81 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Music Latin America"
Interviews with members of the Salsa Express

Interviews with members of the Salsa Express

Date
1986-08-14
Description
Three reel to reels. T81-73: Morrison and Menendez, members of the band Salsa Express, discuss the ethnic makeup of their band (a mixture of Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Anglo American); the types of Salsa music they play; the structure of Salsa music; jazz influences in Salsa music; instruments they use in the band; improvisation in the music style; conga dancing and Mardi Gras festivals; and Santeria culture and music. T81-74: Morrison and Menendez continue their discussion on music. They talk about the different types of music they play; the rhythms and instruments they use; dance music played at Quince parties; an extraordinary Quince party Menendez once attended; comparsa, or street, dancing; disco music; cloved-dancing; the Latin traditions they have maintained and to what degree they have evolved; and playing conservative styles of music. T81-75: Morrison and Menendez discuss a Cuban band in Washington D.C. called the Kubata that plays rhumba music and talk about the difference between rhumba and salsa music. Menendez also discusses his life in Castro's Cuba as a youth and his immigration to the U.S. in October 1970; New Years Eve and Fiesta de Quince traditions; dominoes; gambling; and the changes that have occurred in Cuba since Communism. Copied onto C81-44, C81-45 & C81-46.
Collection
Los Fronterizos de Matamoros and Grupo Sensacion recording session.

Los Fronterizos de Matamoros and Grupo Sensacion recording session.

Date
1995-04-09
Description
One DAT tape. The recording session took place at the home of Emilo Hernandez (a Chicano band leader), and was set up by Tomas Granado. The first band, Los Fronterizos (The Bordermen), played conjunto music and were comprised of Felix Cortez (bajo sexto), Felix Cortez, Jr. (accordion), Eduardo Cortinas (drums), Eleazar Cortez (drums), and Jesus Cortez Jr. (bass). They were a popular local band. Jesus, Sr., the band leader and accoridonist, worked as a bartender. The other band was Grupo Sensacion, a five-member Tejano/pop band led by Jose Luis Velasquez (singer/keyboard player). His daughter, Julissa Lissette also sang for the band. The Mexican American Music Survey was created to document the musical traditions of Florida's various Mexican-American communities: Apopka, South Dade County, Immokalee, the St. Johns River Basin, and Central Florida. Funded by a grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Community Folklife Program, the survey was conducted between 1994 and 1996 by folklorist Robert Stone. Among the musical traditions were serenatas, conjunto, quinceanara ritual music, ranchera Michoacana, mariachi, norteno, Tejano, and pop music. At the end of the project, a sampler music tape was created by the Florida Folklife Program for distribution to various libraries.
Collection
Mother's Day Serenades

Mother's Day Serenades

Date
1995-05-14
Description
One DAT tape. Recordings of various serenatas (Mother's Day serenades) in the Mexican American community in Homestead. Dating back to Mexico, serenatas were usually performed below the window of a mother. Tomas Granado re-established the practice in the Homestead area. At the time, Granado performed as many as 40 each Mother's Day. The Mexican American Music Survey was created to document the musical traditions of Florida's various Mexican-American communities: Apopka, South Dade County, Immokalee, the St. Johns River Basin, and Central Florida. Funded by a grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Community Folklife Program, the survey was conducted between 1994 and 1996 by folklorist Robert Stone. Among the musical traditions were serenatas, conjunto, quinceanara ritual music, ranchera Michoacana, mariachi, norteno, Tejano, and pop music. At the end of the project, a sampler music tape was created by the Florida Folklife Program for distribution to various libraries.
Collection
Mother's Day Serenatas radio broadcast

Mother's Day Serenatas radio broadcast

Date
1995-05-14
Description
Two audio cassettes. (Copied from a DAT tape -- FX95-5-3 -- which is not found in the collection.) This is a field recording of a radio broadcast (Radio Continental 1430AM) that began at 6am. it consisted of Mother's Day serenades, an long-term Mexican tradition that usually invovled musicians performing below a mother's window. Tomas Granado re-established the practice in the Homestead area. The station was owned by Amando and Alfredo Gallegos. La Fuerza del Norte consisted of Granado, David Avalos, Guadalupe Rivera, and Berto Espinoza. Los Errentes de Chua Nuevo Leon consisted of Alberto Espinoza, Juan Rivera, Leonal Pedraza, and Alberto Espinoza. The Mexican American Music Survey was created to document the musical traditions of Florida's various Mexican-American communities: Apopka, South Dade County, Immokalee, the St. Johns River Basin, and Central Florida. Funded by a grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Community Folklife Program, the survey was conducted between 1994 and 1996 by folklorist Robert Stone. Among the musical traditions were serenatas, conjunto, quinceanara ritual music, ranchera Michoacana, mariachi, norteno, Tejano, and pop music. At the end of the project, a sampler music tape was created by the Florida Folklife Program for distribution to various libraries.
Collection
Music at the Cinco de Mayo Festival

Music at the Cinco de Mayo Festival

Date
1996-05-04
Description
Five DAT tapes. (Tapes #16 and #18 are duplicates) Recorded at the Seventh Annual Cinco de Mayo Festival, at the time one of the oldest and largest such celebrations. It doubled as a fund-raiser for local college students. Grupo Energia was led by Carlos Reza, and was made up of ten males. Audience members danced the macarena do their performance. The Mexican American Music Survey was created to document the musical traditions of Florida's various Mexican-American communities: Apopka, South Dade County, Immokalee, the St. Johns River Basin, and Central Florida. Funded by a grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Community Folklife Program, the survey was conducted between 1994 and 1996 by folklorist Robert Stone. Among the musical traditions were serenatas, conjunto, quinceanara ritual music, ranchera Michoacana, mariachi, norteno, Tejano, and pop music. At the end of the project, a sampler music tape was created by the Florida Folklife Program for distribution to various libraries.
Collection
Performances at the 1974 Florida Folk Festival (Main Stage) (Reel 4)

