53 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Arts, Japanese"
Sorted by Title
Atsuko Lefcounte teaching her apprentices about ikebana

Atsuko Lefcounte teaching her apprentices about ikebana

Date
1988-03-14
Description
One audio cassette. Master folk artist Lefcourte took on two apprentices in 1988, Levanthal and McGlamory. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan, where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Date
1988-03
Description
Four proof sheets with 98 black and white images (plus negatives). Master folk artist Lefcourte took on two apprentices in 1988: Levanthal and McGlamory. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan, where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebana

Date
1988-03
Description
Forty-six color slides. Master folk artist Lefcourte took on two apprentices in 1988: Levanthal and McGlamory. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan, where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Atsuko Lefcourte demonstrating Japanese Tea Ceremony and flower arranging (ikebana)

Atsuko Lefcourte demonstrating Japanese Tea Ceremony and flower arranging (ikebana)

Date
1986-08-23
Description
Twenty-one color slides. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Atsuko Lefourte performing the Japanese tea ceremony

Atsuko Lefourte performing the Japanese tea ceremony

Date
1987-03-07
Description
Ten color slides. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. For more info on Lefcourte, see S 1644, box 3, folder 11. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Bon Festival at the Morikami Museum

Bon Festival at the Morikami Museum

Date
1987-08-16
Description
Eighteen color slides. The Bon Festival is the Morikami Museum version of Obon (Ullambana), a traditional three-day Japanese festival to honor the dead. Traditionally, the day ends with lighted lanterns to guide souls back to the afterlife. In additions to the lanterns, images of the Bon Festival feature folk dancing, street performers, Japanese cultural demonstrations, and Taiku drumming. The festival was held each August. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Chieri Esposito making temari

Chieri Esposito making temari

Date
1985-07
Description
Ten color slides. Espasito, daughter to master folk artist Kasuko Law, making temari. She served as apprentice to Law in 1984-1985. Temari is the traditional Japanese art of decorating spheres by winding and lacing colored threads in intricate patterns around a core ball. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Demonstration of Ikebana (traditional Japanese flower arranging)

Demonstration of Ikebana (traditional Japanese flower arranging)

Date
1987-03-11
Description
Fifteen color slides. Demonstration for West Riviera Elementary School students. Ikebana (Way of the Flower) is the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. It originated in China in the 6th century. Lefcourte was born in Osaka, Japan where she learned the art of the tea ceremony and flower arranging. She moved to Florida in 1975. The Folk Arts in Education Project in Palm Beach County was a joint venture between the Palm Beach County School System and the Florida Folklife Program. It was conducted between 1986 and 1987 by folklorist Jan Rosenberg with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts to add to existing social studies curriculum. The goal was to impart an appreciation of multi-ethnic traditions and provide a sense of place to the mobile student population. The project focused on the Florida Studies component for fourth grade students. The project consisted of field research to identify local traditions and folk artists, a series of five two-day seminars to acquaint teachers with the use of folklore and folk arts, in-school programs conducted by a folklorist and traditionalist, which included visits by local folk artists. In total, the project involved 15 schools with 779 students.
Collection
Folklife apprentices at the 1995 Florida Folk Festival

Folklife apprentices at the 1995 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1995-05-28
Description
Twenty-six color slides. Toro Huaco were a Nicaraguan dance group, including Jose Silva and his apprentice Jose Silva. They were from Pembroke Pines. Hymn liner Demps and his apprentice Wright; both were from Orlando. And Japanese dancer Kazuko Law (of Gulf Breeze) with her apprentice Ofuyu Raiko Forrest (of Pensacola). They performed as Wako Kai. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through at least 2006.
Collection
Friday performances at the 1995 Florida Folk Festival (Old Marble Stage) (Tape 1)

Friday performances at the 1995 Florida Folk Festival (Old Marble Stage) (Tape 1)

Date
1995-05-26
Description
One digital audio tape (DAT). Williams served as emcee. Picalota Strings featured Dave Fullerton (chorded zither), Joseph Johnson (guitar), Rob Blount (bass), and Bill Lapin (mandolin). Wako Kai were Japanese dancers from Pensacola (Chiyo Smith and Fay Geis). On the original index sheet, Kazuko Law wrote the name of the dancers in traditional Japanese script. Sparky and the Pole Cats featured Ira Kohn (banjo), Joe Nelson (fiddle), Dave Borland (fiddle), and Marion Lasley (guitar). Old Tiem Friends featured Don Moores (guitar0, Jim Kaufman (dobro), Jan Moores (autoharp) and Don Meyers (bass.) Caracappa was a banjoist-guitarist from Miami.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1640_20_tape20Atsuko Lefcounte teaching her apprentices about ikebanaSoundArtisans
Flower arrangers
Apprentices
Arts, Japanese
Flower arrangement, Japanese
Flowers
Japanese Americans
Asian American arts
Asians
Oral communication
Oral performance
Lecturers
Sound recordings
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaAtsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaStill ImageArtisans
Flower arrangers
Apprentices
Flowers
Arts, Asian
Asian American arts
Asian Americans
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Material culture
Plants
Decorative arts
Decoration and ornament
Teaching of folklore
Flower arrangement, Japanese
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Atsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaAtsuko Lefcourte and her apprentices demonstrating ikebanaStill ImageArtisans
Flower arrangers
Apprentices
Flowers
Arts, Asian
Asian American arts
Asian Americans
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Material culture
Plants
Decorative arts
Decoration and ornament
Teaching of folklore
Flower arrangement, Japanese
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Atsuko Lefcourte demonstrating Japanese Tea Ceremony and flower arranging (ikebana)Atsuko Lefcourte demonstrating Japanese Tea Ceremony and flower arranging (ikebana)Still ImageTea masters
Flower arrangers
Fieldwork
Flower arrangement, Japanese
Flowers
Rites and ceremonies
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Asian Americans
Asian American arts
Food preparation
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Atsuko Lefourte performing the Japanese tea ceremonyAtsuko Lefourte performing the Japanese tea ceremonyStill ImageFieldwork
Flower arrangement, Japanese
Flowers
Japanese tea ceremony
Japanese tea masters
Food preparation
Drink
Japanese Americans
Arts, Japanese
Demonstrations
Flower arrangers
Tea masters
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Bon Festival at the Morikami MuseumBon Festival at the Morikami MuseumStill ImagePerformers
Drummers (Musicians)
Fieldwork
Festivals
Holidays and festivals
Japanese Americans
Arts, Japanese
Asian Americans
Asian American arts
Arts, Asian
Clothing and dress
Kimonos
Ullambana
Festivals Japan
Lanterns
Drums
Percussion instruments
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Chieri Esposito making temariChieri Esposito making temariStill ImageHealer
Paper art
Paper work
Fieldwork
Apprentices
Arts, Japanese
Arts, Asian
Temari
Origami
Japanese Americans
Needlework
Craft
Material culture
Decorative arts
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Demonstration of Ikebana (traditional Japanese flower arranging)Demonstration of Ikebana (traditional Japanese flower arranging)Still ImageTea masters
Flower arrangers
Fieldwork
Classrooms
Schools
Elementary schools
Education
Teaching of folklore
Demonstrations
Flower arrangement, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Arts, Japanese
Arts, Asian
Asian American arts
Asian Americans
Flowers
Japanese tea ceremony
Children
Students
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Folklife apprentices at the 1995 Florida Folk FestivalFolklife apprentices at the 1995 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageMusical groups
Performers
Folklore revival festivals
Folk festivals
Music
Performing arts
Latinos
Arts, Nicaraguan
Nicaraguan Americans
Apprentices
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
Hymn lining
African Americans
Dancers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1576_44_d95-001Friday performances at the 1995 Florida Folk Festival (Old Marble Stage) (Tape 1)SoundFolk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Music performance
Singing
String bands
Stringband music
Old time music
Guitar music
Japanese Americans
Arts, Japanese
Clogging
Clog dancing
Singers
Musicians
Dancers
Bands (Music)
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg