6 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Juke joints"
Sorted by Title
Interview with blues singer Marie Buggs

Interview with blues singer Marie Buggs

Date
1984-09-13
Description
Two audio cassettes. Born in Deer Park, Florida, in a turpentine camp in 1918, Buggs learned blues from her uncle Blind Blake and blues records. She discusses learning the blues; life at a turpentine camp; juke joints; jokes from the time; various blues singers: W.C. Handy, Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Billie Holiday, and Bessie Smith; blues clubs in Jacksonville; performing in New York City and across Europe; meaning of the blues; various blues styles; reactions to the blues across the world; and performers she met. She also sings several blues songs throughout the interview. A second interview held a couple of months can be found on C86-182. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Duval County was a joint venture between the Duval County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was started in 1984 by folklorist David Taylor with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, and in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. Taylor ran it until 1986. In 1988, Gregory Hansen re-initiated it with minor changes.
Collection
Interview with blues singer Marie Buggs

Interview with blues singer Marie Buggs

Date
1984-11-08
Description
One audio cassette. Born in Deer Park, Florida, in a turpentine camp in 1918, Buggs learned blues from her uncle Blind Blake and blues records. Much of this interview is a repeat of an earlier one (see C86-180/181), also by David Taylor. Here in addition to her early life and career, Buggs discusses her father's work turpentining and bootlegging; fellow blues performers; learning drums and playing at clubs and strip joints; teaching strippers to dance; performing with Josephine Baker; risqué songs; working with comedians like Nipsy Russell and Red Foxx; minstrel shows; Jacksonville blues clubs; and audiences in Europe. Again, she sings many songs from her repertoire. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Duval County was a joint venture between the Duval County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was started in 1984 by folklorist David Taylor with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, and in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist which included visits by local folk artists. Taylor ran it until 1986. In 1988, Gregory Hansen re-initiated it with minor changes.
Collection
Interview with Washboard Bill Cooke

Interview with Washboard Bill Cooke

Date
1987-08-10
Description
Two audio cassettes. Recorded at his home. Born in Dupont, just south of St. Augustine, on 4 July. His mother ran a jook joint, where he was first exposed to music and dance. He hoboed, played street music, worked for railways, and played at nightclubs in South Florida. In the interviews, he discusses jook joints; growing in East Florida; segregation; popular dances; building of the Dixie Highway; moving to New York; returning as a musician (washboard player) to West Palm Beach in 1947; his collection of black historical memorabilia; and his stories. In 1956, he made a recording with Pete Seeger and Sonny Terry called Washboard Country Band. In 1992, he won the Florida Folk Heritage Award. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Interview with Washboard Bill Cooke on entertainment in Florida

Interview with Washboard Bill Cooke on entertainment in Florida

Date
1987-08-18
Description
One audio cassette. Recorded at his home. Cooke discusses black entertainment in Florida. Born in Dupont, just south of St. Augustine, on 4 July, Cooke worked as a street performer, a jook joint musician, a nightclub entertainer, and a railway worker. His mother ran a jook joint, where he was first exposed to music and dance. In the interviews, he discusses jook joints; Florida minstrel acts such as Florida Blossom, Rabbit Foot, and Silas Green; black vaudeville in Florida; Ringling Brothers circus; segregation in theaters and entertainment; blackface; national entertainers he knew such as Amos and Andy, Step'n Fetchit, and Al Jolson; racism in advertising; and Pullman Porters he knew. In 1956, he made a recording with Pete Seeger and Sonny Terry called Washboard Country Band. In 1992, he won the Florida Folk Heritage Award. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Interviewer with quilter and former juke joint cook Ruth Rowe

Interviewer with quilter and former juke joint cook Ruth Rowe

Date
1985-01-09
Description
One audio cassette. Rowe was a quilter and a former juke (jook) joint cook. In this interview, she discusses both pursuits, as well as her family history and her time with the local Home Demonstration Clubs. For images of Rowe, see S 1577, v. 28, slides 2012-2043. In winter 1985, the Bureau contracted with two folklorists to conduct a folk arts survey of the St. Johns River basin in northeastern Florida. The St. Johns River is the largest and most used river in Florida, supporting much river commerce as well as a modest amount of commercial fishing. Folklorists Mary Anne McDonald and Kathleen Figgen conducted the survey from January through March 1985 under the direction of Folklife Coordinator Blanton Owen and Bureau Chief Ormond Loomis. Documentation compiled in the survey was used to prepare and present the 'St. Johns River Basin Folklife Area' at the 1985 Florida Folk Festival.
Collection
Washboard Bill Cooke interview for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Washboard Bill Cooke interview for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Date
1987-07-30
Description
One audio cassette. Recorded at his home. Born in Dupont, just south of St. Augustine, on 4 July. His mother ran a jook joint, where he was first exposed to music and dance. He hoboed, played street music, worked for railways, and played at nightclubs in South Florida. In the interviews, he discusses jook joints; writing songs; working in New York; playing the washboard and the ukulele; and plays various songs, some wellknown, others his own compositions. This interview was an exploratory interview for the Florida Folk Festival, and was expanded by Jan Rosenberg the following month. The tape speed is a little fast, noticeable in the higher pitch of their voices approximately half way through the tape. Side two is blank. In 1956, he made a recording with Pete Seeger and Sonny Terry called Washboard Country Band. In 1992, he won the Florida Folk Heritage Award. 
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1576_22_c86-180Interview with blues singer Marie BuggsSoundFieldwork
Interviews
Oral histories
Life histories
Blues (Music)
African Americans
Musical tradition, African diaspora
Music business
Music performance
Performing arts
Turpentine industry and trade
Singing
Juke joints
Jokes
Songs
Gospel songs
Blues singers
Entertainers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_22_c86-182Interview with blues singer Marie BuggsSoundFieldwork
Interviews
Oral histories
Life histories
Blues (Music)
African Americans
Musical tradition, African diaspora
Music business
Music performance
Performing arts
Turpentine industry and trade
Singing
Juke joints
Jokes
Songs
Gospel songs
Popular songs
Music industry
Nightclubs
Blues singers
Entertainers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1685_05_tape25Interview with Washboard Bill CookeSoundSingers
Storytellers
Fieldwork
Interviews
African Americans
Sound recordings
Oral histories
Life histories
Personal experience narratives
Juke joints
Music business
Storytelling
Music performance
Sawmills
Trains
Musical instruments
Washboards
Local history
Florida history
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1685_05_tape34Interview with Washboard Bill Cooke on entertainment in FloridaSoundSingers
Storytellers
Fieldwork
Interviews
African Americans
Sound recordings
Oral histories
Life histories
Personal experience narratives
Juke joints
Music business
Storytelling
Music performance
Minstrel shows
Trains
Jokes
Blackface entertainers
Entertainers
Florida history
Occupational groups
Television
Theater
Theatrical makeup
Racism
Racial segregation
Advertising
African Americans Segregation
Motion picture theaters
Vaudeville
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1714_03_tape01Interviewer with quilter and former juke joint cook Ruth RoweSoundQuiltmakers
Needleworkers
Cooks
Fieldwork
Needlework
Woven goods
Textile arts
Cooking and dining
Family history
Decorative arts
Domestic arts
African Americans
Quilted goods
Quilting
Quilts
Interviewing
Interviews
Oral histories
Oral narratives
Juke joints
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1685_05_tape27Washboard Bill Cooke interview for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education ProjectSoundSinging
Storytelling
Field recordings
Interviews
African Americans
Oral narratives
Juke joints
Music industry
Music composition
Washboards (musical instruments)
Chordophones
Ukuleles
Rural blues
Blues (music)
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg