Pineapple fields at Yamato (1906)

Pineapple fields at Yamato (1906)

Image Number: PR13766

George Morikami with two men in pineapple field (ca. 1906)

George Morikami with two men in pineapple field (ca. 1906)

Image Number: PR13756

Mr. Morikami is on the right.

George Morikami with friends: Yamato, Florida (1906)

George Morikami with friends: Yamato, Florida (1906)

Image Number: PR13754

Home of H.T. Kamiya: Yamato, Florida (19--)

Home of H.T. Kamiya: Yamato, Florida (19--)

Image Number: N044920

Hideo Kobayashi on tractor: Yamato, Florida (193-)

Hideo Kobayashi on tractor: Yamato, Florida (193-)

Image Number: PR00004

Edward Minoru Ohi home (191-)

Edward Minoru Ohi home (191-)

Image Number: PR02889

It is beleived that the Ohi family moved to Eau Gallie from Yamato.

Japanese American men sitting by a home: Yamato, Florida (19--)

Japanese American men sitting by a home: Yamato, Florida (19--)

Image Number: PR13768

George Morikami on his farm: Yamato, Florida (192-)

George Morikami on his farm: Yamato, Florida (192-)

Image Number: RC05456

In the early 1900s, there was growing apprehension in the U.S. towards immigration, including immigration from Japan. While the settlers' children were United States citizens, Sakai and his fellow immigrants could not become naturalized citizens until the 1950s.

By the Second World War, few of the Japanese settlers remained. In 1942, not long after the Pearl Harbor attack when anti-Japanese sentiments were at a peak, the Federal government confiscated their land -over 6,000 acres - to create an Army Air Corp training base, ending the Yamato colony.

Situated on the site today is Boca Raton's airport and Florida Atlantic University. A former Yamato Colony settler, George Morikami, farmed in Delray Beach until the 1970s. He eventually donated his land, which is today preserved as the Morikami Museum and Gardens.