectSoundSchool children
Field recordings
Tales
Speech play
Oral narratives
Elementary schools
Storytelling
Students
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1685_06_tape03Verbal traditions by students at Lake Park Elementary School for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education ProjectSoundSchool children
Field recordings
Tales
Speech play
Oral narratives
Oral narratives
Elementary schools
Storytelling
Students
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
William (Washboard Bill) Cooke talking to students in Lake ParkWilliam (Washboard Bill) Cooke talking to students in Lake ParkStill ImageEntertainers
Singers
Musicians
Fieldwork
Classrooms
Education
Teaching of folklore
Elementary schools
Schools
Students
Children
Street vendors
Local history
Demonstrations
African Americans
Performing arts
Music performance
Singing
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg