371 items found
Collection ID is exactly "1" AND Event Name is exactly "Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program"
Sorted by Title
Workers at the Gulf Stream Crab Company

Workers at the Gulf Stream Crab Company

Date
1984-11
Description
Nineteen color slides. Workers unloading and steaming stone crabs. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Workers at Hubert's Net Shop

Workers at Hubert's Net Shop

Date
1984-11-02
Description
Twenty color slides. Shows Hubert and workers making a shrimp net. Images were created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year until 2003.
Collection
Workers at El Maximo Rancho

Workers at El Maximo Rancho

Date
1984-03
Description
Two proof sheets with 52 black and white images (plus negatives). Images include Thompson and McQuaig; Wilder making saddles; and Lee making cow whips. Created as fieldwork for both the apprenticeship program and the Florida Folk Festival. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year until 2003.
Collection
Wooden santos by Jose Orta

Wooden santos by Jose Orta

Date
1986-11
Description
Seven color slides. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Woodcarver Thomas Penney

Woodcarver Thomas Penney

Date
1984-11
Description
Four color slides. From Canada, Penney travels the country carving wood signs for businesses. Here, Penney carves a bear with a chainsaw. Images created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Wood carvers Bill and Dale Cooey

Wood carvers Bill and Dale Cooey

Date
1988-04
Description
One proof sheet with 24 black and white prints (plus negatives). Bill Cooey, a mix of Scottish and Yuchi Indian ancestry, grew up in the panhandle where he learned pocketknife carving from his mother, a descendant of the Yuchi Indians. His nephew Dale Cooey began to learn the craft with the Apprenticeship program in 1988. For more on Bill Cooey, see S 1644, box 3, folder 1. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Wood carvers Bill and Dale Cooey

Wood carvers Bill and Dale Cooey

Date
1988
Description
Thirty-nine color slides. Bill Cooey, who has a mix of Scottish and Yuchi Indian ancestry, grew up in the panhandle. There, he learned pocketknife carving from his mother, a descendant of the Yuchi Indians. His nephew Dale Cooey began to learn the craft with the Apprenticeship program in 1988. For more on Bill Cooey, see S 1644, box 3, folder 1. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year through 2003.
Collection
Whips by Curly Dekle

Whips by Curly Dekle

Date
1983-12
Description
Sixteen color slides. Examples of Dekle's whips. Images were created as fieldwork for the apprenticeship program. Dekle was a master artist during the third year, 1985-1986. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and had agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, who was later replaced by folklorist Peter Roller. The program was continued each year until 2003.
Collection
Wheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) Rubio

Wheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) Rubio

Date
1992
Description
53 color slides. Images of Hollenback and his apprentice Rubio making historic wheels. They performed the work at the Pioneer Settlement where Rubio worked as a blacksmith. Hollenback was originally from Illinois were he learned blacksmith and wheelwrighting from his father. Rubio was originally from New York. For more information on both of them, see S 1644, box 10, folder 5. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by first folklorist Peter Roller, then folklorist Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Wheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) Rubio

Wheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) Rubio

Date
1992
Description
Four color prints. Images of Hollenback and his apprentice Rubio making historic wheels. They performed the work at the Pioneer Settlement where Rubio worked as a blacksmith. Hollenback was originally from Illinois were he learned blacksmith and wheelwrighting from his father. Rubio was originally from New York. For more information on both of them, see S 1644, box 10, folder 5. The Folk Arts Apprenticeship Program began in 1983 with a NEA grant of $22,000. The program provided an opportunity for master folk artists to share technical skills and cultural knowledge with apprentices in order to keep the tradition alive. Apprentices must have had some experience in the tradition and agreed to train for at least six months. The first project director was Blanton Owen, later replaced by first folklorist Peter Roller, then folklorist Robert Stone. The program was continued each year through 2004.
Collection
Identifier Title Type Subject Thumbnail
Workers at the Gulf Stream Crab CompanyWorkers at the Gulf Stream Crab CompanyStill ImageFieldwork
Crab fisheries Equipment and supplies
Crabbing
Seafood gathering
Seafood industry
Crabs
Workers
Labor
Crabbers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Workers at Hubert's Net ShopWorkers at Hubert's Net ShopStill ImageNet maker
Merchants
Fieldwork
Workshops
Netmaking
Occupational groups
Workplace
Fishing nets
Labor
Workers
Textiles
Fishing Equipment and supplies
Trawls and trawling
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Workers at El Maximo RanchoWorkers at El Maximo RanchoStill ImageFieldwork
Ranching
Ranch life
Saddlery
Saddles
Leather goods
Occupational groups
Whip making
Whips
Workers
Workplace
Ranchers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Wooden santos by Jose OrtaWooden santos by Jose OrtaStill ImageCarvers (Decorative artists)
Wood carvers
Fieldwork
Figurines
Material culture
Wood carving
Woodwork
Wood craft
Religious art
Art and religion
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Woodcarver Thomas PenneyWoodcarver Thomas PenneyStill ImageCarvers (Decorative artists)
Wood carvers
Fieldwork
Chain saws
Wood carving
Decorative arts
Woodworking tools
Art
Figurines
Statues
Material culture
Wildlife wood-carving
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Wood carvers Bill and Dale CooeyWood carvers Bill and Dale CooeyStill ImageApprentices
Wood carving
Teaching of folklore
Decorative arts
Craft
Woodwork
Woodworking tools
Figurines
Workshops
Carpentry tools
Pocketknives
Carvers (Decorative artists)
Wood carvers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Wood carvers Bill and Dale CooeyWood carvers Bill and Dale CooeyStill ImageApprentices
Wood carving
Teaching of folklore
Decorative arts
Craft
Woodwork
Woodworking tools
Figurines
Workshops
Carpentry tools
Carvers (Decorative artists)
Wood carvers
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Whips by Curly DekleWhips by Curly DekleStill ImageWhip maker
Whip braider
Whips
Fieldwork
Leather
Leather craft
Material culture
Tools
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Wheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) RubioWheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) RubioStill ImageWoodworkers
Blacksmiths
Fieldwork
Wheels
Blacksmithing
Woodwork
Material culture
Woodworking tools
Workshops
Tools
Occupational groups
Occupational training
Metalwork
Transportation
Apprentices
Wheelwrights
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
Wheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) RubioWheelwright Lester Hollenback with his apprentice Albert (Tico) RubioStill ImageWoodworkers
Blacksmiths
Fieldwork
Wheels
Blacksmithing
Woodwork
Material culture
Woodworking tools
Workshops
Tools
Occupational groups
Occupational training
Metalwork
Transportation
Apprentices
Wheelwrights
/fpc/memory/omeka_images/thumbnails/catalog_photo.jpg
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