Constitution of 1868

Constitution of 1868

Transcript

Escambia county, the second of Santa Rosa and Walton, the third of Jackson, the fourth of Holmes and Washington, the fifth of Calhoun and Franklin, the sixth of Gadsden, the seventh of Liberty and Wakulla, the eighth of Leon, the ninth of Jefferson, the tenth of Madison, the eleventh of Hamilton and Suwannee, the twelfth of Lafayette and Taylor, the thirteenth of Alachua and Levy, the fourteenth of Columbia, the fifteenth of Bradford and Clay, the sixteenth of Baker and Nassau, the seventeenth of St. Johns and Putnam, the eighteenth of Duval, the nineteenth of Marion, the twentieth of Volusia and Orange, the twenty-first of Dade and Brevard, the twenty-second of Hillsborough and Hernando, the twenty-third of Sumter and Polk, the twenty-fourth of Manatee and Monroe, and each Senatorial District shall be entitled to one Senator.


Section 30. No person shall ever be appointed as a judge of the Supreme Court or Circuit Court, who is not twenty-five years of age, and a practicing attorney in this State.


Section 31. The Legislature shall, as soon as convenient, adopt a State Emblem having the design of the Great Seal of the State impressed upon a white ground of six feet six inches fly and six feet deep.


ARTICLE XVII.


Amendments.


Section 1. Any amendment or amendments to this Constitution may be proposed in either branch of the Legislature, and if the same shall be agreed upon by a two-thirds vote of all the members elected to each of the two Houses, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be entered on their respective journals, with the yeas and nays thereon, and referred to the Legislature then next to be chosen, and shall be published for three months next preceding the time of making such choice, and if in the Legislature next chosen, as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be agreed to by a two-thirds vote of all the members elected to each House, then it shall be the duty of the Legislature to submit such proposed amendment or amendments to the people, in such manner and at such time as the Legislature may prescribe, and if the people shall approve and ratify such amendment or amendments, by a majority of the electors qualified to vote for members of the Legislature voting thereon, such amendment or amendments shall become a part of the Constitution.


Section 2. If at any time the Legislature, by a vote of a majority of all the members elected to each of the two Houses, shall determine that it is necessary to cause a revision of this entire Constitution, such determination shall be entered upon their respective journals, with the yeas and nays thereon, and referred to the Legislature then next to be chosen, and shall be published for three months next preceding the time of making such choice. And if in the Legislature next chosen aforesaid, such proposed revision shall be agreed to by a majority of all the members elected to each House, then it shall be the duty of the Legislature to recommend to the electors of the next election for members of the Legislature, to vote for or against a Convention; and if it shall appear that a majority of the electors, voting at such election, shall have voted in favor of calling a Convention, the Legislature shall, at its next session, provide by law for a Convention, to be holden within six months after the passage of such law, and such Convention shall consist of a number of members not less than both branches of the Legislature. In determining what is a majority of the electors voting at such election, reference shall be had to the highest number of votes cast at such election for the candidates for any office or [on] any question.