3 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Tradition Bearer is exactly "Garza, Maria"
Sorted by Title
Mexican pinatas made by Victoria Grimm and her apprentices

Mexican pinatas made by Victoria Grimm and her apprentices

Date
1986-05-02
Description
Seven color slides. Grimm's apprentices were Maria Garza and Raquel Herrera. Grimm, born in Mexico City, learned to make pinatas from her family. She made two types: ones made completely of papier-mache, and ones with clay pots covered in papier-mache. Pinatas were used during posada celebrations, Mexican Christmas traditions that was observed the nine days before the holiday to represent Mary and Joseph's trek to Bethlehem. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
The Folklife apprentice area at the 1986 Florida Folk Festival

The Folklife apprentice area at the 1986 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1986-04-29
Description
Twenty-seven color slides. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Victoria Grimm and her apprentices with their pinatas

Victoria Grimm and her apprentices with their pinatas

Date
1987-01-28
Description
Two proof sheets with 33 black and white images (plus negatives). Grimm's apprentices were Maria Garza and Raquel Herrera. Grimm, born in Mexico City, learned to make pinatas from her family. She made two types: ones completely of papier-mache, and ones with clay pots covered in papier-mache. Pinatas were used during the posada celebrations, a Mexican Christmas tradition that was observed the nine days before the holiday to represent Mary and Joseph's trek to Bethlehem. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Mexican pinatas made by Victoria Grimm and her apprenticesMexican pinatas made by Victoria Grimm and her apprenticesStill ImageArtisans
Apprentices
Pinatas
Arts, Mexican
Ethnicity, Mexico
Mexican Americans
Decorative arts
Decoration and ornament
Paper art
Paper work
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
The Folklife apprentice area at the 1986 Florida Folk FestivalThe Folklife apprentice area at the 1986 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageFestivals
Folk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Embroidery
Basket making
Pinatas
Demonstrations
Apprentices
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Victoria Grimm and her apprentices with their pinatasVictoria Grimm and her apprentices with their pinatasStill ImageArtisans
Apprentices
Pinatas
Decorative arts
Arts, Mexican
Mexican Americans
Latinos
Papier-mache
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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