68 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Embroidery"
Greek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Greek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts Festival

Date
1989-06-24
Description
Nineteen color slides. Greek embroidery displayed. Brief biographies of the embroiderers (some pictured) can be found in the folder. The festival was held June 24-25, 1989 to celebrate Tarpon Springs heritage of sponge diving, a practice that dated back to the 1890s. By 1905, when 500 Greek immigrants answered an ad to be sponge divers, the town acquired a distinctive Greek flavor, as the Greek Americans thrived in the sponge industry. At one point, Florida provided 95% of the nation's sponges. Although today over fishing and synthetic materials have undercut the sponge diving industry, the tradition lives on in Greek families, and through tourism.
Collection
Hardanger embroidery

Hardanger embroidery

Date
1987-10-10
Description
Ten color slides. Hardanger was a form of embroidery that dates back to the Renaissance, and began in Scandinavia. The Florida Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1987 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalis, Steve Fragos, Merri Belland, and Barbara Seitz as preliminary research for a joint folk art project between the Florida Folklife Program and the Florida Museum of History. The field researchers focused on areas previously overlooked by FFP staff. The research focused on identifying folk artists and locating appropriate exhibit objects.
Collection
Hardanger embroidery

Hardanger embroidery

Date
1987
Description
Two color prints. Hardanger was a form of embroidery that dates back to the Renaissance, and began in Scandinavia. The Florida Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1987 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalis, Steve Fragos, Merri Belland, and Barbara Seitz as preliminary research for a joint folk art between the Florida Folklife Program and the Florida Museum of History. The field researchers focused on those areas previously overlooked by FFP staff. The research focused on identifying folk artists and locating appropriate exhibit objects.
Collection
Hungarian embroiderer Margaret Horvath and apprentice Sylvia Daniels

Hungarian embroiderer Margaret Horvath and apprentice Sylvia Daniels

Date
Description
Three proof sheets with 92 black and white images. Both Daniels and Horvath were born in Budapest, Hungary. Hungarian embroidery dates back for centuries, with four major regions, each with their own distinctive patterns and motfis. Daniels worked as an apprentice to Horvath in 1990-1991. This was Horvath's second time as a master artist(she also participated in 1985). For information on them, see S 1644, box 8, folder 6. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Hungarian embroidery by Zita Mikita

Hungarian embroidery by Zita Mikita

Date
1984-12
Description
Seven color slides. Images created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. Slides S86-1761 and 1762 are missing. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Hungarian embroidery demonstration

Hungarian embroidery demonstration

Date
1983-09-24
Description
Twenty-seven color slides.
Collection
Images of the Big Bend Folklife Survey

Images of the Big Bend Folklife Survey

Date
1980
Description
One proof sheet with thirty-six black and white images, plus negatives. 1-22: Woody Woodward making his artificial worm fishing lures; 23-32: Czechoslovakian needlework; 33-36: fishing lures made by Woody Woodward. Woodward, with Al Jones, made artificial fishing worms out of plastic for sale in Happy's Bait and Tackle Shop in Inverness. Begun in the 1960s, the idea came to Woody and Al when they noticed that fish only struck worms that floated at the surface by their tails. Therefore, the made a lure to imitate that behavior.
Collection
Interview with embroiderer Margaret Horvath

Interview with embroiderer Margaret Horvath

Date
1991-07-24
Description
Two audio cassettes. For more information on Horvath, see S 1644, box 8, folder 6. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Interview with Hungarian embroiderers Margaret Horvath and Elizabeth Spreckelsen

Interview with Hungarian embroiderers Margaret Horvath and Elizabeth Spreckelsen

Date
1985-03-06
Description
One audio cassette. Spreckelsen apprenticed under Margaret Horvath in 1984-1985. Horvath was a Hungarian and moved to the U.S. in 1970. Spreckelsen was from a German American family in New York City. They discuss immigration; family history; learning embroidery; types of Hungarian embroidery; designs; and teaching embroidery. For a transcript, see S 1640, box 2, folder 9. Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Interview with migrant worker Consuelo Anguiano

