Restoration

In 1985, the State of Florida purchased The Grove from the Collins for $2,285,000. Under the terms of that agreement, LeRoy and Mary Call were allowed to stay in the home for the remainder of their lives.

The home reverted to the state upon their death and is undergoing renovations to be converted into a multipurpose historic house museum for the citizens of Florida.

Future Plans

Mary Call Darby Collins died in 2009, preceded by LeRoy's death in 1991.

Extensive structural and cosmetic restorations are taking place at The Grove. The Grove is being renovated with the goal of obtaining LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification.

Plans for the future of The Grove include classrooms, exhibits highlighting the periods of ownership by the Call and Collins families, event, and workshop space.

The goals for restoration work at The Grove are adaptive re-use and economic and environmental sustainability. For example, drainage pipes will be rerouted to the original cistern providing irrigation for The Grove without the use of city water.

Brick repair work during first phase of restoration at The Grove (2011)

Brick repair work during the first phase of restoration at The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00363

Interior brick wall prepared for restoration at The Grove (2011)

Interior brick wall prepared for restoration at The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00387

Division of Historical Resources Site Manager Dr. Robert Krause examining brick foundation structure on Grove property (2011)

Division of Historical Resources Site Manager Dr. Robert Krause examining brick foundation structure on Grove property (2011)

Image Number: DG00361

An Architectural Gem

The Grove is an example of Greek Revival architecture with Federal and Georgian influences evident in the floor plan. The architectural and historical significance of The Grove was formally recognized in 1972, when the home was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Despite some alterations, the architectural design of The Grove has retained the character envisioned by Richard Keith Call.

The only substantial additions to the home during the Collins era were the glass Florida room on the rear of the building and an adjacent modern kitchen.

Additions made by Reinette Long while she operated the Grove Hotel have been removed. Other significant changes have been made periodically to the stairs on the south entrance of the home facing Adams Street.

Frontal facade of Call-Collins House, The Grove (2011)

Frontal view of the Call-Collins House, The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00372

Archeological Findings

Archeological work has unearthed many artifacts on the property including toys, glass bottles, dishes and other household items.

Archeologists found a set of dog tags belonging to Second Lieutenant Joseph G. Azat of Pennsylvania in the cistern.

Research by Dr. Robert Krause, site manager at The Grove, confirmed that Azat trained at Eglin Air Force Base west of Tallahassee and may have visited The Grove during leave time. He was likely drawn to the Capital City by the presence of the Florida State College for Women.

Late 19th century glass bottle found during excavation of cistern well at The Grove (2011)

Late 19th century glass bottle found during excavation of the cistern well at The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00378

Dog tags for 2nd Lt. Joseph G. Azat (Kingston, PA), found during excavation of cistern well at The Grove (2011)

Dog tags for 2nd Lt. Joseph G. Azat (Kingston, PA), found during excavation of the cistern well at The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00377

Early 20th century chinaware (repieced), found during trenching and excavation at The Grove (2011)

Early 20th century china ware (re-pieced), found during trenching and excavation at The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00376

Painted ceramic artifact piece found during excavation of cistern at The Grove (2011)

Painted ceramic artifact piece found during excavation of the cistern at The Grove (2011)

Image Number: DG00369

The Legacy of The Grove

The history of The Grove spans nearly the entire period of U.S. control over Florida. The structure has been home to two governors, a hotel, silkworms, servants, slaves, at least one eccentric handyman and several remarkable women. Numerous descendants of Richard Keith Call have called The Grove home, and many more grew up on the grounds.

For generations of Floridians and residents of Tallahassee The Grove was a social institution, both as a hotel and as a meeting place.

Through the efforts of the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, The Grove will continue to enrich the lives of citizens of the State of Florida and serve as an educational tool on the history and culture of the Sunshine State.