66 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Collector or Fieldworker is exactly "Roller, Peter"
Sorted by Title
Antonio Lerios and apprentice Nick Toth making dive helmets

Antonio Lerios and apprentice Nick Toth making dive helmets

Date
1986-02-24
Description
Thirty-four color slides. Lerios began making diving helmets for sponge divers in 1913 in Tarpon Springs. When he was in his 80s, he decided to retire. In the meantime, Toth, fresh with a degree from University of Florida, decided to learn the trade, and he worked as an apprentice for Lerios. By 1992 when Lerios died, Toth had assumed control of the business. Diving helmets date back to the early 1900s. Once Greek divers began diving for sponges in Tarpon Springs in 1905, the diving helmet industry in Florida began. The helmets allow divers to walk into deep water to gather sponges. For more history of Lerios and Toth diving helmets, see: http://www.divinghelmets.com/pages/history.html The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Apprenticeship exhibit at the Stephen Foster Center

Apprenticeship exhibit at the Stephen Foster Center

Date
1987-11
Description
Eight color slides. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Basket maker Myrtle McCoy

Basket maker Myrtle McCoy

Date
1987-07-21
Description
Two color slides. McCoy uses thread to make her pine needle baskets. She lived in Marianna since 1929.
Collection
Basketmaker Pauline Hodges with her apprenctices

Basketmaker Pauline Hodges with her apprenctices

Date
1987-03
Description
Six color slides. For the 1987 program, Hodges served as a master artist to two apprectices: Reba Harrison and Dorothea Kent. Both learned to make pine needle baskets. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Boats and fishers in Big Pine Key

Boats and fishers in Big Pine Key

Date
1986-10-21
Description
Eighteen color slides. Between 1986 and 1987, a partnership between the Florida Folklife Program and the American Folk Center created the Maritime Heritage Survey Project. Focusing on the Gulf and Atlantic fishing cultures, and utilizing photographs, slides, oral histories, and on-site interviews, the survey climaxed with a demonstration area at the 1987 Florida Folk Festival. The three main researchers were Nancy Nusz, Merri Belland, and project director David Taylor. Additional information on the project can be found in Taylor's project files in S 1716.
Collection
Bouzoukis player Jimmy Szaris

Bouzoukis player Jimmy Szaris

Date
1987-01
Description
One proof sheet with 11 black and white images (plus negatives). The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Coiled sweetgrass basket

Coiled sweetgrass basket

Date
1986-05-02
Description
Eight color slides. Maragret Garrison's great-grandmother (in Mt. Pleasant, S.C.) made this basket. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Corky Richards and his apprentice making oyster tongs

Corky Richards and his apprentice making oyster tongs

Date
1987-03
Description
Sixty three slides, with negatives. Images of Corky Richards with Rodney Richards on making oyster tongs for harvesting oysters in Apalachicola Bay. Includes three images of Rodney Richards playing the guitar.
Collection
Curly Dekle and apprentice Todd Nobles making cattle whips

Curly Dekle and apprentice Todd Nobles making cattle whips

Date
1986-02
Description
Four proof sheets with 105 black and white images (plus negatives). Nobles served as apprentice to master fok artist Dekle in 1985-1986. Nobles was Dekle's grandson. For information on their apprenticeship experience, see the fieldnotes in S 1640, box 3, flder 15. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Cypress furniture by Robert James Rudd and Neil Brooks

Cypress furniture by Robert James Rudd and Neil Brooks

Date
1986-11
Description
Seventeen color slides. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Antonio Lerios and apprentice Nick Toth making dive helmetsAntonio Lerios and apprentice Nick Toth making dive helmetsStill ImageApprentices
Diving Equipment and supplies
Greek Americans
Helmets
Metal craft
Sponge fisheries
Workplace
Workshops
Teaching of folklore
Copper
Metal products
Artisans
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Apprenticeship exhibit at the Stephen Foster CenterApprenticeship exhibit at the Stephen Foster CenterStill ImageApprentices
Furniture
Furniture makers
Exhibits
Education
Woodwork
Teaching of folklore
Chair-makers
Wood craft
Photography
Baskets
Basket work
Oyster tongs
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Basket maker Myrtle McCoyBasket maker Myrtle McCoyStill ImageBasket maker
Fieldwork
Basket making
Basket work
Basketry
Pine needle crafts
Baskets
Containers
Material culture
Decorative arts
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Basketmaker Pauline Hodges with her apprencticesBasketmaker Pauline Hodges with her apprencticesStill ImageFieldwork
Baskets
Basket making
Pine needle crafts
Material culture
Containers
Teaching of folklore
Basket maker
Apprentices
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Boats and fishers in Big Pine KeyBoats and fishers in Big Pine KeyStill ImageFieldwork
Fishing Equipment and supplies
Boats and boating
Seafood gathering
Material culture
Maritime life
Docks
Occupational groups
Fishers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Bouzoukis player Jimmy SzarisBouzoukis player Jimmy SzarisStill ImageFieldwork
Bouzouki
Greek Americans
Arts, Greek
Musical instruments
Music performance
Musicians
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Coiled sweetgrass basketCoiled sweetgrass basketStill ImageBasket maker
Fieldwork
Basket work
Basketry
Baskets
Pine needle crafts
Containers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Corky Richards and his apprentice making oyster tongsCorky Richards and his apprentice making oyster tongsStill ImageSeafood gathering
Material culture
Metal craft
Tools
Fisheries
Oyster industries
Oyster fisheries
Maritime life
Occupational groups
Guitarists
Musical instruments
Oyster tongs
Fishers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Curly Dekle and apprentice Todd Nobles making cattle whipsCurly Dekle and apprentice Todd Nobles making cattle whipsStill ImageWhip maker
Whip braider
Apprentices
Whip making
Whip braiding
Whips
Leather craft
Leather goods
Cattle
Ranching
Workplace
Teaching of folklore
Material culture
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Cypress furniture by Robert James Rudd and Neil BrooksCypress furniture by Robert James Rudd and Neil BrooksStill ImageFurniture maker
Furniture
Furniture makers
Wicker furniture
Cypress
Woodwork
Chairs
Wood craft
Tables
Apprentices
Chair-makers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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