3567 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Musicians"
Sorted by Title
Zeke Stephens at the 1975 Florida Folk Festival

Zeke Stephens at the 1975 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1985-08
Description
Two color slides. Stephens was from Panama City and played at several folk festivals.
Collection
Zeke Stephens

Zeke Stephens

Date
Description
Three black and white prints. All three pritns were assigned one catalogue number: 1. Zeke And Thelma boltin, 1969 Florida Folk Festival 2. Photograph by Zeke Stephens of a St. Andrews Bay fishing boat from 1912. 3. Zeke Stephens with his fiddles in 1977
Collection
Xochitl Moreno's quinceanera

Xochitl Moreno's quinceanera

Date
1996-07-06
Description
57 color slides. The Mexican American Music Survey was created to document the musical traditions of Florida's various Mexican-American communities: Apopka, South Dade County, Immokalee, the St. Johns River Basin, and Central Florida. Funded by a grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Community Folklife Program, the survey was conducted between 1994 and 1996 by folklorist Robert Stone. Among the musical traditions were serenatas, conjunto, quinceanara ritual music, ranchera Michoacana, mariachi, norteno, Tejano, and pop music. At the end of the project, a sampler music tape was created by the Florida Folklife Program for distribution to various libraries.
Collection
WTVT TV-13 News (Tampa) story on Florida Folk Festival

WTVT TV-13 News (Tampa) story on Florida Folk Festival

Date
1988-05
Description
One video recording. (1/2" tape; 30 minutes) Bobby Hicks singing "Zachariah Creek" and "I'm Florida, Need I Say More" as a promo for Florida Folk Festival (remainder of tape is regular news broadcast and a soap opera).
Collection
WPA field recordings of a dedication ceremony in Tarpon Springs (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings of a dedication ceremony in Tarpon Springs (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-05-12
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by FWP's folklore section between March and July 1940. A total of twenty-two 12-inch acetate records during that period. On this recording by Flareton, the greek community of Tarpon Springs held a deication to a building erected by the Ladies Society, Piloptohus (Friend of the Poor). Includes speeches, dances, and song. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Riviera  and Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Riviera and Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-01-15
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording, Wilbur Roberts tells stories in Riviera; the Nelsons sing traditional Bahamian songs, and Rolle in Key West plays with his band on several songs. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida's FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art's Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida's WPA program by the Library of Congress' Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-01
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording Rolle plays with his band on several Bahamian folk songs in Key West; White telling stories and songs; and the 85 year old Barnwell, who grew up on a plantation in Nassau County. She tells stories of her 'mammies,' and sings songs from her childhood. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-01-23
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording Rolle plays with his band on several Bahamian folk songs. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida's FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art's Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida's WPA program by the Library of Congress' Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Jacksonville and Ybor City (1939 recording expedition: Herbert Halpert)

WPA field recordings in Jacksonville and Ybor City (1939 recording expedition: Herbert Halpert)

Date
1939-06-18
Description
One reel to reel. (These recordings appear at the start of the reel. The rest of the reel is another WPA expedition.) All of Zora Neale Hurston's Florida recordings can be found on C87-24, including those on this reel. These recordings were created by folklorist Halpert -- originally of New York City, and later a pioneer in the field, in June 1939. This was part of a larger nine-state fieldwork tour of the South between 12 March and 30 June 1939. He created a total of twelve 12-inch acetate records in Florida. On this recording, Halpert was assisted by Stetson Kennedy in Jacksonville. In Ybor City, he recorded Cuban drummer Bermudez. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Eatonville and Belle Glade (1935 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Eatonville and Belle Glade (1935 recording expedition)

Date
1935
Description
One reel to reel. (Copied onto an unnumbered audio cassette, S 1576, box 41.) These recordings were from the 1935 expedition by Lomax, Hurston, and Barnicle in Eatonville and Belle Glade. This was the first of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Conrwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Zeke Stephens at the 1975 Florida Folk FestivalZeke Stephens at the 1975 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageMusicians
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Festivals
Fiddling
Fiddle music
Violin
Performing arts
Musical instruments
Fiddlers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Zeke StephensZeke StephensStill ImageMusical instruments
Violin music
Violin
Musicians
Fiddlers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Xochitl Moreno's quinceaneraXochitl Moreno's quinceaneraStill ImageSingers
Musicians
Fieldwork
Quinceanera (Social custom)
Rites of passage
Special events
Performing arts
Music performance
Singing
Birthday rites
Mexican Americans
Latinos
Bands (Music)
Religious rites
Priests
Teenagers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
WTVT TV-13 News (Tampa) story on Florida Folk FestivalWTVT TV-13 News (Tampa) story on Florida Folk FestivalMoving ImageSingers
Musicians
Festivals
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Music performance
Singing
Guitar music
Folk singers
Television
Television broadcasting of news
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_video.jpg
a_s1576_t86-252WPA field recordings of a dedication ceremony in Tarpon Springs (March-July 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Choir singing
Performing arts
Dedications
Music performance
Singing
Dance music
Religious music
Religious rites
Ballads
Speeches, addresses, etc.
Songs, Greek
Musicians
Dancers
Priests
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-246WPA field recordings in Riviera and Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Bahamian American
Ballads
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
African Americans
Tales
Narratives
Accordion music
Storytelling
Guitar music
Musicians
Storytellers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-248WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Bahamian American
Sea songs
Bands (Music)
Performing arts
Horn music
Music performance
Singing
African Americans
Accordion music
Elderly, the
Tales
Narratives
Supernatural legends
Personal experience narratives
Musicians
Storytellers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-247WPA field recordings in Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Bahamian American
Sea songs
Bands (Music)
Performing arts
Horn music
Music performance
Singing
African Americans
Accordion music
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-245aWPA field recordings in Jacksonville and Ybor City (1939 recording expedition: Herbert Halpert)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
African Americans
Folklorists
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Preachers
Gospel (Black)
Gospel music
Drum music
Dance music
Work songs
Arts, Cuban
Drum performance
Musicians
Drummers (Musicians)
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-235WPA field recordings in Eatonville and Belle Glade (1935 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
African Americans
Blues (Music)
Blues singers
Performing arts
Guitar music
Music performance
Singing
Harmonica music
Old time music
Musicians
Guitarist
Harmonica players
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg