123 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Clothing and dress"
Boot maker Steve Ryan

Boot maker Steve Ryan

Date
1994-02-20
Description
Three proof sheets and 87 black and white images 9plus negatives). Images taken at the Kissimmee Rodeo.
Collection
Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)

Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)

Date
1986-04-19
Description
Forty-four color slides. Images from a Cambodian New Year's celebration for the year of the Tiger. Includes child dancers performing traditional dances (e.g. the Dancing Stone, the Celestial Dance, Legend of Mak Thoeung, and the Golden Fish) dressed in traditional Cambodian clothing. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Duval County was a joint venture between the Duval County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was started in 1984 by folklorist David Taylor with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. Taylor ran it until 1986. In 1988, Gregory Hansen re-initiated it with minor changes.
Collection
Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)

Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)

Date
1986-04-19
Description
Forty-four color slides. Images from a Cambodian New Years celebration for the Year of the Tiger. Includes child dancers performing traditional dances (e.g. the Dancing Stone, the Celestial Dance, Legend of Mak Thoeung, and the Golden Fish) dressed in traditional Cambodian clothing. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Duval County was a joint venture between the Duval County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was started in 1984 by folklorist David Taylor with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. Taylor ran it until 1986. In 1988, Gregory Hansen re-initiated it with minor changes.
Collection
Cayo Hueso Comparsa Dancers in Key West

Cayo Hueso Comparsa Dancers in Key West

Date
1991-03
Description
Five color slides. The dance troupe (comparsas) was founded by Emelia Fernandez in Key West. Danny Acosta led the band that accompanied the dances. The Cuban dance has African roots, and is usually performed in long conga lines. Dancers dress in elaborate, ruffled outfits. The tradition began in Key West in 1938. Emelia herself arrived in Florida in 1959. She and her daughter revived the dance tradition in the early 1990s. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Comparsa dancer Irene Fernandez at the Queen Cafe

Comparsa dancer Irene Fernandez at the Queen Cafe

Date
1991-03
Description
Eight color slides. Fernandez was a comparsa dancer, a skill she learned from her mother Emelia Fernandez, under whom she apprencticed. She also worked as a registered nurse. More information on Fernandez (mother and daughter) can be found in S 1644, box 10, fodler 13. Murphy was her apprentice in 1990-1991. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Comparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key West

Comparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key West

Date
1990
Description
Eight color prints, ten black and white prints, two proof sheets with 38 color images. Irene and Emelia served as master artists of the comparsas dance for several apprentices. The comparsas tradition was revived by Emelia Fernandez in Key West. Danny Acosta led the band that accompanied the dances. The Cuban dance has African roots and is usually performed in long conga lines. Dancers dress in elaborate, ruffled outfits. The tradition began in Key West in 1938. Emelia herself arrived in Florida in 1959. She and her daughter revived the dance tradition in the early 1990s. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Comparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key West

Comparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key West

Date
1991-07
Description
Twenty-eight color slides. Irene and Emelia served as master artists of the comparsas dance for several apprentices. The comparsas tradition was revived by Emelia Fernandez in Key West. Danny Acosta led the band that accompanied the dances. The Cuban dance has African roots, and is usually performed in long conga lines. Dancers dress in elaborate, ruffled outfits. The tradition began in Key West in 1938. Emelia herself arrived in Florida in 1959. She and her daughter revived the dance tradition in the early 1990s. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Creek dancers at the Great Gulf Coast Arts festival

Creek dancers at the Great Gulf Coast Arts festival

Date
1981-01-19
Description
Eighteen color slides. Images are of a Creek Indian dance demonstration, with traditional Creek Indian dress.
Collection
Creek Indian artist Fred Beaver

Creek Indian artist Fred Beaver

Date
1958-05
Description
Seven photographic prints. Image of Fred Beaver in traditional Oklahoma Creek dress posing for photographs at the Florida Folk Festival. Beaver was a well-known painter whose ancestors were related to the Florida Seminoles. Also visible in one the images is Florida photographer Robert Leahey. Beaver often spoke at the festivals, where he also usually displayed his paintings. Included with the photographs are several pieces of correspondence between Beaver and the Festival directors.
Collection
Cuban dancers from Jacksonville performing at the Florida Folk Festival

Cuban dancers from Jacksonville performing at the Florida Folk Festival

Date
1970
Description
Four black and white prints. Images of an unidentified Cuban dance group from Jacksonville, accompanied by a Cuban band, performing at the Florida Folk Festival.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Boot maker Steve RyanBoot maker Steve RyanStill ImageFieldwork
Shoemaking
Boots
Clothing and dress
Workshops
Workplace
Material culture
Rodeo
Shoemakers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)Still ImageCambodian Americans
Asian Americans
Arts, Asian
Folk dance
Body movement
Children
Holidays and festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Clothing and dress
Asian American arts
Community rites
Calendar rites
New Year rites
Dancers
Students
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)Cambodian New Years Celebration (Year of the Tiger)Still ImageCambodian Americans
Asian Americans
Arts, Asian
Folk dance
Body movement
Children
Holidays and festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Clothing and dress
Asian American arts
Community rites
Calendar rites
New Year rites
Dancers
Students
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Cayo Hueso Comparsa Dancers in Key WestCayo Hueso Comparsa Dancers in Key WestStill ImageFieldwork
Dance
Clothing and dress
Costumes
Arts, Cuban
Cuban Americans
Comparsa tradition
Children
Body movement
Streets
Community culture
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Comparsa dancer Irene Fernandez at the Queen CafeComparsa dancer Irene Fernandez at the Queen CafeStill ImageFieldwork
Dance
Clothing and dress
Costumes
Arts, Cuban
Cuban Americans
Architecture
Signs (commercial)
Nightclubs
Community enterprise
Community culture
Comparsa tradition
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Comparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key WestComparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key WestStill ImageFieldwork
Apprentices
Teaching of folklore
Body movement
Clothing and dress
Arts, Cuban
Cuban Americans
Comparsa tradition
Dance
Latinos
Festivals
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Comparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key WestComparsa dancers Irene and Emelia Fernandez with their apprentices in Key WestStill ImageFieldwork
Apprentices
Teaching of folklore
Body movement
Clothing and dress
Arts, Cuban
Cuban Americans
Comparsa tradition
Dance
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Creek dancers at the Great Gulf Coast Arts festivalCreek dancers at the Great Gulf Coast Arts festivalStill ImageFolklore revival festivals
Folk festivals
Festivals
Special events
Clothing and dress
Demonstrations
Native Americans
Creek Indians
Indian dance
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Creek Indian artist Fred BeaverCreek Indian artist Fred BeaverStill ImageOrators
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Native Americans
Creek Indians
Photography
Clothing and dress
Costumes
Musical instruments
Artists
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Cuban dancers from Jacksonville performing at the Florida Folk FestivalCuban dancers from Jacksonville performing at the Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageFolk dance
Musicians
Clothing and dress
Body movement
Performing arts
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Dancers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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