99 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Ethnicity, Seminole"
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WPA field recordings in Mayport and Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Mayport and Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-06
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by FWP's folklore section between March and July 1940. A total of twenty-two 12-inch acetate records during that period. This recording includes African American shrimpers tap dancing in Mayport, and residents of Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation singing. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
Woodwork at Miccosukee Indian Reservation

Woodwork at Miccosukee Indian Reservation

Date
1987-09
Description
Seven color slides. Images are dark. The Florida Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1987 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalis, Steve Fragos, Merri Belland, and Barbara Seitz as preliminary research for a joint folk art between the Florida Folklife Program and the Florida Museum of History. The field researchers focused on those areas previously overlooked by FFP staff. The research focused on identifying folk artists and locating appropriate exhibit objects.
Collection
Traditional wooden spoon by John Willie at Miccosukee Indian Reservation

Traditional wooden spoon by John Willie at Miccosukee Indian Reservation

Date
1987-09
Description
Five color slides. The Florida Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1987 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalis, Steve Fragos, Merri Belland, and Barbara Seitz as preliminary research for a joint folk art between the Florida Folklife Program and the Florida Museum of History. The field researchers focused on those areas previously overlooked by FFP staff. The research focused on identifying folk artists and locating appropriate exhibit objects.
Collection
Tommy Jumper demonstrating Seminole foodways at the 1982 Florida Folk Festival

Tommy Jumper demonstrating Seminole foodways at the 1982 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1982-05
Description
Six color slides.
Collection
Thelma Boltin with Frank and Lottie Shore at the 1981 Florida Folk Festival

Thelma Boltin with Frank and Lottie Shore at the 1981 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1981-05
Description
Thirteen color slides.
Collection
The Craft Sales Area at the 1986 Florida Folk Festival

The Craft Sales Area at the 1986 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1986-05
Description
Thirty-one color slides.
Collection
The Annual Seminole Festival

The Annual Seminole Festival

Date
1988-02
Description
Seven color slides. Images of Seminoles performing various dances. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Susie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healing

Susie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healing

Date
1984-03-16
Description
140 color slides. Billie and Cypress were participants in the second year of the apprenticeship program. Images include the gathering of herbs and plants, forests around the reservation, and preparing medicine. Also includes images of folklorist Owen. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Susie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healing

Susie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healing

Date
1984-12
Description
Six proof sheets with 221 black and white images (plus negatives). Billie and Cypress were participants in the second year of the apprenticeship program. Images are of the gathering of herbs and plants, forests around the reservation, and preparing medicine. For images, see S 1577, v. 31. Also includes images of folklorist Owen. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year until 2003.
Collection
Susie Billie and apprentice Agnes Cypress gathering herbs

Susie Billie and apprentice Agnes Cypress gathering herbs

Date
1985-04
Description
One proof sheet with ten images (plus negatives). The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year until 2003.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1576_t86-253WPA field recordings in Mayport and Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation (March-July 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Native Americans
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Performing arts
Singing
Music performance
African Americans
Dance music
Tap dancers
Dancers
Shrimpers (persons)
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
Woodwork at Miccosukee Indian ReservationWoodwork at Miccosukee Indian ReservationStill ImageWoodworkers
Carvers (Decorative artists)
Wood carvers
Fieldwork
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Mikasuki Indians
Native Americans
Woodwork
Decorative arts
Animals
Indian reservations
Figurines
Material culture
Workplace
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Traditional wooden spoon by John Willie at Miccosukee Indian ReservationTraditional wooden spoon by John Willie at Miccosukee Indian ReservationStill ImageWoodworkers
Fieldwork
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Mikasuki Indians
Native Americans
Woodwork
Decorative arts
Spoons
Indian reservations
Wooden spoons
Material culture
Ladles (utensils)
Implements, utensils, etc.
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Tommy Jumper demonstrating Seminole foodways at the 1982 Florida Folk FestivalTommy Jumper demonstrating Seminole foodways at the 1982 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageFestivals
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Food habits
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Native Americans
Food preparation
Cooks
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Thelma Boltin with Frank and Lottie Shore at the 1981 Florida Folk FestivalThelma Boltin with Frank and Lottie Shore at the 1981 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageFestivals
Folklore revival festivals
Folk festivals
Oral communication
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Native Americans
Public speaking
Speeches, addresses, etc.
Orators
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
The Craft Sales Area at the 1986 Florida Folk FestivalThe Craft Sales Area at the 1986 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageCarvers (Decorative artists)
Wood carvers
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Festivals
Demonstrations
Craft
Selling
Baskets
Woodwork
Material culture
Gourds
Painting
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Dolls
Musical instruments
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
The Annual Seminole FestivalThe Annual Seminole FestivalStill ImageFieldwork
Festivals
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Demonstrations
Signs and signboards
Dance
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Susie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healingSusie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healingStill ImageHealer
Apprentices
Teaching of folklore
Native Americans
Seminole Indians
Ethnicity, Seminole
Herbs
Plants
Flora
Alternative medicine
Healers
Natural medicine
Forests and forestry
Ferns
Cooking and dining
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Susie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healingSusie Billie teaching Agness Cypress Seminole herbal healingStill ImageHealer
Herbalists
Apprentices
Teaching of folklore
Native Americans
Seminole Indians
Ethnicity, Seminole
Herbs
Healers
Plants
Flora
Alternative medicine
Natural medicine
Forests and forestry
Ferns
Cooking and dining
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Susie Billie and apprentice Agnes Cypress gathering herbsSusie Billie and apprentice Agnes Cypress gathering herbsStill ImageHealer
Herbalists
Apprentices
Women apprentices
Herbs
Plants
Flora
Medicine
Alternative medicine
Natural medicine
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Native Americans
Healers
Teaching of folklore
Clothing and dress
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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