Photo Mystery Monday: October 26, 2015

This is one in a series of posts inviting our users to learn how to get the most information out of historic photos. We’ll post a new photo mystery every Monday, and then follow up with more information about the image on Friday. Get the conversation started by commenting on the blog and sharing it with your friends and family.

What people, objects and activities do you notice? What year do you think this is? Let us know in the comments! Don’t be afraid to state the obvious. Noticing details can lead to greater insight. What can these details tell you about life in Florida at the time the photo was taken?

Try an artist’s trick. Divide the photo into four quadrants and study each section. What new details do you see? Based on what you have observed, what can you infer from this photograph? What questions do you have?

Come back on Friday when we will update the post with more identifying information!

 

For Teachers: Photo interpretation is a great critical thinking activity for students. The Photo Analysis Worksheet from the National Archives lets you use any photo as an opportunity to analyze primary source documents.


UPDATE: Pig on the beach!

This photo shows the crowds enjoying the outdoors at the beach in Seabreeze, Daytona in 1904. Many are watching a pig in the surf in the far-off distance at the right.

Some people seem to be dressed for swimming. Others are wearing ties and fancy hats. Among the horse-drawn carriages there is at least one automobile. 1903 was the first year of the Ormond-Daytona Beach Race. In 1903 and 1904, several world speed records were set.


 

Photo Mystery Monday: October 19, 2015

This is one in a series of posts inviting our users to learn how to get the most information out of historic photos. We’ll post a new photo mystery every Monday, and then follow up with more information about the image on Friday. Get the conversation started by commenting on the blog and sharing it with your friends and family.

Be a photo detective! What is going on in this picture? What clues do you see? Where in Florida could this be?

What people, objects and activities do you notice? Let us know in the comments! Don’t be afraid to state the obvious. Noticing details can lead to greater insight.

Try an artist’s trick. Divide the photo into four quadrants and study each section. What new details do you see? Based on what you have observed, what can you infer from this photograph? What questions do you have?

Come back on Friday when we will update the post with more identifying information!

 

For Teachers: Photo interpretation is a great critical thinking activity for students. The Photo Analysis Worksheet from the National Archives lets you use any photo as an opportunity to analyze primary source documents.


UPDATE:

This photo shows a safe being delivered to the Polk County Bank in Bartow by means of an ox team pulling a flatcar over temporarily laid railroad tracks.

Reader Patsy Glasscock noticed details such as the prevalence of men wearing hats, the difference between the men in more casual clothes compared to those in business attire, the lack of women in the photo and the presence of a child.

Several readers mentioned the gap in the rails on the dirt street, indicating that the track was temporary. Jon Hoppensteadt observed that no one in the photo was armed, indicating that the safe was probably empty.

We had originally had this photo dated some time in the 1800s. As Jo Reimer noted, the Polk County bank was organized in 1886. Thanks to diligent research by blog readers, and with confirmation from our Archives Historian, we’ve updated the catalog record.

Thanks all, and join us next Monday for a new photo!


Photo Mystery Monday: October 12, 2015

This is one in a series of posts inviting our users to learn how to get the most information out of historic photos. We’ll post a new photo mystery every Monday, and then follow up with more information about the image on Friday. Get the conversation started by commenting on the blog and sharing it with your friends and family.


Be a photo detective! What is going on in this picture? Do you have a guess as to what year it might be? Where in Florida could this be?

What people, objects and activities do you notice? Try an artist’s trick. Divide the photo into four quadrants and study each section. What new details do you see?

Based on what you have observed, what can you infer from this photograph? What questions do you have?

Come back on Friday when we will update the post with more identifying information!

For Teachers: Photo interpretation is a great critical thinking activity for students. The Photo Analysis Worksheet from the National Archives lets you use any photo on Florida Memory as an opportunity to analyze primary source documents.


 UPDATE: This photo shows actress Ann Blyth swimming in the underwater set during filming of Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid at Weeki Wachee in 1948.

Astute blog reader Susan noticed the contrast between the squeaky clean set and the natural background. Here’s a view of the set before it was lowered into the water.

And we had a real mermaid join us in the comments!

Thanks everybody!


 

Picture Florida: October 2, 1947

This photograph was taken on October 2, 1947. What can this picture tell you?

Be a photo detective! What is going on in this picture? What clues do you see? Don’t be afraid to state the obvious. Noticing details can lead to greater insight.

What people, objects and activities do you notice?

Try an artist’s trick. Divide the photo into four quadrants and study each section. What new details do you see?

Based on what you have observed, what can you infer from this photograph? What questions do you have?

Come back on Monday when we will update the post with more identifying information.

 

For Teachers

  • Photo Analysis Worksheet from the National Archives
  • Standards: SS.4.A.1.1, LAFS.68.RH.1.2, LAFS.68.RH.1.1, LAFS.910.RH.1.1, LAFS.910.RH.1.2, LAFS.1112.RH.1.1, LAFS.1112.RH.1.2, LAFS.1112.RH.3.9, SS.912.W.1.3, SS.912.A.1.2

UPDATE: It’s Fuller’s Earth!

Fuller’s earth was mined by the Floridin Company in Quincy, Florida. Fuller’s earth has been used in the movies to make pyrotechnic explosions look more spectacular as the fine particles linger in the air and reflect light. It also has uses for filtration, as an absorbent and as a cleaning agent.


