Civil Defense

Information for Teachers

Citizens on the homefront volunteered in record numbers to aid the war effort. They planted victory gardens, joined civil defense organizations, and participated in various rationing efforts.

United behind the war effort like never before, Floridians participated in both voluntary and mandatory efforts to conserve strategic war materials. Drives to collect rubber, scrap metal, rags, paper, and grease became popular, as did “meatless” days to stretch the nation's food resources. Every man, woman, and child in the state received a ration book limiting what could be purchased.

Blackout orders forced hotels and other tourism industry businesses along the coast to dim their lights each evening. This was done to prevent silhouetting ships at sea against bright coastal lights, which made them easier targets for German U-boats operating in Florida waters.

The two documents included here deal with...

Documents

Use to Illustrate:

  • The impact of World War II on the homefront.
  • The coordination of civil defense efforts and volunteer work.
  • The implementation of blackout orders.
  • The effectivensess of scrap drives.

Relevant NGSSS

  • SS.4.A.1.1: Analyze primary and secondary resources to identify significant individuals and events throughout Florida history.
  • SS.4.A.7.3: Identify Florida's role in World War II.

    Examples may include, but are not limited to, warfare near Florida’s shores and training bases in Florida (Miami, Tampa, Tallahassee, etc.), spying near the coast, Mosquito Fleet.

  • SS.912.A.6.1: Examine causes, course, and consequences of World War II on the United States and the world.
  • SS.912.A.6.15: Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.

    Examples may include, but are not limited to, Mosquito Fleet, “Double V Campaign”, construction of military bases and WWII training centers, 1959 Cuban coup and its impact on Florida, development of the space program and NASA.

  • SS.912.A.6.4: Examine efforts to expand or contract rights for various populations during World War II.

    Examples may include, but are not limited to, women, African-Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans and their internment, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Italian Americans.

  • SS.912.A.6.5: Explain the impact of World War II on domestic government policy.

    Examples may include, but are not limited to, rationing, national security, civil rights, increased job opportunities for African-Americans, women, Jews, and other refugees.

Florida Standards

  • LAFS.4.RI.1.1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  • LAFS.68.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • LAFS.68.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

  • LAFS.910.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
  • LAFS.910.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
  • LAFS.910.RH.2.6: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
  • LAFS.910.RH.3.9: Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

  • LAFS.1112.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
  • LAFS.1112.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
  • LAFS.1112.RH.2.5: Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.