FHS Digitization in Progress…

Each year, the Florida Memory team selects one large archival collection for digitization and addition to the website.

This year, our friends at the Florida Historical Society in Cocoa loaned us two collections from their holdings for digitization. The first is Governor John Milton’s letterbook from 1861-1863. The second collection includes correspondence and other documents related to two-time territorial governor Richard Keith Call and his daughter Ellen Call Long.

We will scan the original documents, such as the one below, and make them searchable through an online database. This process will take about one year, with the collection going live in the summer of 2014.

Image from John Milton's Letterbook, 1861

Image from John Milton’s Letterbook, 1861

This series of blog posts will chronicle the digitization of these remarkable collections and highlight significant documents discovered along the way.

Stay tuned for the second installment, which examines the journey of Governor John Milton’s letterbook to Tallahassee… for the third time.

Peruvian Waltz

Florida is home to immigrants from across Latin America and the Caribbean. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), this series of blog posts features music brought to Florida from throughout the Hispanic world.

We are highlighting the Peruvian waltz for our final blog post in the series celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. The waltz is a style of musica criolla, which originated in coastal Peru. Its roots come from a combination of traditional Spanish, Romani, and African music.

Hilda Gonzalez, Miami, 1985

Hilda Gonzalez, Miami, 1985

In 1986, Florida folklorists conducted the Dade Folk Arts Survey in order to identify folk artists for the 34th Annual Florida Folk Festival. During the course of the survey, a Latin American trio of musicians (Nelson Zuleto, Hilda Gonzalez, and Manolo Franco) performed the Peruvian waltz Alma, Corazon, y Vida (Soul, Heart, and Life).

Nelson Zuleto, Miami, 1985

Nelson Zuleto, Miami, 1985

Enjoy!

Peruvian Waltz, by Nelson Zuleto, Hilda Gonzalez, and Manolo Franco
[audio:http://floridamemory.com/fpc/memory/collections/folklife/blog/Latin_American_folk_trio.mp3|titles= Peruvian Waltz, by Nelson Zuleto, Hilda Gonzalez, and Manolo Franco |artists=State Archives of Florida] Download: MP3

More Information: Catalog Record

Old Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Home

One of the newest collections on Florida Memory is the Old Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Home. This collection consists of applications for admission to the Home as well as a small amount of documentation attesting to the veracity of the applicant’s claim.

Confederate veterans reunion, Crawfordville, 1904

Confederate veterans reunion, Crawfordville, 1904

The Home opened in Jacksonville in April 1893 and operated until 1938. In its final years of operation, organizations such as the United Daughters of the Confederacy played a significant role in caring for the veterans.

These documents provide a wealth of information about Confederate veterans and the health problems they incurred as a result of their service. These records complement the Confederate Pension Applications, which provide more comprehensive information about Confederate veterans and widows living in Florida after the Civil War.

Tallahassee Democrat Collection

The Tallahassee Democrat Collection contains photographic negatives taken by Tallahassee Democrat photographers from the 1950s to 1970.

Three unidentified African American servicemen posing with a woman in Tallahassee (ca. 1955)

 

Two unidentified cigarette girls in Tallahassee (1956)

 

FSU football players in Tallahassee (1957)

FSU football players in Tallahassee (1957)

 

FSU freshmen sitting in front of William James Bryan Hall in Tallahassee (1953)

FSU freshmen sitting in front of William James Bryan Hall in Tallahassee (1953)

 

Dorian Stripling getting his first haircut in Tallahassee (1957)

Dorian Stripling getting his first haircut in Tallahassee (1957)

 

Governor LeRoy Collins monitoring Democratic primary election results with supporters in Tallahassee (1956)

Governor LeRoy Collins monitoring Democratic primary election results with supporters in Tallahassee (1956)

 

Unidentified African American football players in Tallahassee (1953)

Unidentified African American football players in Tallahassee (1953)

Join us tonight, October 11, from 6:00 to 8:00 PM for a slideshow event featuring images from the Tallahassee Democrat Collection.

Unidentified in the Tallahassee Democrat Collection

The Tallahassee Democrat Collection contains photographic negatives taken by Tallahassee Democrat photographers from the 1950s to 1970.

Many of these images are only partially identified and contain unidentified people and places. If you have additional information about any of the unidentified images please let us know in the comments, or contact us at the State Archives of Florida.

Two unidentified women reading the Tallahassee Democrat newspaper (1957)

 

Three unidentified African American servicemen posing with a woman in Tallahassee (ca. 1955)

 

Unidentified young women at the Watermelon Festival in Monticello (1957)

Unidentified young women at the Watermelon Festival in Monticello (1957)

 

Unidentified WTVT cameraman in Tampa (1957)

 

Two unidentified cigarette girls in Tallahassee (1956)

 

Two unidentified Tallahassee police officers (1957)

 

Unidentified boy with go-kart in the Quincy parade (1953)

 

Unidentified pharmacist with a box of Chux disposable diapers in Tallahassee (1957)

Join us this Friday night, October 11, from 6:00 to 8:00 PM for a slideshow event featuring images from the Tallahassee Democrat Collection.

