39 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "New Deal, 1933-1939"
Sorted by Title
Interview with Fred Williams

Interview with Fred Williams

Date
1983-04-16
Description
Two audio cassettes. C83-104: Williams, born in Sneads, Florida, in 1923, discusses being raised in a rural farming family in Jackson County, Florida; joining the Army and using his disabled veterans' pension to start his own farm; the character of his family; life during the "Hoover Days" of the Depression; the Wesleyan Church creating a sense of civic community; farming under President Roosevelt's government policies; serving in the military and being injured in Europe during World War Two; being disabled; family sayings; and sacred harp singing in northern Alabama. In addition, he also talks about hog killing, smoking meat, mule plowing and other routines on the farm. C83-105: Williams talks about making homemade brooms; giving homemade brooms and bonnets to the elderly; the proliferation of modern technology; physical and mental challenges involved in farming; attending church revivals and going fishing in the summertime; training mules; and serenadings, weddings, and cane grindings. In addition, he remarks upon black quartet singing, his marriage, his political career and political outlook, and his religious views, including his outlook on the bible, Israel, and his favorable regard for Jews.
Collection
Interview with Stetson Kennedy

Interview with Stetson Kennedy

Date
1981-09-22
Description
Three reel to reel recordings. In the interview, Kennedy discusses Stanley Papio; the WPA and the Federal Writers Project; working with anthropologist/writer Zora Neale Hurston; Carita Doggett Corse; collecting folklife during the 1930s; painter Mario Sanchez; his many books; infiltrating the KKK; work with labor unions; and the reprinting of the Folk Songs of Florida by Alton Morris, and Kennedy's Palmetto Country. Stetson Kennedy was one of the earliest folklorists working in Florida. Born in 1916, the Jacksonville native began collecting Northeast Florida folk sayings as a teenager. After a stint at the University of Florida, Kennedy joined the Florida WPA Writers Project in 1937 to administer the folklore, oral history, and ethnic studies section. Among the workers he supervised was novelist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. Soon thereafter he published Palmetto Country, an exploration of Florida folklife edited by Erskine Caldwell. His papers from the WPA are housed within the Florida Folklife Collection. Although he remained a lifelong folklife supporter, in the 1940s and 1950s, Kennedy also worked to end Jim Crow laws and helped exposed the Ku Klux Klan with several publications. The recipient of many awards, including the Florida Folk Heritage Award and the NAACP Freedom Award, he was also the subject of Library of Congress' folklorist Peggy Bulger's dissertation. Among his books are Southern Exposure, The Klan Unmasked, and South Florida Folklife, co-authored with Bulger and Tina Bucuvalas. Bulger wrote her dissertation on Kennedy. Copied onto C81-71, C81-72 & C81-73.
Collection
Saturday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Narrative Stage) (Tape 10)

Saturday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Narrative Stage) (Tape 10)

Date
1996-05-25
Description
One audio cassette tape. Stetson Kennedy (introduced by Tina Bucuvalas) discusses the WPA and projects they conducted in Florida recording early songs and stories of the state. He notes that minorities were included in the project and speaks of the contributions of Zora Neale Hurston in collecting early history. He also discusses the 1936 Keys Hurricane and working with Allen Lomax.
Collection
Saturday program at the 1997 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Narrative Stage) (Tape 4)

Saturday program at the 1997 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Narrative Stage) (Tape 4)

Date
1997-05-24
Description
One audio cassette recordings. Sax Kari (a.k.a. "Candied Yams") is interviewed by Brent Tozzer. He discusses his childhood in New Orleans and the blues and jazz influences on his life (such as Benny Goodman and Charlie Christian). He speaks about learning music (specifically piano from Fats Waller) and early groups in which he played. He also discusses the various terms used for African-Americans and their changes over time as well as growing up during the Depression and his first job with the WPA.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Cherry Lake  (1936-1937 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings at Cherry Lake (1936-1937 recording expedition)

Date
1936
Description
One reel to reel. (Copied onto audio cassette C90-52/53, in S 1576.) These recordings were created during the 1936-1937 expedition led by John Lomax. In these recordings Lomax’s colleague visited Cherry Lake.(NOTE -- Valiant's papers can be found at the Mississippi State University's Special Collections.) These were the second of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. At the time Lomax was in charge of the folklife section of the Federal Writers Project. He left that position in 1938, and in 1939 returned to Florida. See the online exhibit about that 1939 expedition at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/lohtml/lohome.html For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress, and many are available online.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Gainesville, Raiford, Panama City, and Jacksonville

WPA field recordings at Gainesville, Raiford, Panama City, and Jacksonville

Date
1939-10-04
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created the Lomaxes and Morris of the University of Florida, assisted by workers of the Florida Writers Project (including photographer Robert Cook), in 1939 and 1949. Morris created 14 12-inch acetate records in total. On his 1939 trip, he recorded Greek singers in Jacksonville; in 1949, he recorded Sacred Harp singers in Gainesville, and local singers in Jacksonville and Panama City. The Lomax recordings are from a 1939 trip to the State Prison Farm in Raiford ("Job Job" was recorded in Livingston, Alabama). For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Jacksonville, Tarpon Springs, St. Augustine, and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

