104 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "Arts, Greek"
Sorted by Title
WPA field recordings of a dedication ceremony in Tarpon Springs (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings of a dedication ceremony in Tarpon Springs (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-05-12
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by FWP's folklore section between March and July 1940. A total of twenty-two 12-inch acetate records during that period. On this recording by Flareton, the greek community of Tarpon Springs held a deication to a building erected by the Ladies Society, Piloptohus (Friend of the Poor). Includes speeches, dances, and song. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Tarpon Springs and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

WPA field recordings at Tarpon Springs and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

Date
1939-08-25
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Morris of the University of Florida, assisted by workers of the Florida Writers Project (including photographer Robert Cook), in 1939 and 1940. He created 14 12-inch acetate records in total. On this recording, Morris visited Tarpon Springs, and the Czechoslovakian community of Slavia, founded in 1911. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Jacksonville, Tarpon Springs, St. Augustine, and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

WPA field recordings at Jacksonville, Tarpon Springs, St. Augustine, and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)

Date
1939-08-26
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Morris of the University of Florida, assisted by workers of the Florida Writers Project (including photographer Robert Cook), in 1939 and 1940. He created 14 12-inch acetate records in total. On this recording, Morris recorded Greek singers in Tarpon Springs and Jacksonville, Minorcans in St. Augustine, and unidentified singers from the Czechoslovakian community of Slavia, founded in 1911. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings at Gainesville, Raiford, Panama City, and Jacksonville

WPA field recordings at Gainesville, Raiford, Panama City, and Jacksonville

Date
1939-10-04
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created the Lomaxes and Morris of the University of Florida, assisted by workers of the Florida Writers Project (including photographer Robert Cook), in 1939 and 1949. Morris created 14 12-inch acetate records in total. On his 1939 trip, he recorded Greek singers in Jacksonville; in 1949, he recorded Sacred Harp singers in Gainesville, and local singers in Jacksonville and Panama City. The Lomax recordings are from a 1939 trip to the State Prison Farm in Raiford ("Job Job" was recorded in Livingston, Alabama). For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
Videos of still photographs for the Every Island Has Its Own Song documentary

Videos of still photographs for the Every Island Has Its Own Song documentary

Date
1987
Description
One video recording (3/4 tape; 16 minutes) Video of Tsimouris family photographs for use in the Every Island Has Its Own Song documentary. Images include life in Greece and Florida, the Tsimouris family (swimming, vacationing, weddings, and family gatherings), the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, and scenes of Greece. The finished product was a co-production of WEDO-TV and the FFP, it was funded in part by the Florida Endowment for the Humanities. Offenbach narrated. Folklorist Michael wrote and produced, and Yvonne Bryant was assistant producer.
Collection
Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his family

Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his family

Date
1985-04
Description
Seventeen color slides. Tsabouna is made from sheep's skin (also known as a Greek bagpipe). Images created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his family

Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his family

Date
1985-01
Description
Thirty color slides. Tsabouna is made from sheep's skin (also known as a Greek bagpipe). Images created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home

Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home

Date
1984-11
Description
Ten color slides. Tsabouna is made from sheep's skin (also known as a Greek bagpipe). Images created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
The First Helenic Arts Festival

The First Helenic Arts Festival

Date
1980
Description
Fourteen color slides. Images include Tsimouris playing the tsabouna (Greek bag pipe); Skordilis playing the bouzouki (a stringed musical instrument); and various craft booths. Held in Fall 1980.
Collection
Sunday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Performance Stage) (Tape 7)

Sunday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Performance Stage) (Tape 7)

Date
1996-05-26
Description
One audio cassette tape. Irene Matsangos and the Greek dancers continue from C96-124. Kazuko Law and Wako Kai perform Japanese dance: Heisei Iwai; Okasa Wakari Bushi; Heisei Raman; "Moonlight at the Ruined Castle"; Kawachi Otoko Busiti".
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
a_s1576_t86-252WPA field recordings of a dedication ceremony in Tarpon Springs (March-July 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Choir singing
Performing arts
Dedications
Music performance
Singing
Dance music
Religious music
Religious rites
Ballads
Speeches, addresses, etc.
Songs, Greek
Musicians
Dancers
Priests
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-224WPA field recordings at Tarpon Springs and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Arts, Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakian Americans
Songs, Greek
Songs, Slavic
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-225WPA field recordings at Jacksonville, Tarpon Springs, St. Augustine, and Slavia (1939-1940 recording expedition: Alton Morris)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Arts, Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakian Americans
Songs, Greek
Songs, Slavic
Minorcans
Minorcan Americans
Love songs
Christmas music
Carols
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-226WPA field recordings at Gainesville, Raiford, Panama City, and JacksonvilleSoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Religious music
Religious songs
Musical tradition, sacred
Shape note singing
Church membership
Drinking songs
Love songs
Sea shanties
Play party songs
Musicians
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
Videos of still photographs for the Every Island Has Its Own Song documentaryVideos of still photographs for the Every Island Has Its Own Song documentaryMoving ImageMusicians
Documentary videos
Photography
Bagpipes
Tsabouna
Material culture
Instrument manufacture
Musical instruments
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Family history
Epiphany
Religious rites
Religious symbolism
Religious art
Catholics
Religion
Stained glass
Church buildings
Church decoration and ornament
Bagpipers
Musical instrument maker
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_video.jpg
Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his familyTsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his familyStill ImageFieldwork
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Bagpipers
Bagpipes
Arts, Greek
Musical instruments
Music performance
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his familyTsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his home for his familyStill ImageFieldwork
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Bagpipers
Bagpipes
Arts, Greek
Musical instruments
Music performance
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Tsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his homeTsabouna player Nikitas Tsimouris playing in his homeStill ImageFieldwork
Greek Americans
Tsabouna
Bagpipers
Bagpipes
Arts, Greek
Musical instruments
Music performance
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
The First Helenic Arts FestivalThe First Helenic Arts FestivalStill ImageArts, Greek
Bouzouki
Tsabouna
Music performance
Greek Americans
Festivals
Material culture
Demonstrations
Bagpipes
Bagpipers
String instruments
Musical instruments
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1576_65_c96-125Sunday program at the 1996 Florida Folk Festival (Folklife Area Performance Stage) (Tape 7)SoundDancers
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Festivals
Special events
Performing arts
Asian American arts
Dance
Apprentices
Arts, Greek
Greek Americans
Dance music
Arts, Japanese
Japanese Americans
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
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