Exemption of military service for state personnel

Exemption of military service for state personnel

Credit this photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/18925
(please include photographer's name when noted).

Title

  • Exemption of military service for state personnel

Image Number

  • PT00190

Year

  • 19--

Series Title

General Note

  • Photograph of a letter.
  • The letter is dated May 4, 1864 from Governor Milton to James Sedden, Secretary of War for the Confederate States, concerning State Administrative personnel to be exempt from military service.

    Biography Note

  • John Milton, Fifth Governor, (October 7, 1861-April 1, 1865), was born near Louisville, Jefferson County, Georgia, on April 20, 1807, the son of General Homer Virgil and Elizabeth (Robinson) Milton. He was a descendant of the poet, John Milton. He was a lawyer who practiced in a number of Georgia and Alabama communities and in New Orleans; served in Florida during the Seminole War as captain of a volunteer company, and in 1846 moved to Jackson County as a farmer. Before coming to Florida, he reputedly killed an adversary in a duel.

  • Biography Note

  • Entering politics, he became a statewide force in the Democratic party, serving himself as a presidential elector in 1848 and as a member from Jackson County of 1850 House of Representatives. A vigorous States-Righter, he encouraged the seizure by Florida forces of Federal military establishments and also was instrumental in the early secession of Florida from the Union.

  • Biography Note

  • As Governor, he stressed Florida's ability to serve as an important source of food and salt for the Confederate forces. Collapse of the Southern cause was followed by his death by gunshot at "Sylvania," his home near Marianna, on April 1, 1865. In his last message to the Legislature, he had said "death would be preferable to reunion.

  • Biography Note

  • When the election of Abraham Lincoln precipitated the secession of the Southern states, Florida was the third state to withdraw from the Union. The Ordinance of the Secession was signed at Tallahassee on January 11, 1861. Until it joined the provisional government of the Confederate States of America on January 28, Florida was an "independent nation."

Physical Description

  • 1 photoprint - b&w - 24 x 18 mm.

Subject Term

Geographic Term

Personal Subject

Subject Corporate


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