 

Florida History Fair 2016

Each year, middle and high school students from across the state participate in the Florida History Fair program, coordinated at the state level by the Museum of Florida History. The students create performances, websites, display boards, documentaries, and essays to present their research on a wide variety of historical topics.
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Top 5 Creatures on Florida Memory

What creatures lurk in the collections on Florida Memory? Check out our top five, then nominate a few of your own!

5 . Giant Fish

The lively portraiture of a fish called the Dolphin...The top of his back and all his fins be blue, all his sides are of light green, the belly white, his head almost all blue, the tail one part blue, and the lower part green. He is very pleasant to behold in the sea by day light, and in the night he seemeth to be of the colour of gold, he takes pleasure as other fishes do in swimming by the ship, he is excellent sweet to be eaten.

“The lively portraiture of a fish called the Dolphin… The top of his back and all his fins be blue, all his sides are of light green… He is very pleasant to behold in the sea by day light, and in the night he seemeth to be of the colour of gold.” Excerpt from a map by Italian cartographer Baptiste Boazio depicting Sir Francis Drake’s 1586 raid on St. Augustine (1589).

 

 4. Mermaid

Mermaid checking her hair in a mirror: Weeki Wachee, Florida

Mermaid checking her hair in a mirror: Weeki Wachee, Florida (1960).

 

3. Writhing Swamp

Lithograph of a Florida swamp (ca. 1800s)

Lithograph of a Florida swamp (1800s).

 

2. Alligator Dragon

Envelope decorated by Herbert A. Franke and addressed to Koreshan Unity president Hedwig Michel in Estero, Florida

Envelope decorated by Herbert A. Franke and addressed to Koreshan Unity president Hedwig Michel in Estero, Florida (ca. 1972).

 

1. The Creature

Ginger Stanley in the grip of the Creature From the Black Lagoon -at Silver Springs, Florida (1955)

Ginger Stanley in the grip of the Creature From the Black Lagoon at Silver Springs, Florida (1955).

Share this post with your friends and family on Facebook, and leave comments to nominate your favorite Florida Memory creature, or perhaps another from our photographic collections!

Have You Seen This #Selfie?

We spotted this photo from our collection in the opening credits of the TV show Selfie.

Sada Roffe posing with Kodak camera

The image of Sada Roffe posing with a Kodak camera was taken in Tallahassee, Florida, ca. 1900 by photographer Alvan S. Harper. A professional photographer, Harper lived and worked in Tallahassee from 1884 until his death in 1911.

Selfie was cancelled, but don’t feel bad for Alvan Harper. His photographs have appeared in many publications over the years and helped to define how Americans view our past.

The Kentucky Club in Lewis Park, Tallahassee, Florida

This group of local actors in a park Tallahassee, Florida was featured in the in the first book of the Time-Life series, This Fabulous Century. Notice the levitating hat?

Although largely unidentified today, Harper’s photographs of the teachers, business owners and leaders of Tallahassee’s vibrant African-American community are important records of this era.

Young woman wearing fancy hat

 

Man in a satin-faced coat, holding a cane

 

Harper’s photographs also captured the trendy new Penny-Farthing bicycles.

Three young men with Penny-Farthing bicycles

Check out the rest of the Alvan S. Harper Collection on Florida Memory!

 

Glass Lantern Slides

Young women fishing with cane poles from a jetty
The old Gregory house before it was moved: Ocheesee Landing, Florida.
People walking through a forest

These hand-tinted glass lantern slides are from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Collection. The 53 slides in the collection show a variety of Florida’s natural features, including scenes of rivers and river banks, forests, nature trails, fishing, sand dunes, and swimming.

The image of the Gregory House went unidentified until it was recognized by a patron on our Florida Memory Flickr page. We were able to match the image with another in our collection and confirm that this was indeed the house in the slide.

The Gregory House, built in 1849 by Planter Jason Gregory, stood at Ochesee Landing across the river from the Torreya State Park. In 1935, the house was dismantled and moved to its present location in the park by the Civilian Conservation Corps, which was developing the park.

The remaining 52 images have very little identifying information. However, they are a beautiful example of Florida landscapes depicted on glass lantern slides, ca. 1940s.

People on a Lakeshore

Glass lantern slide shows were popular both as home entertainment and as an accompaniment to speakers on the lecture circuit. They reached their popularity about 1900, but continued to be widely used until the 1930s when they were gradually replaced by the more convenient 35-milimeter slides.

Young women posing in swimsuits on sand dune

Related Resources

 

Florida Archaeology Month

Marine archaeologist W. A. “Sonny” Cockrell demonstrates the use of an astrolabe, a 16th century navigation instrument found in one of the treasure ships sunk off Florida’s coast.

Marine archaeologist W. A. “Sonny” Cockrell demonstrates the use of an astrolabe, a 16th century navigation instrument found in one of the treasure ships sunk off Florida’s coast.

In celebration of Florida Archaeology Month, the exhibit Florida Archaeology: Studying and Exploring 12,000 Years of Floridians showcases images of the archaeological resources throughout the state and the professionals, enthusiasts and amateurs that have explored, preserved, and interpreted the archaeological record in order to better understand Florida’s millennia of human occupation.