1,074 images of Florida Seminole Indians, 1950s

Collection Number: M83-25

Creator: Peithmann, Irvin M

Title: Photographic collection, 1930-1960 (bulk 1950-1960)

Quantity: 1.25 cubic feet; over 1,000 images

Description:

This collection consists of photographs, negatives, and slides of Florida Seminole Indians taken primarily in the 1950s by Irvin M. Peithmann. The images portray Seminole life on the Brighton and Big Cypress Indian Reservations in southern Florida. The collection also includes some 1930s black and white negatives and prints by photographer Bob Becker, whose images Peithmann used in his published writings on the Seminoles. In addition, there are clippings about the Seminoles and Peithmann's work (photographic shows and books), screened (PMT) prints of photographs used in Peithmann's books, and some biographical material.

Historical Note:

Irvin M. Peithmann was an archaeologist, historian, and educator. He was born in Hoyleton, Illinois on October 11, 1904 and died May 16, 1981. He was the son of Edward and Sarah Jane (Smith) Peithman and married Leona Ruth Hendricks on March 20, 1926. Together they had two sons: Albert D. and Russell I.

Peithmann spent most of his life studying the archaeological remains of pre-historic Indians in Southern Illinois. In 1931 he joined the staff of Southern Illinois University and became Curator of Archealogy at the SIU Museum in 1949. During a leave of absence from SIU, Peithmann established a research base in St. Petersburg, Flordia, from which he made field trips and conducted extensive research on the Seminole Indians. This research resulted in his 1957 book, "The Unconquered Seminole Indians: A Pictorial History of the Seminole Indians."

Peithmann wrote extensively on American Indian history. Among his other books are "Echoes of the Red Man: An Archaeological and Cultural Survey of the Indians of Southern Illinois" (1954); "Red Men of Fire: A History of the Cherokee Indians" (1964); and "Broken Peace Pipes: A Four-Hundred-Year History of the American Indian" (1964).