WPA field recordings at Jacksonville, Tarpon Springs, St. Augustine, and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

Date
1939-08-26
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Morris of the University of Florida, assisted by workers of the Florida Writers Project (including photographer Robert Cook), in 1939 and 1940. He created 14 12-inch acetate records in total. On this recording, Morris recorded Greek singers in Tarpon Springs and Jacksonville, Minorcans in St. Augustine, and unidentified singers from the Czechoslovakian community of Slavia, founded in 1911. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Tarpon Springs and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

WPA field recordings at Tarpon Springs and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

Date
1939-08-25
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Morris of the University of Florida, assisted by workers of the Florida Writers Project (including photographer Robert Cook), in 1939 and 1940. He created 14 12-inch acetate records in total. On this recording, Morris visited Tarpon Springs, and the Czechoslovakian community of Slavia, founded in 1911. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at the Florida State Prison in Union County  (1936-1937 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings at the Florida State Prison in Union County (1936-1937 recording expedition)

Date
1936
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created during the 1936-1937 expedition led by John Lomax. In these recordings he visited the Florida State Prison at Raiford in Union County These were the second of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. At the time Lomax was in charge of the folklife section of the Federal Writers Project. He left that position in 1938, and in 1939 returned to Florida (including to Raiford and Alachua County). See the online exhibit about that 1939 expedition at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/lohtml/lohome.html For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at the Florida State Prison in Union County , and in Palm Beach County (1936-1937 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings at the Florida State Prison in Union County , and in Palm Beach County (1936-1937 recording expedition)

Date
1936
Description
One reel to reel. (Copied onto audio cassette C90-43/44 in S 1576.) These recordings were created during the 1936-1937 expedition led by John Lomax. In these recordings he visited the Florida State Prison at Raiford in Union County. These were the second of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. At the time Lomax was in charge of the folklife section of the Federal Writers Project. He left that position in 1938, and in 1939 returned to Florida (including to Raiford and Alachua County). See the online exhibit about that 1939 expedition at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/lohtml/lohome.html For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida's FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Conrwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art's Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida's WPA program by the Library of Congress' Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1576_10_c83-104Interview with Fred WilliamsSoundFieldwork
Interviews
Local history
Oral histories
Life histories
Personal experience narratives
Turpentine industry and trade
Turpentining
Agriculture
Farm life
Family farming
Great Depression
New Deal, 1933-1939
Musical tradition, sacred
Shape note singing
World War, 1939-1945
Broom making
Farmer
Broom makers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t81-100Interview with Stetson KennedySoundFieldwork
Interviews
Folklore
New Deal, 1933-1939
United States. Work Projects Administration
Painters
Artists
Publishers and publishing
Oral histories
Life histories
Personal experience narratives
Collecting
Labor unions
Ku Klux Klan (1915- )
Authors
Folklorists
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_64_c96-070Saturday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Narrative Stage) (Tape 10)SoundFolk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Oral performance
Oral narratives
Personal experience narratives
Fieldwork
Folklife
Oral histories
Hurricanes
Florida history
New Deal, 1933-1939
United States. Work Projects Administration
Folklore
Authors
Folklorists
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1576_68_c97-074Saturday program at the 1997 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Narrative Stage) (Tape 4)SoundFolk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Festivals
Special events
Oral performance
Life histories
Interviewing
African Americans
Jazz songs
Jazz music
Blues (Music)
United States. Work Projects Administration
African Americans Segregation
Great Depression
New Deal, 1933-1939
Jazz musicians
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-223bWPA field recordings at Cherry Lake (1936-1937 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Gospel music
Old time music
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Elderly, the
Gospel songs
Piano music
Fiddle music
Musicians
Pianists
Fiddlers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-226WPA field recordings at Gainesville, Raiford, Panama City, and JacksonvilleSoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Religious music
Religious songs
Musical tradition, sacred
Shape note singing
Church membership
Drinking songs
Love songs
Sea shanties
Play party songs
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-225WPA field recordings at Jacksonville, Tarpon Springs, St. Augustine, and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Arts, Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakian Americans
Songs, Greek
Songs, Slavic
Minorcans
Minorcan Americans
Love songs
Christmas music
Carols
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-224WPA field recordings at Tarpon Springs and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Arts, Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakian Americans
Songs, Greek
Songs, Slavic
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-238WPA field recordings at the Florida State Prison in Union County (1936-1937 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Gospel music
Old time music
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Sermons
Gospel songs
Prayer
African Americans
Arts in prisons
Male prisoners
Women prisoners
Jails
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-239WPA field recordings at the Florida State Prison in Union County , and in Palm Beach County (1936-1937 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Gospel music
Old time music
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Sermons
Gospel songs
Blues (Music)
African Americans
Women prisoners
Male prisoners
Jails
Arts in prisons
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
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