Salsa Express

Florida is home to immigrants from across Latin America and the Caribbean. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), this series of blog posts features music brought to Florida from throughout the Hispanic world.

Cubans made their mark on Florida long before it became part of the United States. In recent years, Cuban immigrants have played a major role in shaping Florida’s politics, economy, and cultural landscape. Cuban musical traditions are some of the most vivid and recognizable expressions of Cubanidad imported from the island to the mainland.

Salsa music, which originated in Cuba, became internationally popular in the 1970s with its ability to pack the dance floor. Salsa was influenced by many different styles of music but its core structure comes from Son Cubano, which features a mixture of Spanish and African elements.

Salsa Express, Miami, ca. 1980

Salsa Express, Miami, ca. 1980

In October 1981, as part of the Cuban American Slide and Tape Project, Florida folklorists recorded a performance by Salsa Express at the Latin Fiesta Club in Miami (pictured below).

Latin Fiesta Club, Miami, 1981

Latin Fiesta Club, Miami, 1981

Enjoy!

Salsa Express performing at the Latin Fiesta Club
[audio:http://floridamemory.com/fpc/memory/collections/folklife/blog/Salsa_Express.mp3|titles= Salsa Express performing at the Latin Fiesta Club |artists=State Archives of Florida] Download: MP3

More Information: Catalog Record

Learn more about the Cuban Experience in Florida

Okeechobee

This series looks at the etymology of Florida place names derived from the Muskogee and Hitchiti languages.

Many Florida place names owe their origins to Muskogee and Hitchiti, two of the languages spoken by members of the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida. The persistence of Muskogee and Hitchiti words as modern Florida place names reflects the prominent role played by Native Americans in the region’s history.

Today’s term is Okeechobee, meaning “big water.” The word is a combination of okee (water) and chobee (big).

Excerpt from “Map of the Seat of War in Florida,” (1839)

Excerpt from “Map of the Seat of War in Florida,” (1839)

Okeechobee is perhaps the best known Muskogee language place name in Florida. Prior to the 19th century, however, the lake was known by a succession of different names. For example, in the map below the lake is labeled as “Lac du St. Esprit,” a French version of the Spanish imposed name Laguna Espiritu Santo (Lagoon of the Holy Spirit).

Excerpt from "Carte de la Floride et de la Georgie," by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, 1780

Excerpt from “Carte de la Floride et de la Georgie,” by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, 1780

Another name for the lake used by Europeans in the late 1700s was Lake Mayaco, as shown on the map below by English cartographer Bernard Romans. The term Mayaco is possibly derived from Mayaimi, a name for an indigenous tribe that occupied the area at the time of first contact with Europeans and Africans.

Excerpt from "General Map of the Southern British Colonies," by Bernard Romans, ca. 1776

Excerpt from “General Map of the Southern British Colonies,” by Bernard Romans, ca. 1776

Maps from early territorial Florida also used forms of the ancient term, such as Macaco in the below example by H.S. Tanner.

Excerpt from "Map of Florida," by H.S. Tanner, 1823

Excerpt from “Map of Florida,” by H.S. Tanner, 1823

The Americans learned a great deal about the geography of southern Florida during the Second Seminole War (1835-1842). Sometime in the early stages of that conflict, U.S. Army topographers started using Okeechobee as the name for the large, shallow lake that serves as the headwaters of the Everglades. The area around Lake Okeechobee witnessed significant combat during the Seminole Wars, especially during the Battles of Lake Okeechobee (December 25, 1837) and Loxahatchee (January 24, 1838).

Seminole families reoccupied the region near Lake Okeechobee following the conclusion of the Seminole Wars. As late as the 1920s and 1930s, Seminole camps in the area extended from as far north as Sawgrass Lake in western Brevard County, to as far south as the Palm Beach canal, and at several spots along the northern rim of Lake Okeechobee, from west of Fort Pierce to the Indian Prairie. Many of these camps moved to the Brighton Reservation after 1936. The Indiantown families moved to Dania (now Hollywood) in about 1928.

The majority of Seminoles in the early 20th century lived south of Lake Okeechobee, near the Big Cypress Swamp and along the Tamiami Trail. These southern bands of Seminoles, predominately Mikasuki-speakers, were sometimes known as either the Cypress or Miami Indians. Their counterparts living north of Lake Okeechobee were sometimes known as the “Cow Creeks,” after a small stream west of Fort Pierce that flows into the great lake.

Excerpt from "Approximate Location of Permanent Seminole Camps," by Roy Nash, 1930

Excerpt from “Approximate Location of Permanent Seminole Camps,” by Roy Nash, 1930

On the map above, Seminole camps near Lake Okeechobee circa 1930 are marked by numbered circles: 1. Billie Smith; 2. Sam Jones (not included on excerpt above); 3. Billie Buster; 4. Naha Tiger; 5. Joe Bowers; 6. Summerlin; 7. Willie Johns; 8. Charlie Micco; 9. Billy Bowlegs; 10. Billie Stewart; 11. Dan Parker; 12. Ella Montgomery.

Charlie Micco, Brighton Reservation, 1949

Charlie Micco, Brighton Reservation, 1949

Despite the tendency for Seminoles to live in matrilocal camps during the period depicted in Nash’s map, many outsiders, including government officials, assigned settlement names according to the resident elder male. This reflected an ongoing misunderstanding of the Seminoles’ social organization and a tendency to recognize men alone as suitable heads of household.

To learn more, see Bertha E. Bloodworth and Alton C. Morris, Places in the Sun: The History and Romance of Florida Place Names (University Presses of Florida, 1978); John K. Mahon, History of the Second Seminole War, 1835-1842 (University of Florida Press, 1991 [1967]); Jack B. Martin and Margaret McKane Mauldin, A Dictionary of Creek/Muskogee, with Notes on the Florida and Oklahoma Seminole Dialects of Creek (University of Nebraska Press, 2004); Roy Nash, “Survey of the Seminole Indians of Florida,” 71st U.S. Congress, 3rd sess., Senate Document 314 (Washington, D.C.: Govt. Print. Office, 1931); John T. Sprague, The Origins, Progress, and Conclusion of the Florida War (University of Tampa Press, 2000 [1848]); John R. Swanton, Early History of the Creek Indians and Their Neighbors (University of Florida Press, 1998 [1922]).

Tallahassee-Leon County Civil Rights Heritage Walk

Earlier this week, the City of Tallahassee unveiled a commemorative sidewalk that recognizes the pivotal role played by Tallahassee and Leon County residents in the Civil Rights Movement.

The artistic sidewalk, located at the intersection of Monroe and Jefferson Streets in downtown Tallahassee, is appropriately placed near the site of many dramatic moments during the struggle for civil rights in Florida’s capital city.

The photographs below captured some of those events and the daring individuals who challenged segregation and changed history.

Reverend C. K. Steele (left) and Reverend Daniel Speed protesting segregated seating on city buses, December 24, 1956

Reverend C. K. Steele (left) and Reverend Daniel Speed protesting segregated seating on city buses, December 24, 1956

 

Northeast corner of Adams and Jefferson Streets during the McCrory's and Woolworth's sit-ins, March 12, 1960

Northeast corner of Adams and Jefferson Streets during the McCrory’s and Woolworth’s sit-ins, March 12, 1960

 

FAMU students protesting the arrest of sit-in participants, March 12, 1960

FAMU students protesting the arrest of sit-in participants, March 12, 1960

 

Sit-in at Woolworth's lunch counter, March 13, 1960

Sit-in at Woolworth’s lunch counter, March 13, 1960

 

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

 

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

 

Demonstration in front of a segregated theater, 1963

Demonstration in front of a segregated theater, 1963

 

FAMU students arrested for protesting at segregated theaters, March 31, 1963

FAMU students arrested for protesting at segregated theaters, March 31, 1963

These eight photographs tell only a small part of the story. To learn more, see The Civil Rights Movement in Florida (online learning unit); Tananarive Due and Patricia Stephens Due, Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights (New York: Ballantine Books, 2003); Glenda Alice Rabby, The Pain and the Promise, The Struggle for Civil Rights in Tallahassee, Florida (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999).

The Archives on the Radio!

Everything you wanted to know about the Archives and Florida Memory, but were afraid to ask… well here’s your chance!

Jody Norman, Archives Supervisor, and Jon Grandage, Archives Historian, will join host Tom Flanigan for Perspectives (88.9 WFSU-FM) today, October 3, from 11 to 12 PM. During the live call-in show, Jody and Jon will promote special events coming up in October in celebration of Archives Month and discuss what’s new and exciting on Florida Memory and at the State Archives.

Please join us on the air Thursday morning!

Red Barber and Fred Astaire share a microphone, Tallahassee, ca. 1950

Red Barber and Fred Astaire share a microphone, Tallahassee, ca. 1950

October is American Archives Month

Join us for special events at the R.A. Gray building in Tallahassee in celebration of American Archives Month 2013.

2013 Archives Month Poster

On Friday October 11, 2013, visitors will be treated to free food, drinks, and a slideshow in the lobby of the R.A. Gray building. The slideshow will feature images from the Tallahassee Democrat, many unpublished, showing scenes of life in and around Tallahassee from the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s. Refreshments for the slideshow event, which will run from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., are generously provided by the Friends of the State Library and Archives of Florida.

On Saturday October 12, 2013, the Archives’ Imaging Lab will be open to the public from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Residents of Tallahassee and the surrounding area are encouraged to bring in their original Florida-related family photographs for possible inclusion in the collections of the State Archives of Florida (no digital images please). Many of these images will eventually be made available on the Florida Memory website as part of a special “Big Bend Area” photographic collection.

Both events are free and open to the public and will take place at the R.A. Gray building, 500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL, 32399.

Email Archives@DOS.MyFlorida.com for more information.