3 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Tradition Bearer is exactly "Cypress, Margaret"
Sorted by Title
Ethel Santiago teaching Margaret Cypress sweetgrass basket making

Ethel Santiago teaching Margaret Cypress sweetgrass basket making

Date
1984-02
Description
Three proof sheets with 78 black and white images (plus negatives). Santiago and Cypress were among the first participants in the Florida Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program in 1983-1984. As a master folk artist, Santiago taught Cypress how to make sweetgrass baskets. Images include them gathering sweetgrass, weaving baskets, and of Owen transcribing tapes at the reservation. Traditionally, Seminoles baskets were shallow and woven from palmetto fronds. Circa 1930, sweetgrass baskets, inspired perhaps by African American arts, were designed to represent 'authentic' Seminole culture for the tourist trade. Over time, they became traditional. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen,who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was held each year until 2003.
Collection
Interview with Margaret Cypress, Seminole craftswoman

Interview with Margaret Cypress, Seminole craftswoman

Date
1984-01-24
Description
One audio cassette. Margaret Cypress, Seminole craftswoman describes her early childhood in Florida, and at the Cherokee and Oklahoma Boarding Schools for Indians; speaking Miccosukee and learning English; early experiences with Seminole crafts such as sweetgrass basketry; learning crafts throught the apprenticeship program; marriage; working in the fields; differences between her mother's basketry and that which is done in the program; pay for her work; her family; crafts she works on such as basketry and dolls; customers for Seminole crafts from the Arts and Crafts Chickee at Immokalee Reservation; difficulty of making palmetto baskets; types of transportation she and her family used when she was young (i.e. "Everglades Bag, Everglades Suitcase", hitching train rides, airplane rides to school in Oklahoma); more on her family including her cousin Ethel, also a craftswoman; more on school and life as a young woman; her work for the Seminole Tribe Community Health Representative.
Collection
Seminole basket makers at the 1984 Florida Folk Festival

Seminole basket makers at the 1984 Florida Folk Festival

Date
1984-05
Description
Four color slides. Making Seminole baskets. 543-544: Ethel Santiago and Margaret Cypress; 545: Santiago; 546: Cypress. Traditionally, Seminoles baskets were shallow woven from palmetto fronds. Circa 1930, sweetgrass baskets, inspired perhaps by African American arts, were designed to represent 'authentic' Seminole culture for the tourist trade. Over time, they became traditional.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Ethel Santiago teaching Margaret Cypress sweetgrass basket makingEthel Santiago teaching Margaret Cypress sweetgrass basket makingStill ImageBasket maker
Apprentices
Fieldwork
Teaching of folklore
Basket making
Sweetgrass baskets
Native Americans
Seminole Indians
Ethnicity, Seminole
Material culture
Plants
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
a_s1576_12_c84-005Interview with Margaret Cypress, Seminole craftswomanSoundBasket maker
Dollmakers
Fieldwork
Life histories
Interviews
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Basket making
Basket work
Oral histories
Dollmaking
Indian reservations
Palmetto weaving
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/audio.jpg
Seminole basket makers at the 1984 Florida Folk FestivalSeminole basket makers at the 1984 Florida Folk FestivalStill ImageFolk festivals
Folklore revival festivals
Ethnicity, Seminole
Seminole Indians
Basket making
Baskets
Sweetgrass baskets
Basketry
Native Americans
Demonstrations
Basket maker
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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