Performances at the 1974 Florida Folk Festival (Main Stage) (Reel 4)

Date
1974-08-30
Description
One reel to reel recording.
Collection
Recording of broadcast on Radio Continental (1430 AM)

Recording of broadcast on Radio Continental (1430 AM)

Date
1992-03
Description
One audio cassette. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by first folklorist Peter Roller, then folklorist Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Recording of Fiesta Guajira on WQBA radio station

Recording of Fiesta Guajira on WQBA radio station

Date
1985-09-01
Description
One audio cassette. (NOTE--the tape may not play. Has some damage.) The Cuban-American musical group Fiesta Guajira performs traditional punto cubano on a Miami radio show, "La Cubanisma"; with various features including sung décimas, greetings to relatives in Cuba read over the air, call-in sections and décima contests. The group consists of: Ricardo Capote (vocal), Martica (vocal), Agapito Gonzalez (vocal), Miguel Ramirez (vocal), Berto Acebedo (laud), Teodoro Moya (guitar). For images, see S 1667, box 1, folder 12. The Dade Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1985 and 1986 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalas, Nancy Nusz and Laurie Sommers in order to identify folk arts and folk artists for the special folklife area at the 34th Annual Florida Folk Festival. The traditions are mainly Haitian, Jamaican, Mexican, Bahamian, Cuban and Jewish and cover a wide range of skills and art forms
Collection
Recording of Norteno accordion player Tomas Granado with apprentice Abraham Arrazola

Recording of Norteno accordion player Tomas Granado with apprentice Abraham Arrazola

Date
1991-11-25
Description
Two audio cassettes. Granado played Norteno music, named for its North Mexico origins. The genre can include corridos and rancheras. Both musicians played the button accordion. For more information on both musicians, see S 1644, box 10, folder 3. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by first folklorist Peter Roller, then folklorist Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Recording of Norteno accordion player Tomas Granado with apprentice Abraham Arrazola

Recording of Norteno accordion player Tomas Granado with apprentice Abraham Arrazola

Date
1992-04-02
Description
Two DAT tapes. Recorded in Granado's music store: T.G. Music. Tape 2 was unindexed. In between songs, they discussed their family and personal histories, how they learned to play, Granado played Norteno music, named for its North Mexico origins. The genre can include corridos and rancheras. Both musicians played the button accordion. For more information on both musicians, see S 1644, box 10, folder 3. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by first folklorist Peter Roller, then folklorist Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1576_t81-073Interviews with members of the Salsa ExpressSoundFieldwork
Arts, Cuban
Cuban Americans
Interviews
Singing
Music Latin America
Latinos
Music business
Singers
Bands (Music)
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s2029_01_tape08Los Fronterizos de Matamoros and Grupo Sensacion recording session.SoundSingers
Musicians
Accordionists
Fieldwork
Music performance
Latinos
Music Latin America
Arts, Mexican
Ethnicity, Mexico
Mexican Americans
Concerts
Conjunto music
Accordion music
Polka music
Bands (Music)
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s2029_01_tape09Mother's Day SerenadesSoundFieldwork
Arts, Mexican
Folk music Mexico
Mexican Americans
Music Latin America
Music performance
Latinos
Serenades
Serenatas
Songs
Mothers Day Songs and music
Mothers Day
Singers
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s2029_01_tape04Mother's Day Serenatas radio broadcastSoundFieldwork
Music performance
Radio programs
Radio stations
Radio broadcasters
Holidays
Calendar rites
Singing
Arts, Mexican
Folk music Mexico
Mexican Americans
Music Latin America
Latinos
Mothers Day
Mothers Day Songs and music
Songs
Serenades
Rites and ceremonies
Norteño music
Serenatas
Spanish language
Musicians
Bands (Music)
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s2029_01_tape14Music at the Cinco de Mayo FestivalSoundSingers
Musicians
Fieldwork
Cinco de Mayo (Mexican holiday)
Arts, Mexican
Mexican Americans
Performing arts
Music performance
Music Latin America
Latinos
Dance music
Musical groups
Bands (Music)
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t77-242Performances at the 1974 Florida Folk Festival (Main Stage) (Reel 4)SoundFestivals
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Singing
Guitar music
Folk singers
Old time music
String bands
Stringband music
Birdsongs
Animal calls
Animal sounds
Yodeling
Arts, Cuban
Music Latin America
Singers
Bands (Music)
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1640_23_tape08Recording of broadcast on Radio Continental (1430 AM)SoundFieldwork
Radio
Arts, Mexican
Mexican Americans
Performing arts
Music performance
Accordions
Latinos
Music Latin America
Norteño music
Radio broadcasters
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1576_22_c86-165Recording of Fiesta Guajira on WQBA radio stationSoundMusicians
Music performance
Spanish language
Fieldwork
Singing
Arts, Cuban
Cuban Americans
Radio programs
Radio stations
Decimas
Decimas, Cuban American (Spanish)
Latinos
Music Latin America
Bands (Music)
Radio broadcasters
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1640_23_tape09Recording of Norteno accordion player Tomas Granado with apprentice Abraham ArrazolaSoundFieldwork
Arts, Mexican
Mexican Americans
Performing arts
Music performance
Accordions
Latinos
Music Latin America
Norteño music
Musicians
Accordionists
Apprentices
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1640_23_tape11Recording of Norteno accordion player Tomas Granado with apprentice Abraham ArrazolaSoundFieldwork
Arts, Mexican
Mexican Americans
Performing arts
Music performance
Accordions
Latinos
Music Latin America
Norteño music
Musicians
Accordionists
Apprentices
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg