1136 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Subject is exactly "African Americans"
Sorted by Title
Zora Neale Hurston's grave site

Zora Neale Hurston's grave site

Date
1987
Description
Four color slides. Zora Neale Hurston was a major literary figure, known as one of the nation's preeminent African American writers, with such titles as Their Eyes Were Watching God. She was from Eatonville, and had studied anthropology under Franz Boaz. In 1959, after suffering a stroke, Hurston was forced to enter a welfare home where she died in 1960. She was buried in an unmarked grave and her work languished in relative obscurity until 1975, when famed novelist Alice Walker published the article "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston" in Ms. magazine. In the article, Walker recounts her experiences of searching for, finding, and marking Hurston's grave. The Florida Folk Arts Survey was conducted in 1987 by folklorists Tina Bucuvalis, Steve Fragos, Merri Belland, and Barbara Seitz as preliminary research for a joint folk art between the Florida Folklife Program and the Florida Museum of History. The field researchers focused on those areas previously overlooked by FFP staff. The research focused on identifying folk artists and locating appropriate exhibit objects.
Collection
Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991

Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991

Date
1991-01
Description
One proof sheet with thirty-six black and white images. Zora Neale Hurston was a major literary figure, known as one of the nation's preeminent African American writers. She was from Eatonville. Now, each January, the town holds a festival in her honor. 1-2: Jamie Lee Harell; 3-4: Orlando School of Culture and Dance performing; 5-11: Vaughan McCall demonstrating hair styling; 12-14: Washington Sisters singing a capella; 15-18: Gloria's Hats 19-21: Elden Earl Madison 22-36: St. James Church worshiping (33-36: Rev. Nolan Pitts preaching).
Collection
Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991

Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991

Date
1991-01
Description
One proof sheet with thirty-six black and white prints. Zora Neale Hurston was a major literary figure, known as one of the nation's preeminent African American writers. She was from Eatonville. Now, each January, the town holds a festival in her honor. 1-4: Festival organizer David Closson; 5-6: Conch and crab fritters by Deborah Chester; 7-12: Good Samaritan foods (BBQ); 13-14: painting called "Wandering Feather;" 15-16: Jewelry maker; 17-19: Clark Fashions; 20-26: George Alexander making BBQ; 27-30: Unidentified; 31-36: Patti's Thing (Jamaican pattie).
Collection
Writers' panel at the Zora Neale Hurston Festival

Writers' panel at the Zora Neale Hurston Festival

Date
1990-01-25
Description
One black and white proof sheet with forty-five images; thirty-five color slides. A panel discussion of Zora Neale Hurston life and work. Panel included Alice Walker and Zora's relative Lucy Hurston. This was the festival's first year.
Collection
WPA recordings featuring Zora Neale Hurston

WPA recordings featuring Zora Neale Hurston

Date
1935
Description
One audio cassette. (Also on C87-24.) Compilation of all of the Zora Neale Hurston-related WPA recordings. The originals are housed at the Library of Congress. She worked for the WPA in 1935 and in 1939. Zora Neale Hurston was a major literary figure, known as one of the nation's preeminent African American writers, with such titles as Their Eyes Were Watching God. She was from Eatonville, and had studied anthropology under Franz Boaz. In 1959, after suffering a stroke, Hurston was forced to enter a welfare home where she died in 1960. She was buried in an unmarked grave and her work languished in relative obscurity until 1975, when famed novelist Alice Walker published the article "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston" in Ms. magazine. For more on Hurston, see the FloridaMemory web page: http://www.floridamemory.com/OnlineClassroom/zora_hurston/
Collection
WPA field recordings in Sebring (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Sebring (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-07
Description
One reel to reel. (Copied onto audio cassettes C90-37/38 in S 1576.) These recordings were created by FWP's folklore section between March and July 1940. A total of twenty-two 12-inch acetate records during that period. Included on this recording are fiddle music, and sining by a 101 year-old ex-slave (Lassiter) in Sebring. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Riviera  and Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Riviera and Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-01-15
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording, Wilbur Roberts tells stories in Riviera; the Nelsons sing traditional Bahamian songs, and Rolle in Key West plays with his band on several songs. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida's FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art's Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida's WPA program by the Library of Congress' Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Raiford and in Alachua County  (1936-1937 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Raiford and in Alachua County (1936-1937 recording expedition)

Date
1936
Description
One reel to reel. (Copied onto audio cassette C87-29/30) These recordings were from the 1936-1937 expedition by John Lomax. In these recordings he visited the Florida State Prison in Raiford, and Alachua County. Not all the prisoners/performers were identified. Griffin lived in Newberry. These were the second of several WPA recording expeditions in Florida. At the time Lomax was in charge of the folklife section of the Federal Writers Project. He left that position in 1938, and in 1939 returned to Florida (including Raiford and Alachua County). See the online exhibit about that 1939 expedition at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/lohtml/lohome.html For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida's FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art's Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida's WPA program by the Library of Congress' Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Mayport and Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Mayport and Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation (March-July 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-06
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by FWP's folklore section between March and July 1940. A total of twenty-two 12-inch acetate records during that period. This recording includes African American shrimpers tap dancing in Mayport, and residents of Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation singing. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)

WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)

Date
1940-01
Description
One reel to reel. These recordings were created by Florida folklorist Kennedy and photographer Cook in January 1940. They created a total of eighteen 12-inch acetate records that month. On this recording Rolle plays with his band on several Bahamian folk songs in Key West; White telling stories and songs; and the 85 year old Barnwell, who grew up on a plantation in Nassau County. She tells stories of her 'mammies,' and sings songs from her childhood. For more detailed information on the recordings, see S 1579, box 3, for copies of the original LOC indexes. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) – after 1939, the Works Projects Administration – was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Roosevelt Administration that employed over 8.5 million people between 1935 and 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included the Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. Originally created to gather material for the American Guide Series, but later emphasis was placed upon fieldwork for preservation of folk traditions for future use. In Florida, the FWP was based out of Jacksonville, and directed by historian Carita Doggett Corse. Folklorist Stetson Kennedy directed the Florida Folklife section. Seven recording expeditions were conducted in Florida. Two were conducted between 1935 and 1937, before the creation of the Florida Folklore Section: one by Alan Lomax and Zora Neale Hurston, and the other by John and Ruby Lomax. After 1939, five more were conducted by Florida’s FWP staff: Kennedy, Hurston, Robert Cook, Alton Morris, Corse, Robert Cornwell, John Filareton, and Herbert Halpert (of the Joint Committee on Folk Art’s Southern Recording Expedition.) Recording equipment was loaned to Florida’s WPA program by the Library of Congress’ Archive of the American Folk Song (later the American Folk Center). The field recordings were made on acetate disks, usually recorded at 78 rpm (although occasionally at 33 rpm). Because these disks were shipped from Washington DC to Florida, then to the recording site, and then back to Washington, these disks often were not of the highest sonic quality. Several had surface scratches and many had various recording speeds. In 1986, the FFP staff made copies of many of these recordings onto reel to reels for inclusion to the Florida Folklife Archive. The originals are still housed with the Library of Congress.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Zora Neale Hurston's grave siteZora Neale Hurston's grave siteStill ImageAnthropologists
Fieldwork
African Americans
Tombs
Cemeteries
Sepulchral slabs
Grave markers
Graves
Gravestones
Stone carving
Death rites
Burial rites
Authors
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991Still ImageA capella singing
Churches
Church services
Protestants
Hats
Special events
Music
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
African Americans
Haircutting
Barbering
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991Zora Neale Hurston Festival in 1991Still ImageAfrican Americans
Special events
Festivals
Barbecue cookery
Craft
Demonstrations
Food
Food preparation
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Writers' panel at the Zora Neale Hurston FestivalWriters' panel at the Zora Neale Hurston FestivalStill ImageAfrican Americans
Oral communication
Writing
Authors
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1576_16_c85-018WPA recordings featuring Zora Neale HurstonSoundSingers
Fieldwork
African Americans
Singing
United States. Work Projects Administration
New Deal, 1933-1939
Songs
Folklorists
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-255WPA field recordings in Sebring (March-July 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
African Americans
Fiddle music
Old time music
Performing arts
Singing
Music performance
Fiddlers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-246WPA field recordings in Riviera and Key West (January 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Bahamian American
Ballads
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
African Americans
Tales
Narratives
Accordion music
Storytelling
Guitar music
Musicians
Storytellers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-218WPA field recordings in Raiford and in Alachua County (1936-1937 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
African Americans
Old time music
A capella singers
Performing arts
A capella singing
Music performance
Singing
Elderly, the
Jails
Prisons
Drum music
Drum performance
Male prisoners
Arts in prisons
Prisoners
Blues singers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-253WPA field recordings in Mayport and Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation (March-July 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Native Americans
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Performing arts
Singing
Music performance
African Americans
Dance music
Tap dancers
Dancers
Shrimpers (persons)
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
a_s1576_t86-248WPA field recordings in Key West and Jacksonville (January 1940 recording expedition)SoundFieldwork
New Deal, 1933-1939
Interviews
Public service employment
Folklorists
Public welfare
United States. Work Projects Administration
Bahamian American
Sea songs
Bands (Music)
Performing arts
Horn music
Music performance
Singing
African Americans
Accordion music
Elderly, the
Tales
Narratives
Supernatural legends
Personal experience narratives
Musicians
Storytellers
Singers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
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