Interview with migrant worker Consuelo Anguiano

Date
1985-09-09
Description
Two reel to reels (also copied onto audio cassettes: C86-49/50). Interview with Anguiano about life as a Chicano migrant farmer. Originally born in Texas, she was married to a migrant farmer. She discusses her family; Chicano versus Mexican American (differences in cooking and language); farming in Texas; picking tomatoes; living a middle class existence as a migrant family; on being Chicano; embroidery; and folk stories her Grandmother told her. A Chicano refers to one of Mexican descent born in the U.S. The Dade Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1986 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalas, Nancy Nusz and Laurie Sommers in order to identify folk arts and folk artists for the special folklife area at the 34th Annual Florida Folk Festival. The traditions are mainly Haitian, Jamaican, Mexican, Bahamian, Cuban and Jewish and cover a wide range of skills and art forms.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Greek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalGreek embroidery at the Sponge Industry Folk Arts FestivalStill ImageEmbroiderers
Needleworkers
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Folk festivals
Special events
Demonstrations
Embroidery
Needlework
Design
Material culture
Decorative arts
Craft
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Hardanger embroideryHardanger embroideryStill ImageEmbroiderers
Fieldwork
Textile arts
Embroidery
Hardanger needlework
Hardanger needlework Patterns
Decorative arts
Material culture
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Hardanger embroideryHardanger embroideryStill ImageNeedleworkers
Storytellers
Fieldwork
Embroidery
Hardanger needlework
Decorative arts
Material culture
Needlework
Hardanger needlework Patterns
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Hungarian embroiderer Margaret Horvath and apprentice Sylvia DanielsHungarian embroiderer Margaret Horvath and apprentice Sylvia DanielsStill ImageEmbroiderers
Needleworkers
Fieldwork
Arts, Hungarian
Hungarians Americans
Embroidery
Needlework
Textile arts
Sewing
Apprentices
Material culture
Decorative arts
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Hungarian embroidery by Zita MikitaHungarian embroidery by Zita MikitaStill ImageEmbroiderers
Needleworkers
Fieldwork
Embroidery
Needlework
Textile arts
Hungarians Americans
Sewing
Material culture
Design
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Hungarian embroidery demonstrationHungarian embroidery demonstrationStill ImageEmbroiderers
Needleworkers
Demonstrations
Embroidery
Hungarians Americans
Needlework
Sewing
Decorative arts
Design
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Images of the Big Bend Folklife SurveyImages of the Big Bend Folklife SurveyStill ImageFishing baits
Fishing lures
Baitworms
Worms
Material culture
Fishing tackle
Needlework
Textile arts
Embroidery
Fishing Equipment and supplies
Textiles
Artisans
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1640_22_tape19Interview with embroiderer Margaret HorvathSoundFieldwork
Interviews
Arts, Hungarian
Hungarians Americans
Embroidery
Needlework
Personal experience narratives
Life histories
Design
Embroiderers
Needleworkers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1640_20_tape10Interview with Hungarian embroiderers Margaret Horvath and Elizabeth SpreckelsenSoundNeedleworkers
Embroiderers
Apprentices
Interviews
Sound recordings
Emigration and immigration
Family history
Embroidery
Needlework
German Americans
Hungarians Americans
Teaching of folklore
Textile arts
Decorative arts
Design
Life histories
Oral histories
Occupational groups
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-004Interview with migrant worker Consuelo AnguianoSoundFieldwork
Sound recordings
Interviewing
Interviews
Oral histories
Life histories
Latinos
Mexican Americans
Mexican American cookery
Chicanos
Migrants
Farming
Storytelling
Harvesting
Cooking and dining
Tortillas
Food habits
Embroidery
Migrant workers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg