9 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Ball games"
Sorted by Title
Fieldwork images of the Jumpers' home at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation

Fieldwork images of the Jumpers' home at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation

Date
1982-01
Description
One proof sheet with 22 black and white images (plus negatives). Images of Joe Jumper with ball sticks. Tommy Jumper and Judy Bill Osceola sewing patchwork; also Tommy Jumper cooking in her chickee. Several images of the Jumper's home and yard. And three images of Bert Billie.
Collection
Interview with Carol Cypress

Interview with Carol Cypress

Date
1983-08-10
Description
Three reel to reels (also copied onto C84-112/114). Cypress talks about Seminole culture. She discusses the role of television; Mikasuki language; the effect of drainage canals on leisure activities; air conditioning; healers; marriages; parental discipline; food such as sofke and coontie palm; stick ball game; influence of Western society upon Seminole culture; education; drug use on reservations; lullabies; traditional songs; and basket making. The Seminole Video Project was a joint project between the Florida Folklife Program and WFSU-TV. Completed in Spring 1984, and financed by a Florida Endowment for the Humanities grant with the support of the Seminole Tribe of Florida, the project culminated in a thirty-minute documentary entitled "Four Corners of the Earth" which profiled Ethel Santiago, a Seminole craftswoman and Tribal representative. The program addressed such issues as cultural retention within contemporary society; the role of women in Seminole society; traditional Seminole foods, arts, and medicine; and the changing emphasis on clan affiliations. The project covered Seminoles on the Big Cypress and Hollywood Reservations and at Immokalee, Florida. Raw video footage, along with the finished product, can be found in S 1615, V84-16 through V-84-24. Images from the project can be found in S 1577, v. 23, slides S83-2994 - S83-3020.
Collection
Interview with Pat Diamond

Interview with Pat Diamond

Date
1983-08-10
Description
Two reel to reels (also copied onto C84-111/112). Diamond, a secretary to Seminole Chairman Jim Billie, discusses culture on Seminole reservations. Topics include native languages; expanding reservation land; marrying non-Indians; teaching culture to children; reservation and tribal politics; role of women in tribal politics; recent reservation projects; changes that bingo has brought to the reservations; cattle ranching; selling traditional crafts; role of television in Seminole lives; medicine; cultural identification; stick ball games; and tourism. The Seminole Video Project was a joint project between the Florida Folklife Program and WFSU-TV. Completed in Spring 1984, and financed by a Florida Endowment for the Humanities grant with the support of the Seminole Tribe of Florida, the project culminated in a thirty-minute documentary entitled "Four Corners of the Earth" which profiled Ethel Santiago, a Seminole craftswoman and Tribal representative. The program addressed such issues as cultural retention within contemporary society; the role of women in Seminole society; traditional Seminole foods, arts, and medicine; and the changing emphasis on clan affiliations. The project covered Seminoles on the Big Cypress and Hollywood Reservations and at Immokalee, Florida. Raw video footage, along with the finished product, can be found in S 1615, V84-16 through V-84-24. Images from the project can be found in S 1577, v. 23, slides S83-2994 - S83-3020.
Collection
James Hancock talking with students for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

James Hancock talking with students for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Date
1986-02-12
Description
Seminole storyteller Hancock describes how he learned stories from several Seminole elders, including Billy Bowlegs III, even though he spent little time on reservations as his father worked for the US Corps of Engineers. Students ask Hancock extensively about Seminole life and the tribe's leadership, hunting, games, clans, religion, holidays, and chickees. Afterwards, he tells origin stories, including "How the Sun Came to Be," "How the Stars Came to Be," and "How the Mosquitos Came to Be."
Collection
Joe Jumper demonstrating the use of ball game sticks

Joe Jumper demonstrating the use of ball game sticks

Date
1982
Description
Three color slides. The images were created for the Florida Folklife Program's Seminole Slide and Tape Project, a program sponsored by the American Express Company in 1982-1983 to create two educational slide/tape programs for use by schools, community groups, and other educational outlets. One program dealt with sweetgrass basket making; the other with traditional Seminole patchwork. Recordings of the finished program tapes may be found in S 1576, Box 10. Teacher guides, program scripts, and documentation of the project can be found in S 1595, Box 1.
Collection
Merle Rodgers interview for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Merle Rodgers interview for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project

Date
1986-08-19
Description
Two audio cassettes. Rodgers grew up in Kingston, Jamaican before moving to New York City. As an adult, she moved to Florida. She discusses children's games such as The Wolf and Zim, Zim, Zee; jump rope rhymes; children songs; holidays such as Jamaican Independence Day (Jonkonnu); ball games; and chanting games. She also discusses Jamaican foodways. 
Collection
Seminole children playing traditional stickball

Seminole children playing traditional stickball

Date
1989-01
Description
Twenty-eight color slides. The traditional stick ball game, played by many Southeastern indigenous peoples, dates back to Precolumbian times. The game consists of a small ball made of deer hide which is struck with sticks (similar to LaCrosse in Europe) to strike a pole -- or an object on top of the pole. The game often is embued with religious and political meanings. Similar images can be found in S 1577, v. 49 and v 50. The images were created in part for use in an exhibit on Seminole culture at the Museum of Florida History.
Collection
Seminole children playing traditional stickball

Seminole children playing traditional stickball

Date
1989-01
Description
Fifty-one color slides. The traditional stick ball game, played by many Southeastern indigenous peoples, dates back to Precolumbian times. The game consists of a small ball made of deer hide which is struck with sticks (similar to LaCrosse in Europe) to strike a pole -- or an object on top of the pole. The game often is embued with religious and political meanings. Similar images can be found in S 1577, v. 48 and v 50. The images were created in part for use in an exhibit on Seminole culture at the Museum of Florida History.
Collection
Seminole children playing traditional stickball

Seminole children playing traditional stickball

Date
Description
Five color slides. The traditional stick ball game, played by many Southeastern indigenous peoples, dates back to Precolumbian times. The game consists of a small ball made of deer hide which is struck with sticks (similar to LaCrosse in Europe) to strike a pole -- or an object on top of the pole. The game often is embued with religious and political meanings. Similar images can be found in S 1577, v. 49 and v 48. The images were created in part for use in an exhibit on Seminole culture at the Museum of Florida History.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Fieldwork images of the Jumpers' home at Big Cypress Seminole Indian ReservationFieldwork images of the Jumpers' home at Big Cypress Seminole Indian ReservationStill ImageNeedleworkers
Cooks
Fieldwork
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Seminole cookery
Native Americans
Ball games
Recreation
Leisure
Games
Machine sewing
Patchwork
Sewing machines
Sewing
Needlework
Chickee
Mobile homes
Architecture
Domestic arts
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1576_t84-120Interview with Carol CypressSoundFieldwork
Interviews
Sound recordings
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Native Americans
Politics and culture
Stick ball
Ball games
Leisure
Indian Americans
Food preparation
Food habits
Material culture
Family history
Bingo
Education
Sewing
Religion
Beliefs and cultures
Women
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t84-118Interview with Pat DiamondSoundSecretaries
Fieldwork
Interviews
Sound recordings
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Native Americans
Politics and culture
Stick ball
Ball games
Leisure
Indian Americans
Politicians
Tourism
Material culture
Family history
Bingo
Education
Sewing
Religion
Beliefs and cultures
Women
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1685_05_tape21James Hancock talking with students for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education ProjectsoundStorytellers
Children
Students
Field recordings
Interviews
Oral histories
Seminole Indians
Native Americans
Ball games
Storytelling
Tales
Oral narratives
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
Joe Jumper demonstrating the use of ball game sticksJoe Jumper demonstrating the use of ball game sticksStill ImageSeminole Indians
Native Americans
Mikasuki Indians
Indian reservations
Ball games
Games
Community culture
Material culture
Leisure
Demonstrations
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1685_07_tape05Merle Rodgers interview for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education ProjectSoundField recordings
Cooking
Jamaican Americans
Immigration
Oral narratives
Interviews
Ball games
Children's songs
Entertainment and recreation
Chanting
Jump rope rhymes
Junkanoo
Holidays
Foodways
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
Seminole children playing traditional stickballSeminole children playing traditional stickballStill ImageSeminole Indians
Mikasuki Indians
Native Americans
Games
Leisure
Indian reservations
Contests
Ball games
Stick ball
Play areas
Play
Entertainment
Sports
Children
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Seminole children playing traditional stickballSeminole children playing traditional stickballStill ImageSeminole Indians
Mikasuki Indians
Native Americans
Games
Leisure
Indian reservations
Contests
Ball games
Stick ball
Play areas
Play
Entertainment
Sports
Children
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Seminole children playing traditional stickballSeminole children playing traditional stickballStill ImageSeminole Indians
Mikasuki Indians
Native Americans
Games
Leisure
Indian reservations
Contests
Ball games
Stick ball
Play areas
Play
Entertainment
Sports
Children
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg